Month: November 2017

ARTICLE ABOUT David Bowie FROM SOUNDS, August 14, 1971

At the time of this article, David Bowie had released three albums without too much success. In December of the year 1971 he would release his fourth album, Hunky Dory, his most successful album yet and an album that would be recognised as one of his best. His signature song “Life on Mars?” would feature on the coming album, a song that may be one of music history`s most recognisable among the millions of songs created.
Great work there, Mr. Bowie.

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Confessions of a disillusioned old rocker

By Steve Peacock

In something like rock, which is dominated at the moment by people who are either concerned with gaining respect and recognition for the validity of their intentions or with defining the problems within and around itself, the odd clown doesn`t come amiss. You have to be able to laugh at yourself, and if you don`t there has to be someone around to give you`re pretentions a bop with a purple pig`s bladder – otherwise you never find out which are pretentions and which work.

INSANITY

But the trouble with most of the rock and roll clowns is that they rarely relate too much to rock and roll – like Freddie and the Dreamers, who were basically stand-up comics with music. The Bonzo Dog Band worked, because they mixed their insanity with perfect parody and a sharp insight into the subjects they chose to ridicule; if you heard them doing a blues or something, it was so right that it helped you step back and revalue all those white suburban bands singing about the cottonfields.

INFLUENCED

In a slightly different way, David Bowie works on the same principle. Listening to the tracks he has recorded for his next album and seeing him on stage, you know that he is a writer and performer of considerable skill; but off stage Bowie the person has no illusions.
“I`m not writing very deeply at the moment,” he says as he sits in the opulent surroundings of his manager`s office in Regent Street. “I`m just picking up on what other people say, writing it down, and making songs out of it. I`m not thinking for myself any more, because I decided that everything I write sounds very much like what everybody else writes. So I decided to cut out the middle-man – me – and go straight to the source of what I`m talking about.
“I`d rather retain the position of being a photostat machine with an image, because I think most songwriters are anyway: I don`t think there are many independent-thinking songwriters, they`re all very heavily influenced, far more than in any other form of writing.”

DISPOSABLE

Because it`s such a fast-moving thing? “Because it`s such a disposable medium, that`s why. Because you can say things and if they`re not studied or talked through great analytical study, they`ll survive for a few weeks and seem quite prophetic, and quite studied and deep. That`s the fun of the pop-biz, it`s so un-serious and un-together – an art form of indifference, with no permanent philosophy behind it whatsoever.
“I don`t listen to rock music, you see. I`m not very musical and I find music just a platform for my own fringe lunacies of thought. I think very methodically and very much like anybody else off stage – in quotes – but on stage I just give it the benefit of the doubt and give it everything I`ve got that happens to be tucked away in the recesses of my mind. My songwriting is certainly not an accurate picture of how I think at all.”

ORDINARY

Was there any way he felt he could present such a picture? “It`s not really worth it because I`m incredibly ordinary. I don`t think that people want to pay good, hard-earned, capitalist money to know what I really think. In fact I don`t know why you bother with me when you`ve got John Lennon who is an astounding person – I mean as a guy; possibly the last remaining existentialist that`s around, definitely not a hippy, could possibly be a beatnik. He`s old school, and I adore him because of that, because I`m very influenced by the old school. My brother turned me on to all that – Kerouac and all those – before… before flower-power hit me.” He laughs at the memory.
“You see, I always thought life was wonderful, I didn`t realise everything was so bad until everybody told me. They`re all so serious today.”

LOT OF FUN

So why was he in it at all? “Well I`m not you see, I`m in the very fortunate position where I don`t consider myself in music, so I don`t have to worry about who I compare with or who I`m like, because I`m not like anybody else. So I have a lot of fun just being me. I don`t study it, and I`m not an avid follower of anything much. I never have wanted to consider myself in the rock business too much.”
He feels he`s in a good position, with managers and people who pay his rent and expenses so he can spend time with his wife and child, write songs, make records, and generally mess about doing things that interest him at the time. He wouldn`t say that the idea of dedicating himself to rock music, gigging every night and doing all that bit, appealed to him.

