Month: October 2017

ARTICLE ABOUT Nigel Olsson (Elton John) FROM SOUNDS, August 7, 1971

He had just limited success with his solo career, but through playing thousands of live shows and recording with Elton John, he is indeed a household name. With the name Olsson I guess he`s got swedish ancestors, and the name of his daughter, Annette, sort of confirms this theory of mine.
Not the most imaginative guy, naming his first four solo albums: Nigel Olsson’s Drum Orchestra and Chorus, Nigel Olsson, Nigel Olsson (second self-titled) and Nigel. Oh, well….
Still going strong in his 68th year – may he continue to keep the rhythm for Elton John for many years to come.

IMG_0896

Nigel Olsson`s Utopia

By Dick Meadows

“I don`t always want to be known as Elton John`s drummer and nothing else. I owe that man so much, but it would be nice if I could make it on my own with my own ideas and my own things.”
The speaker was Nigel Olsson, whose drumming with Elton has earned him in turn applause, respect and now not a little adulation. He is also a man with a pretty powerful vision of what he wants from the business in the future.
At the moment that means making a success of his first solo album “Nigel Olsson`s Drum Orchestra And Chorus” which has just been released. The album is really Olsson and Friends for among those who worked on it were Mick Grabham, Caleb Quaye, Dee Murray and Kathi McDonald.

URGENCY

Clutching a cup of tea, Olsson talked in Dick James` office where the album was recorded about the kind of music he wants to play. “I think people may have been a little surprised at the album. It`s not really heavy is it? I`m just not into heavy music. I just want to lay down the kind of stuff that I really enjoy.”
When Olsson talks you detect a sense of urgency in his voice. It`s as if he fears that if he stops talking and planning and working like a madman his success so far and his vision of the future may desert him with all the speed of a quick roll round the kit.
You can hardly blame him. He knows all about the instant rise-and-fall world of pop from bitter first-hand experience. For Olsson has been up, very down and now he is up again. But this time he reckons there is going to be no going down again.

VERY SHY

Olsson turned to drumming after making a botch of the guitar. “I was playing guitar and singing for a group in Sunderland. That was when the Beatles came in and I gave up guitar because I couldn`t get the chord sequences right! I was really shy then and didn`t like being out front singing. So I ended up at the back with the drums.
“When I joined Plastic Penny together with Mick (Grabham) it was a huge change for me. I jumped from being nothing to being something. At the time I was working in a garage fitting exhaust systems. So I went straight from underneath lorries with oil dripping in my face to the top of the business.

FOOLISH

“I was very foolish with my money then. I spent it like water and just didn`t care.”
But he began to care all right when Plastic Penny couldn`t keep up with the Great Hit Parade Carnival. They went down and down and Nigel went with them. It was a bad scene and when the group split it got worse. A star one minute. A nobody the next.
A tour of the States with Spencer Davis and some gigs with Uriah Heep brought in some bread but it was still nowhere land for Nigel Olsson. However at that time a guy called Elton John was beginning to make a big impact.
“Dee Murray and I joined him for a gig at the Roundhouse. We rehearsed together beforehand and it was incredible. Everything went so exactly right for us. We got right into it from the beginning.”
The rest is pop history. Elton took the band on tour to the States and was a fantastic success. Now he is in that strange aristocracy of the business which writers have labelled “The Superstars”.
Does Elton deserve to be a superstar?
“I don`t really like that description. It can mean a lot of things. But if anyone is a superstar then Elton is. He worked so incredibly hard for the band in the States. He never seemed to stop working. That man`s a lunatic but an incredible, marvellous lunatic.
“Things haven`t changed for us. It is like it has always been. We are all friends together and it is like a big family. There have never been any arguments. I guess that`s because we all know exactly where it`s at when we are together.”

