Month: December 2017

ARTICLE ABOUT Alice Cooper FROM SOUNDS, October 30, 1971

I will end this years postings with an ancient article about one of my favourite bands/artist. Happy New Year to all the readers of this blog. I hope there will be some interesting reading for you all in 2018 too. Now I`m off to celebrate my birthday in a real rock and roll fashion. I think my friends Jack and Jim will be there!
See you later!

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`Sometimes I need relief from Alice`

By Steve Peacock

Alice Cooper is a group. Alice Cooper is a performer who likes to turn press conferences at London airport into performances. Alice Cooper is also a man who sits in a hotel room, drinking Budweiser beer, and talking about the other two.
Alice Cooper had a hit single in the States and people came to see them expecting a rock group. They got assaulted by a devastating combination of hard rock and freak show outrage. Quickly, they became America`s anti-hero figures. Was this a conscious move?
“It happened, and then we became conscious of it, and we worked on it, sure. Now nobody can say anything against Alice Cooper in the States because the kids will tear the place apart, and we`ve just got more outrageous than ever, and they love it. Now we don`t have to compromise with anybody, we just get to do anything we want.”
But did he ever feel forced to be outrageous when he didn`t want to be?

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“Yeah, that happens. It`s sometimes hard when you have to keep the Alice Cooper image up – sometimes you don`t feel like going out of your way to be totally nuts. Like today at the airport, we`d flown all night and I was so tired, really drawn out. But that`s only 10 per cent of the time – the rest of the time it`s always there, because that`s what we like to do, outrage people and entertain people, and that includes people you`re being interviewed by. We got some nice things going at the airport in the end.
“But I do have to have a relief from Alice every once in a while, because that`s a really overpowering personality.”
Though Alice the performer travels in the suitcase, at least to some extent, did he ever get confused between the two?
“Yeah, well that happened at the airport. I told them that wasn`t Alice there, that was me, but really I was pulling a whole psychological trick on them because it was Alice. I didn`t realise it at the time, but I got home and I realised I`d been lying. Great, I love lying. Alice is a good liar. That`s what`s so good about the whole Alice Cooper thing, you never have to answer to anybody. People say `How come you said that?` and you just say `I was lying`. Alice lies, Alice is like a little brat, travelling around lying.”
Alice the group has been around some time. In 1966, when “there were all these surf groups trying to break into the long-haired Beatle music”. They were playing the teen clubs with songs pinched from the Yardbirds, Them, the original Moody Blues (with Denny Laine), and the Pretty Things. “We used to do all kinds of obscure British stuff that was coming over… finding the weirdest things we could out of Europe to do… it was like an experiment in terror I guess.”

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They used to be able to empty halls with no trouble: “We were going out of our way to be obnoxious to audiences, we used to get so drunk we couldn`t play. I`d wear a pink clown suit, and go on stage and sing two numbers and pass out, right there on stage, I was so drunk. I`d tell the audience to get out, and they would – they loved it, but they left.
“We were notorious, mostly for things we hadn`t done. People were making things up about us and writing about them, because there was a lull in the rock business at the time so they were taking Alice Cooper and making us into this anti-heroic thing. Now that whole negative thing has been changed round and we use the guerilla theatrics on a positive level. All the people that left were coming back and bringing their friends to see us, because it was something to see. And when they came back they loved it because we`d improved the music and worked on the theatrics.”
The music they`ve worked on pretty hard, rehearsing sometimes eight hours a day to get it out right, but the theatrics, says Alice, evolved. Costume ideas came from the film “Barbarella” – a space age extravaganza starring Jane Fonda. “They`re very sexual, emphasising sexual parts… thumbs, knees…” Ideas for the stage act often come from TV: “We get a lot of ideas from old musicals. Fred Astaire musicals and things that you`d never expect to work with rock music. I`m a TV addict… it`s like a source of energy, you plug in to the energy of it. I don`t even turn it off at night, I leave it on just to get the static sound, and then I wake up in the morning and there`s something on, and everything`s good again.”

MURDER

Alice believes the audience is basically masochistic; they`d rather be involved, even if they`re being insulted or degraded, than be merely impressed.
“I have no responsibility at all, I really don`t care what they do. If they all go crazy and throw up at the same time or something, then that`s actually what they`re there for. They don`t go to a rock concert like they go to school, they go to have some fun and they go to be affected. They don`t want to go home and say `I saw a group last night, they were all right,` they want to go home and say, `Wait till you see what I saw tonight man, they had snakes and whips and they scared this person to death… it was great.` I`d rather go and see that kind of thing than a blues group – you can see that any night. But that kind of rock carnival, sideshow thing is something special.
“I`ve always wanted to get a flamethrower and just do the whole audience – that would be a great way to end the act. Mass murder, you`d never have to do anything else, and with all the publicity you`d sell so many albums that you could spend so much money with a lawyer that you`d probably get out of it. `I went crazy, so what!` But we`ll probably never do it, we`ll probably all commit mass suicide on stage. That`ll be the end of the act. Have somebody hired to throw a grenade and… no, no, what am I saying?”
Back in the suitcase, Alice.