DRUGS

“It must be increasingly obvious,” he says, “that it`s just a road to nowhere. It`s become the new extension of factory work, or no-one joins the army any more, you join a group, and you have roadies that are sergeant-majors and you go out on fatigues to gigs, and wear a uniform. And our Achilles heel is our brainpower, which is practically non-existent, and centres entirely around sex and drugs. I understand it`s very lucrative if you make it.”
Once upon a time, David Bowie was a rock and roll singer. He didn`t much like singing other people`s songs, though he doesn`t mind now, so he started writing his own. So he was a songwriter.
“I suppose I`m a disillusioned old rocker. I`m sure that if I`d made it I would have adored it all – all the gold lame and everything, it would have been fabulous. Then I found myself in a mime company, that made me a clown, and I came out of it a clown/songwriter.”

Bowie

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Alun Davies, Roger McGuinn, Rev. Gary Davis, Judy Collins, Ottilie Patterson, Gentle Giant, Black Sabbath, Moby Grape, Henry McCullough, Marc Bolan, Yes, Led Zeppelin, Family, ELP, Jethro Tull, Grease Band, Osibisa, Strawbs, Pink Floyd, Mimi Farina.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Yes FROM SOUNDS, August 14, 1971

Hope you like this short, but very detailed article when it comes to their equipment. One of the bands that continually prove that you can have a long and great career without being “commercial”. And that`s great!
Enjoy!

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Yes move in a new direction

By Steve Peacock

One of the most heartening things to have happened over the last year or so is the gradual emergence of Yes out of the comfortable but rather unsatisfactory position of being a band with a small but devoted cult of followers, to their present status as one of Britain`s most popular live bands who also have one of the best and most successful albums of recent months – “The Yes Album”.

OBSCURITY

Those who have followed the progress of Yes since their first album knew it would happen sooner or later, but it is nice that it has happened now because not only is “The Yes Album” by far and away the best thing they have done to date, but it is high time they got the wide recognition they deserve.
However, it is often as well for a band to remain in relative obscurity for a time, because it gives them the chance to really work out their music and sort out any problems they may have within the band.

PERFECT

It came as quite a surprise to a lot of people when the original guitarist Peter Banks left the band, but after a little time with his replacement Steve Howe there was little doubt that it was a change for the better. Banks was good, but Howe is perfect for the band as they are at the moment, and you feel that he has great reserves of ideas that could contribute greatly to the development of Yes in the future.
He has a mastery of technique and an alertness of approach in his guitar playing that suggests he has a lot more to give yet.
Anyone who has seen the group recently will know just how effective their stage performance can be – they strike a fine balance between theatrical presentation (they look good, they use effects sparingly but in the right places, and they use lighting simply but well) and carefully presented but uncontrived performance of their music.

BROADER

Now that they have established themselves and are at a point where they have achieved about everything that could be expected of the music they have been developing since their inception, Yes feel that the time is right to move out into a broader direction. Up to now it has been very much Jon Anderson`s band – based around his songs – but in the future they say that the others will have a lot more to do with the writing within the group.

YES

EQUIPMENT

PA
Sound Reinforcement System with 4 5 channel 1567/B mixers by Altec Lansing System is worked from the audience
with Agraphic equaliser, a limiter and a three-way electronic crossover.
3 S.A.E. power amps for bass and monitors – 275 watts per side.
2 Crown stereo amps – mid and high range – 300 watts per side.
2 bass bins 22 x 20 JBL speakers.
2 JBL short-throw horns.
2 Altec Lansing 1 x 2 longthrow multi-cell horns.
2 Altec Lansing highrange horns.
2 Altec Lansing short-throw mid range horns.
3 floor speaker monitor cabinets which contain a mixture of 12″ JBL speakers and short-throw horns.

Steve Howe
1 Fender dual showman amp
2 Fender dual showman cabinets
1 Echoplex echo unit
1 Gibson fuzz box
1 Marshall fuzz box
1 Vox wah wah pedal
1 Fender tone and volume pedal
1 Gibson 176 B guitar
1 Martin 1008 acoustic guitar
1 Vachalia (which is a Portuguese instrument like the lute)

Chris Squire
1 Fender dual Showman amp
2 Dual showman cabinets with 22 x 20 JBL bass speakers
2 Rickenbacker guitars
1 Telecaster guitar
1 Marshall fuzz box