FREAK

Later this month Olsson goes on the road again with Elton, this time around the world. The tour will take in America and then zig-zag about Asia.
Is the band more popular in the States than England?
“I guess it must be, simply because we have done so much work over there. I was absolutely knocked out by some of the receptions we got and some of the nice things said about me.”
And nice things they were too. The New York Times described his drumming as “beyond breathtaking” and Cashbox enthused: “He`s growing into one of rock`s finest drummers.”
Does it worry him that the band is more popular over there than in England?
“Yes, I suppose it does. It is always nice to make it really work in your own country, but there is so much work in the States and of course there`s a lot of bread to be made there.”
For his first solo album, Olsson used material mainly written by himself, Quaye and Grabham. The formula is broadly the same for his second Drum Orchestra album which he has already almost completed. All that remains to be done is to add vocals by Kathi McDonald and Claudia Linnear. It was hoped they could get over here for the cuts but now the plan is that they will do the vocals in the States during Elton`s tour.
The Drum Orchestra production is Nigel`s work and he is very enthusiastic about doing a lot more. He is also keen to put his own band on the road some time in the future. “I would like to have about 14 musicians travelling together. I know it would work and we shall see it through when we have got it together.”
Other plans gaining momentum are a farmhouse in Essex, part of which will be converted into a studio, and his own record company. In January he will also be recording a new album with Elton. The music business and Nigel Olsson certainly aren`t going to be parted for some time yet it seems.
“It is just that I am completely into music. There is nothing else I want to do. I`m utterly freaked out on music – a music freak if you like.
“I have never been so happy. Yet I realise that in this business one day you can be up and the next day everything may be ruined. I know I could never do a 9-5 job again.”

IMG_0897

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Stu Cook (Creedence), Stray, Seatrain, Arthur Brown, Cambridge Folk Festival, Don Everly, Herbie Hancock, Rod Demick and Ernie Graham, Fairport Convention, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Dave Cousins, Taj Mahal, Kid Jensen, Ray Fisher.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

Advertisements

ARTICLE ABOUT David Bowie FROM SOUNDS, JULY 31, 1971

Just a short one today. This time a really early live review of Mr. Bowie.
Busy with work, but trying my best to have the time to work out these posts. I like them a lot myself!

IMG_0892

Bowie`s wide range

By Steve Peacock

I`m not quite sure what I expected from David Bowie`s set at the Country Club on Wednesday, but I wasn`t prepared for such a wide range of ideas – with songs ranging from his own “Oh You Pretty Things” to Jaques Brel`s “Port Of Amsterdam” – all put across with a sense of purpose and conviction that would have been unusual even in someone who had far less to say. That Bowie can be so convincing with such a wide range of ideas means he is either a superb actor or a performer with a remarkable command of his art. I think the latter is nearer the truth.

Technically there were a few problems – like long breaks between songs, which got a bit tedious, and the fact that the balance was wrong so that when Mick Ronson played acoustic guitar you couldn`t hear him too well – but overall those things were pretty insignificant. Ronson seems to be the perfect foil for Bowie. Playing electric and acoustic guitars, bass, and singing; his electric guitar work was particularly impressive – delicate and sympathetic, but still projecting well – and their voices are well matched.
Rick Wakeman joined them for a few numbers on piano, and it was nice to hear him filling out the sound rather than launching into the flash displays of technique that the Strawbs` music often seems to demand from him.

Songs I enjoyed most were the opening “Fill Your Heart”, “Oh You Pretty Things”, Biff Rose`s “Buzz The Fuzz”, Ron Davies` “It Ain`t Easy”, and David`s song to the shadow of a superhero “Bob Dylan”. But it was his version of Brel`s “Port Of Amsterdam” that I felt was the most satisfying part of the set; it`s a great song of course, which helps, but as Scott Walker has shown it is one that is quite easy to destroy with an unsympathic performance. Bowie did it just right.

IMG_0893

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Rolling Stones, Boz Scraggs, Beach Boys, Bill Chase, Lincoln Fair, Medicine Head, Tim Hardin, John Schlesinger, Blind Boy Fuller, Michael Chapman, Dion, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Jackie Lomax, Andy Fernbach, Mary Travers, Buffy St. Marie, Steeleye Span, Chris Barber.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Mott The Hoople FROM SOUNDS, JULY 10, 1971

The album described in this article, “Wildlife”, were album number three from this band. It was not the album that would break them in the US, but it would reach UK charts at No. 44, their highest charting album at that point of their history. More success would come later for this band.
Enjoy.