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I guess that if Alice reads this interview today he would wish he put a sock in it too. Just like this obscure band, Climax Chicago.

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Rod Stewart, Loudon Wainwright, Family, Duke Ellington, Redbone, Rick Wakeman, The Who, Pink Floyd, Wings, The Flying Burrito Brothers, Chieftains.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Budgie FROM SOUNDS, October 16, 1971

I guess this must be one of the earliest articles written about this band as their first album was released in June the same year.
It is easy to forget that this band, in their most active years between 1971 and 1982 released a total of 10 studio albums. That is quite impressive, and they are, even without a lot of sales success, a part of heavy metal history forever.

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Budgie – freaking good band

By Tom Sutton

Rodger Bain was taking a chance and being very honest when he wrote in the sleeve note of Budgie`s first album:
“They aren`t the world`s greatest composers, they`re not particularly subtle, they`re not progressive (whatever you understand that to mean) – they are a rock band, a freaking good rock band.”
Bain, whose involvement with heavy music began as producer of Black Sabbath, presumably felt compelled to defend Budgie in advance from the inevitable tag of “just another heavy band”. In fact, this Cardiff trio`s album, issued in July, drew a generally favourable reaction from the critics. Variously described as “good nasty, heavy rock” and “unpretentious rock a la Zeppelin”, it has been selling well, too, according to bass player and vocalist Burke Shelley.
Shelley, who formed the group with drummer Ray Philips following their meeting in a Cardiff music shop three years ago, feels strongly that the public still want to hear heavy groups and has no time for those dee-jays and writers who reject perfunctorily all bands who still use plenty of decibels.

SELLING EXCITEMENT

“What people want and what the press and radio think the public want are often two entirely different things,” Burke continued. “Without a doubt, just by record sales and packed concerts, it`s obvious that groups of the Black Sabbath or Deep Purple variety have a huge public following.”
Burke, Ray and lead guitarist Tony Bourge confess to aiming to sell excitement in their stage act, and they do it by means of thundering, riff-laden numbers with such irreverent titles as “Nude Disintegrating Parachutist Woman”, Homicidal Suicidal” and “Guts”. Their next album will go even further, with a crudely titled track “Hot As A Docker`s Armpit”.
Their first album contained two brief snatches of acoustic numbers, breathily sung by Burke. Were they planning to extend their repertoire in this direction at the expense of their rock numbers?
Burke countered: “We don`t have any preconceived ideas about continuing to play heavy, but we`ll only play what we feel like playing and I suspect that it would never be entirely acoustic. Playing good rocking music – that`s what we`ll always like best.”
Budgie`s album was recorded back in February at the fashionable Rockfield studio in the rural depths of Wales. The freedom it afforded helped, says Burke, to create a relaxed mood at the sessions. “The studio is booked by the day rather than the hour, there`s no clock in it, and you can begin and end a day`s session when you like. Everything is so amazingly casual.”
As is evident from the resulting album, Rockfield is an ideal studio for a tough rock sound and the group will be returning there to cut their second album in late November.

SIZEABLE IMPACT

In South Wales, Budgie have long had a strong following, and until shortly before the release of their album they had not ventured far out of Wales for gigs. In recent weeks they have begun working far more extensively throughout Britain and, says Burke, now feel that they are promoting their album simply by regular appearances.
The truth is that Budgie`s album has made a sizeable impact without the inbuilt promotional aid of a packed date sheet. The biggest single factor in its success, they feel, has been the wholehearted support of Luxembourg dee-jay Kid Jensen, who seems to like “adopting” new and otherwise under-exposed groups.
At the beginning of November they go to Austria, Switzerland and France for a fortnight of live dates and a couple of television spots. And there is talk of an early New Year visit to America, where both their album and first single, “Crash Course In Brain Surgery”, have just been issued by MCA.
There are plenty of influences in Budgie`s music – the obvious ones like Zeppelin and Purple, with Tony Bourge`s lead work often bringing Ritchie Blackmore to mind – and as Mr. Bain so disarmingly admits, they ain`t “progressive”. Instead they just pummel out their aggressive, speaker-splitting rock, and seem to be finding plenty of takers.
To quote Rodger Bain once again, he claims they`re probably the first British rock band “to get to grips with the heavy American giants”. And if by that he means Grand Funk Railroad, Budgie should be set to sell a good few albums in the US.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Wishbone Ash, Osibisa, Canned Heat, Stealers Wheel, Sidney Bechet, Centipede, Bruce Rowland, Gong, Gaspar Lawal, Velvet Underground, John Peel, Bobby Bland, Lee Michaels, Redwing, Steeleye Span, Mick Greenwood, Stackridge.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM SOUNDS, September 18, 1971