Tony Kay
1 Hammond C3 organ
2 122 RV Leslie cabinets both miked to PA with spring suspension

Bill Bruford
Ludwig drum kit
1 22″ bass drum
1 12″ alto tom tom
1 14″ floor tom tom
1 16″ floor tom tom
1 14″ snare drum
5 Zildjian cymbals
1 Chinese cymbal

Jon Anderson
1 KBI synthesizer

Microphones
Various Unidyne mikes

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Alun Davies, Roger McGuinn, Rev. Gary Davis, Judy Collins, Ottilie Patterson, Gentle Giant, Black Sabbath, Moby Grape, Henry McCullough, David Bowie, Marc Bolan, Led Zeppelin, Family, ELP, Jethro Tull, Grease Band, Osibisa, Strawbs, Pink Floyd, Mimi Farina.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Marc Bolan FROM SOUNDS, August 14, 1971

In this article we get to know that the change of Marc Bolan`s musical style came as a shock to some, but the journalist quite fancy him as a rock star. At the time of writing he was on the verge of being one of the biggest with the release of his album “Electric Warrior” on the 24th of September 1971. The album went to number one in the UK charts.
A nice tidbit that I decided to include here is the equipment for the band and individual band member. Today this would count as a really modest set-up, but I guess it was different at the start of the 70s. For the fanatic T. Rex fan, I hope this is useful when you start your T.Rex cover band.

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Elf King`s switch to a rock star

By Penny Valentine

All the aficionados of the elf with stars in his hair got quite a shock this year. Surely the most amazing success story of the 70`s must be Marc Bolan`s transition from Elf King to commercial rock star.
Hands were raised in horror by the Bolanised minority – the people that had come to expect a never-ending impression that Marc Bolan was carrying on where Donovan had left off: a pop poet with a strong leaning towards magic and mystic references during the course of his lyrics.
The first shock came when “Ride A White Swan” suddenly appeared in the singles chart – a fact that meant Bolan was no longer solely confined to one audience. And the inverted snobbery which has existed since pop music began raised its head and howled. Marc Bolan had taken T. Rex out onto the commercial market. What was more, he`d made it work.
You`d have thought the Eiger had fallen over or the Mona Lisa had said “arse” the way everyone carried on. “Sold out,” they cried and yet how much real difference is there between “Desdamona” and “Ride A White Swan”, between “Woodland Bop” and “Get It On”?
In breaking into the mass market, he has lost none of the charm, the insidiousness, the musical technique that first brought him to notice.
Bolan raises what might be described as an ethnic point in music. I have always considered that a musician`s job was first of all to do what he thought was right and gave him most pleasure as a musician, and secondly what people enjoyed. Bolan has done both.

PHALLIC

But the fact is that when people look on you with the same rapture as they look on Bilbo Baggins they don`t take easily to having you turn into Elvis Presley overnight. And what was worse for them was that Marc Bolan was actually enjoying it. Actually enjoying rushing off to Mr. Freedom for sparkly jackets and skin-tight trousers and behaving outrageously on stage. Actually rolling around with his guitar and getting pretty phallic in the meantime.
Bolan himself with Mickey Finn spreading further to record in America with a couple of the Mothers is, he says, just naturally extending from the point he started at. On his own admission, he took a Rick Nelson guitar riff and put it into many of his numbers, including “Ride A White Swan”, and nobody complained or even noticed then.
“You can hear,” he says, “parts in my old material which were completely based on the rock music I`d been brought up with as a kid.”

ROCKER

So the music basically remains unchanged. What Bolan needed to do – get extrovert on stage – came through easily with the success on the commercial market. One naturally bed the other, and Bolan took to his new role like the old rocker that had laid beating always under the fairy glades and elfin gambols.
Perhaps today the mystic aura and the attentive audience (small) has been replaced by the wild sexuality and riotous audience (large). But in the ensuing change-over Marc Bolan as musician and composer has lost nothing and gained much more. Not just success in monetary terms, or recognition from the world at large that he never had before but, lo and behold, here`s Marc Bolan and T. Rex a real life rock and roll idol – the kind everyone said we needed a couple of years back!