IMG_0877

Mott and the rowdy rockers

By Ray Telford

I am inclined to agree when someone talks of “Wildlife” as being Mott The Hoople`s best album. It sold well, too, but not quite well enough for Mott to ease the burden of responsibility they had to keep the thunder rock customer satisfied.
That album was a bit dramatically termed the `maker or breaker` for them. It contained less aggressive songs and in comparison to their first album, “Mad Shadows”, and their live shows it was a touch of tenderness.
Guitarist Mick Ralphs reckons each of their albums to be a diary of how the group have been playing at the time of the recording and adds that the various changes in the albums have been fairly obvious although they have always had to come up with the rowdy rockers during performances for what he calls their hard core of fans.

Rock

Strange as it may seem and taking their place among the three most convincing British hard rock bands (the other two being Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath) Britain has never been particularly kind to Mott The Hoople. For a time it looked as though America might take them to the dizzy heights but as Mick explains: “It was good. The last tour which we just finished was our second and it was all right but we still lost money although we went down better than we did on the first trip. I reckon it`ll take a few more visits if we`re to make it in a big way but I think we`ll be concentrating more on appearances across here.”

IMG_0878

Visual

“Really, though”, interjects drummer Buffin, “audiences both here and in America are a bit suspicious of what we`re about. Our stage show goes down very well across there but they expect the big visual thing from English bands. That`s why Jethro Tull and Led Zeppelin are so big because most audiences like to knock themselves out over a band.
The current Mott The Hoople single called “Midnight Lady” is like a progression from the songs on “Wildlife”. Mick says it`s the nearest thing yet they`ve put on record to what they are like on stage and it is a very conscious attempt at getting a hit single.
Much of Mott`s earlier material was produced by Guy Stevens who did so much for the group on their first Island Records release.
“I still think the first album sounds great even though we`d only been together two or three weeks before it was recorded. We produced “Wildlife” ourselves because Guy thought that there were too many of his ideas going into the group. You know, he doesn`t play himself so he was kind of using us to project his ideas. Still he was great at picking material.
“He`s still manager of the group but he doesn`t produce us now. He`s a bit like what Keith Reid is to Procol Harum, really, in that he makes us so much more conscious of what we`re doing.”
Although Buffin and Mick are highly pleased with all their albums Buffin thinks “Wildlife” was a bit tame and says that anyone listening to it wouldn`t get a true picture of the group.
Mick: See, there are a whole lot of things we`ll have to get down to. People right away think of us as a hard rock band and little else. It`s because we`re not well known enough to start doing other things. The rock numbers are more immediate on stage and so we have to play them. Until we can get back onto a good level with all our songs we won`t be going back to the States.”

Success

In a way Mott The Hoople have come to a cross-roads in their career. Their continuing success, it seems, depends entirely on whether or not they can consolidate and to some degree re-convert their existing British fans to where they are at now.

IMG_0879

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bill Graham, John Baldry, Rod Stewart, Annette Peacock, Jimmy Webb, Judy Dyble, Bread, Roger Chapman, Hookfoot, Bukka White, Zoo, Tir na nOg, Spirit, Quiver. Morning, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Writing On The Wall, Glencoe, Cyril Tawney.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Yes FROM SOUNDS, JULY 3, 1971

This is a really fun article featuring Yes as they still, even after three albums, were a somewhat “small” band in the scope of things to come. The new guy at the time, Mr. Howe, turned out to be a very important member of the band.
If someone know who the original journalist was that wrote this article, please give me a hint so he is given his due when it comes to credits for this article. The name was not printed in “Sounds”.
Enjoy this great time travel, back to a time when Yes were a student band.

IMG_0820

CAMPUS

Yes is one of those bands that everybody who knows about music claims to admire, but who have nevertheless never gained the recognition or the success that they deserve. They are, inevitably, one of the most popular bands on the college scene today -inevitably, because they are a profoundly musical group at what is, by present day standards, a very reasonable price. Like Quintessence, and Argent, Yes are a group that seem to have been waiting at the door for a long time.