Bolan

T. Rex`s equipment

PA:
3 Vampower 100 watt amp
3 Vamp cabinets
2 Vox Supreme amps
1 Vox Supreme cabinet
1 Vox AC30 amp
1 WEM echo unit
1 fuzz box
1 treble booster
1 wah wah pedal
8 100 watt stereo quad amps
5 RCA cabinets – custom built by Kelsey and Morris
5 monitor speakers – custom built by Kelsey and Morris
1 studio mixer deck – custom built by Kelsey and Morris
5 horns – custom built by Kelsey and Morris
1 transformer – custom built by Kelsey and Morris

Microphones:
9 Shure microphones

MARC BOLAN
1 Fender Telecaster guitar
2 Fender Stratocaster guitars
1 1947 Les Paul guitar
1 Custom Les Paul guitar
1 Epiphone acoustic guitar
1 Woolworths organ
Picato strings

MICKIE FINN
1 Mexican conga
4 African talking drums
2 sets bongos
1 Chinese gong
Set of Mexican claves
Various marraccas
Various tambourines

STEVE CURRIE
1 Fender Precision bass guitar
1 Fender six-string guitar
Rotosound strings

BILL LEGEND
1 Hayman Professional drum kit
Zyn cymbals, 1 ride/1 crash/1 Hi-Hat
Ringo Starr drum sticks

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Alun Davies, Roger McGuinn, Rev. Gary Davis, Judy Collins, Ottilie Patterson, Gentle Giant, Black Sabbath, Moby Grape, Henry McCullough, David Bowie, Yes, Led Zeppelin, Family, ELP, Jethro Tull, Grease Band, Osibisa, Strawbs, Pink Floyd, Mimi Farina.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Black Sabbath FROM SOUNDS, August 14, 1971

Quite an interesting article giving us an impression of how the band were viewed and who they were compared with at the start of their career. Today, some of the comparisons may seem a little “out there” for a lot of us. The album in question, “Master of Reality”, is still one of the better albums ever released. The song named “Children Of The Grave” is worth the price of this album alone. If you don`t like this, you surely can`t call yourself a rocker.

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Black Sabbath: a band of our time?

SOUNDS Editor Billy Walker reviews the band`s new LP “Master of Reality” and looks at their almost fanatical following

Whatever criticisms are levelled at their third album “Master Of Reality” (Vertigo 6360 050) Black Sabbath and their fans know that, like their American counterparts Grand Funk Railroad, they`ll move straight to the top of the charts and further cement their almost fanatical following throughout Britain, the States and on the Continent. Sabbath aren`t fooling anyone, least of all themselves, they`ve found a cast-iron market – made up mostly of teenagers between the ages of fourteen and seventeen – they know what they want and they`re giving it to them, it`s as simple as that.

SADISTIC

This particular market, adolescent if you like, relates strongly with the material Sabbath put out and regardless of its aesthetic value there`s no denying its financial value on one hand and the strong “message” for the kids on the other. Bill Ward, the band`s drummer, says “Most people are on a permanent down, but just aren`t aware of it. We`re trying to express it for the people.”
The astonishing success of “Black Sabbath”, “Paranoid” and the obvious success that will follow with “Master Of Reality” shows Ward`s statement to be most accurate and their heavy, droaning, repetative numbers full of thumping bass lines and doominess were described by one American fan as “sort of sadistic”.
This might be an imaginary thing arising from the band`s flimsy ties with Black Magic in early career but there`s no doubting the very weight of their music, the underlying suggestions and a strong sexuality that was brought to a peak by Led Zeppelin, a band that Sabbath have been compared with endlessly.
Former manager Jim Simpson is quoted as describing Sabbath`s music as “basic, raw, dirty and bad” and “an honest interpretation of their background and environment”. On the other side it might be said they are playing to a `success format`, giving the masses what they want without questions, and not trying to move artisticly forward. Certainly they weren`t playing the same sort of stuff when they were known as Earth and from reports they are far better musicians than their Black Sabbath materials/albums would have many believe.