HAPPEN

There are strong indications, though, that Yes are beginning to happen and if they do it will no doubt give great satisfaction not only to them but to the many social secretaries who have booked them in the past, and who have later told me just what good value they are, both onstage and off.
I had the chance to talk to Jon Anderson of Yes a couple of weeks ago about the university and college scene in general, and he showed a sympathetic understanding of the problems which student organisers have to face.

SYMPATHY

Jon didn`t think that his music was any better received by students than by anyone else. Reaction from all kinds of audience tended to be much the same – which is how it should be, of course, since students don`t have a monopoly of musical appreciation (though some of them seem to think so).
“We like to play colleges and clubs because that way we reach the widest possible audience. For instance, if we play an ordinary date in Manchester then at the university, we`ve reached as many people as possible unless we did the Free Trade Hall.
“I also think that a concert at a university – any concert – is a good thing because it brings the students together under one roof. In large places like Leeds, Birmingham or Portsmouth, where they`re scattered about all over the place, this is particularly good.”
John had a lot of sympathy for college promoters in a lot of the technical colleges in the cities.

IMG_0829

AWFUL

“Some of them have halls that are pre-Victorian, and they are very badly supported, often because they`re competing with a university up the road with much better facilities.
We played in one hall once, it was twice as high as it was long. The acoustics were awful – the sound came out really distorted. You can`t expect to hold concerts in a place like that. But compare that with somewhere like LSE. They`ve only got a small hall – I don`t suppose it seats more than 900 people – but its got a tremendous atmosphere, good lightshow and so on.”
I asked Jon about the band`s future plans. He told me that they were going to America with Jethro Tull (they should be there now, in fact) and they were very hopeful that they would be able to build on the small but solid foundations laid by their previous two U.S. tours. The band will not be appearing in this country again until late autumn – Jon hopes to do a tour then, to coincide with a new album which he hopes will be released towards the end of the year. They would fill in the gaps between now and then writing and rehearsing new material.

BRUNT

The inclusion of new member Steve Howe means that the main brunt of writing has been taken off Jon: he and Steve now do a lot of composing together. This has the additional advantage of providing one more direction to the already wide range of Yes` music. Some of Steve`s work appeared on their most recent album, but he is coming even more into it as the re-constituted group finds its feet.

HELP

Then, in the autumn, a few more college gigs. It may be that by then Yes will have achieved the recognition that has been predicted for them for so long. I doubt if this will mean that they will stop doing college and university dates, though, even if greater commitments prevent them playing at them quite so often. Jon`s sympathy for what most student promoters are trying to do (even if they so often fail through lack of experience or whatever) is apparent. When I asked him about the bad experiences Yes had been through, or the colleges he wouldn`t go back to, he said there were none.
“We`ve had a few problems, I suppose, but I don`t want to put students down. Even when they cock things up, they`re trying to help us and that`s what counts.”

IMG_0830

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Traffic, Bronco, Humble Pie, Kate Taylor, Gary Burton, Tony Williams, Stephen Stills, Murray Head, Sandy Denny, John Sebastian, Clouds, Heads & Hands and Feet, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blood, Sweat & Tears, Curtis Mayfield, Scotty.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Humble Pie FROM SOUNDS, JULY 3, 1971

Here is a band that most have heard the name of, but still may not know their music. One of the bands forgotten by the tick-tocking of time, effectively ending their career in 1975 and then releasing two albums at the start of the 80s as a final “hurrah”.
The original members of this band all played in several bands, many of them known at least at the level of Humble Pie or more. Everyone knows Peter Frampton after his famous solo live album “Comes Alive”, but Steve Marriott should be a familiar name for most, not at least through his time playing for Small Faces.
At the time of this interview their greatest success as a band were still waiting just around the corner. In 1972 and 1973 they charted both in the UK and the US with the albums “Smokin`” and “Eat It”.