SLAMMED

The parallels with America`s Grand Funk Railroad are numerous and pretty obvious. Funk are slammed again and again by critics but it doesn`t stop the kids loving them and their records and concerts from being huge successes. In a way too both bands are laying down the same lines musically-aggressive, thumping, apparently without melody and aimed straight for the vitals – leaving little room for style and none for romantics.
In Britain Sabbath`s following seems to be regional – London audiences, for one reason or another, aren`t totally sold on them – but in the States and Europe, especially Germany, they are enormous and their appeal far more general. Their second date at Fillmore East, for example, sold out three weeks before the concert and the climate of American adolescence, rather than militance, holds the key – both here and abroad – to their appeal.
The audiences that flock to Sabbath`s concerts in the States are, to quote an American magazine, “the kids who are growing their hair long this year” and this sort of `no messing` music is the kind that expresses and perhaps relieves some of the hang-ups the fourteen and fifteen year olds are feeling. It`s also the sort of stuff that newcomers to music can easily pick up on and doesn`t need too much understanding, just listen and react.
When you`re fifteen, with all the hassles the age seems to be beset by, the rainbow world of James Taylor, complexity of Miles Davis or sunshine sailing of CSN & Y isn`t what it`s all about – Sabbath and Funk is – impulsive, strong, high-energy, music sexually brash and basic. This is true of audiences all over the world and therefore Black Sabbath`s market, for the moment at least, is evergreen with new additions every year.

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Therefore, in reviewing any Sabbath record or concert all of these points must be considered. Whatever the verdict on “Master Of Reality” it will doubtless be a huge seller and Sabbath can afford to be generous and ignore their critics` remarks about lack of originality or progression.
The opening track on “Master”, “Sweet Leaf”, is pure Sabbath, virtually the same tempo throughout, cracked vocals with tremendously heavy guitar from Tony Iommi and equally weighty, undulating bass lines from Geezer Butler and seemingly unstoppable drumming by Bill Ward. There is a short guitar break in the middle but they`re soon back to the thrusting, repetition and thudding tempo.
“After Forever” suffers from this monotony and again it`s the lumpy bass work of Butler wedging and pushing its way to the top that comes over strongest. When guitarist Iommi occasionally breaks away from the steady thumping pace he seems restricted, as if tied by a piece of string to a post, and cannot move past a certain point. This sort of `trussed up` feeling in some of his work adds a lot of fuel to the belief that his guitar work is very limited.
An instrumental, “Embryo”, last little more than twenty seconds and with its Elizabethan feel sounds strangely out of place. The speed and drive of early cuts is continued through “Children Of The Grave”, a blanket-sound that droans on and on with an odd step up or down in tempo with the bass/guitar marriage sounding very close and hard to separate. Again there`s the usual guitar break in fast-fingered, time-honoured tradition from Iommi but he manages to keep away from any obvious Page/Clapton/Lee phrases.

LURKING

Another shortish instrumental opens side two titled “Orchid” with acoustic guitar that`s hard to associate with  the usual relentless purse of the band`s general material which is given its head on once more “Lord Of The World” where Ossie Osbourne gets his best chance so far to show his vocal abilities. Here, for the first time, there`s a spark of the true ability and style the band can show – the old predictable tempo but a nice guitar passage and solidity of bass and drums – lurking just under the skin.
“Solitude” as its title suggests breaks with the expected weight and drive, a soft lyrical track with good vocals and what sounds like a French horn at the back plus a fine piece of electric guitar from Iommi that sounds a lot like Peter Green in style and presentation. But just as you think that you`ve been a little too harsh “Into The Void” looms up with that directness of bass and undercurrent evil. Best of the `heavier` numbers, it can be likened to the controlled tightness that Led Zeppelin managed to produce but it`s spoilt by creeping off into a more stagnant, repetative mire.

ABILITY

But for all the drawbacks, criticisms etc., Black Sabbath, like the Beatles, Cream or whoever, are a band of our time. They`re perhaps not your meat or mine but to those many, many thousands who buy the albums and fill the concert halls they`re a band of their time. And whatever your views about their musical ability or taste of material or direction you`ve got to acknowledge their importance. They, and bands including Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin (perhaps less and less as time goes by) have a role to fill and it`s as important a role as any other in today`s music.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Alun Davies, Roger McGuinn, Rev. Gary Davis, Judy Collins, Ottilie Patterson, Gentle Giant, David Bowie, Moby Grape, Henry McCullough, Marc Bolan, Yes, Led Zeppelin, Family, ELP, Jethro Tull, Grease Band, Osibisa, Strawbs, Pink Floyd, Mimi Farina.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.