IMG_0820

A Humble offering of rock `n` roll

By Royston Eldridge

Humble Pie have made it but they haven`t had it easy. They`ve done it the hard way by spending months working around America, living down that initial supergroup ballyhoo that they never really wanted, until now when they`ve reached the stage where they`re accepted as a rock and roll band in their own right.
And that`s really all they`ve ever wanted. “I can`t kid myself,” Steve Marriott says, “I`m an old rock and roller, I`ll never be anything else, I`ve never wanted to be anything else.” Peter Frampton thinks the same way too and both of them have always wanted a group to play in where they`ll be known as musicians and not pretty faces.
“We`ve done a few clubs in England, the Marquee and things like that, and we also did one Locarno which we decided we`d never do again after being screamed at. We`ve never wanted that; all we`ve wanted to do is just to lay some rock and roll on the audience and try and bring a little bit of excitement back. It`s been a bit dull, don`t you think?”
So far all the excitement that Humble Pie have created has been in America where they`ve worked their way up from supporting act to headliners. A switch which happened in one week in New York. “We played the Fillmore with Cactus and the next week they asked us both back and the next time we headlined over Cactus. It was a really good gig,” Frampton explains.

SCRATCH

In England progress has been slower but then Humble Pie haven`t played here that much. “When we first started we did a concert tour in England on the strength of the hit single and people weren`t really sure of us, they didn`t know whether we were going to be a teenybopper group or whatever. They weren`t too sure of our past reputations.
So we just decided to do America first, somewhere to go to where they had no pre-conceived idea of what we are, and we started from scratch there. I mean they knew Greg from Spooky Tooth and they knew Steve had come from the Small Faces but they didn`t really know Jerry or myself. I was known just about from the Herd because we were always meant to be going over but we never really made it.
“Now we`ve spent like nine months slowly building up a reputation in America and we`ve got a reputation as a good band now. It`s taken us some time, sure, the last tour was three months long, but we`d made up our minds to stay until the album got into the charts and it has done. It didn`t get as high as we`d have liked it to but it made it.” Frampton spoke from Frankfurt where he, Marriott, Greg Ridley and Jerry Shirley were in the middle of a European tour.
The Piemen return on Friday for Saturday`s Hyde Park concert with Grand Funk Railroad, a group that Humble Pie have played with a lot in the States. “We`ve done some really big arenas with Grand Funk and it was good for us because we`re able to reach so many people in a short space of time. Like at Madison Square Garden and St. Louis you`re playing to 20,000 at a time and then we`re playing Shea Stadium with them in July.

IMG_0819

RECORDS

During their last American tour, Humble Pie recorded at the Fillmore East and they hope to have a live album and their next single out of what was put down on tape at what Frampton describes as a “really good” gig.
“We did it about three weeks, it was the last gig we did and it was really good. We`ve got to mix it again, we`ve mixed it once, but we`re going to take the tapes to America with us when we go over to play Shea Stadium.
“The single will probably be `I Don`t Need No Doctor` which is a number that Ray Charles does very well. And the album will probably be a double album and that`ll be out in September. The single should be out at the end of July.
“The album will have the whole of the stage act on it and even some of the numbers that we don`t do every time. There`ll be some of our real favourites like `Rolling Stone` which is the Muddy Waters number, `Gilded Splinters` and `Four Day Creep` which is normally our opening number.”

CLOSE-DOWN

Hyde Park apart, Humble Pie aren`t likely to be playing England again until late autumn. After their next American tour they plan to return to Europe for a two-week round of appearances and then come back to England although Frampton feels there aren`t many good venues left.
“There seems to be something of a close down. When I was there I got the feeling that there was no excitement anymore, they`ve closed down Mothers in Birmingham which was a good gig, like doing the Marquee, but there`s not much else especially outside of London unless you do a concert tour. There`s Birmingham Town Hall, there`s a few other town halls, but there`s nothing like the Lyceum and you can`t keep playing London.”
America then remains of major importance to Humble Pie although they`d like, in Frampton`s words, to lay some rock and roll on English audiences. America has accepted them, England remains to be conquered.

IMG_0821

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Traffic, Bronco, Yes, Kate Taylor, Gary Burton, Tony Williams, Stephen Stills, Murray Head, Sandy Denny, John Sebastian, Clouds, Heads & Hands and Feet, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blood, Sweat & Tears, Curtis Mayfield, Scotty.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.