I know there is a lot of Purple-fans following my blog, and I think they will like this review from Sounds today of the new-at-that-time album “Fireball”. Even if it is not that favourable, it is interesting to read what they thought of it at the time.
Earlier this year I saw the band in my home town and I must say that I was impressed with them. I think that Ian Gillan sings better now than he did 10 years ago. He and the band have adapted – keep away from “Child In Time” and everything is fine. And the band behind Mr. Gillan is what you may call “Seasoned Professionals” – the kind of musicians that is capable of blowing you away with their capabilities both as single instrumentalists and also as a group. You should go see them before they retire as you won`t see many bands of their like in the future.

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Deep Purple: “Fireball”
(Harvest SHVL793)

By Billy Walker

Purple`s place in British rock music is assured, which is just as well because there isn`t too much on “Fireball” that would further their cause, apart from two good tracks “Demon`s Eye” and “Fools”. The feel of the album, apart from these two numbers, is dominated by the drums / bass / guitar heaviness that is almost impossible to escape from with bands in Deep Purple`s musical area. True “Anyone`s Daughter” is a chirpy little ditty with acoustic guitar and piano, but unfortunately it doesn`t work. “Fireball”, the opening track, bursts out from the speakers like a bomb, a breakneck number urged on by Ian Paice`s drums, stabbing guitar and some space-age Lord organ, by comparison “No No No” is quite leisurely, but “Demon`s Eye” rocks better than any of its predecessors. Ian Gillan bares his chest more, Lord Jon lays down some attractive organ parts and guitarist Richie Blackmore gets more of a chance to show his hand, the tranquility and dream-like opening to “Fools” – light organ lines and drums – is shattered by fine old heavy rock bass/drums throbbing and Gillan`s rasping vocals. Add to this Blackmore`s wah wahing guitar and Gillan finally getting up a full head of steam and you have the only other good piece on the album. You can`t help but get the feeling that DP could have come up with something better – there`s no reason why all the tracks couldn`t have been up to the standard of “Demon`s” and “Fools”, the band are capable of it.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: John Lennon, Humble Pie, Soft Machine, Albert Lee, Bob Dylan, Mountain, Elton John, Titanic, Jim Gordon, John Coltrane, Brian Auger, Rankin File, Archie Fisher.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Titanic FROM SOUNDS, September 18, 1971

Many bands outside of the English-speaking countries have at almost all times had an extra challenge in trying to break through worldwide. The language barrier is there for those who doesn`t sing in English, and then there are those who sing with such an accent that it makes it harder for them to be taken seriously.
With an English vocalist, the Norwegian band Titanic shouldn`t have experienced those problems, but still never became a household name. Famous in Norway for having the first international hit for a Norwegian rock-band, the single “Sultana” also made it to No. 5 in the UK. Check it out on Youtube if you never heard it before.

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Titanic – did they sink or were they pushed?

By Billy Walker

Titanic, four Norwegians and a Briton, attempt next week what many “Continental” bands before them have failed to do with any real convictions – make it in Britain. For varying reasons their contemporaries just haven`t made an impact, Burnin` Red Ivanhoe perhaps the only real exception, and they too did not really build up any hard and fast following.
The most obvious disadvantage for any of these bands is the language barrier – the vocalist trying desperately to wrap himself wholeheartedly round English lyrics – and this does have some bearing on a band regardless of their ability as musicians.
But Titanic, French based but working all over Europe may have a trump card in British vocalist Roy Robinson, the rest of the band talk pretty good English and their material is all done in English. This, added to the fact that there`s the need for new faces around now, could help Titanic in their bid over here.
CBS Records are suitably impressed with their property, their single “Sultana” has shown a steady increase in Britain, and so far there are dates at the Marquee (September 20) and the Lyceum (26) and the possibility of a TV spot.

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With this in mind CBS sent over a party of four journalists (including myself) and two CBS representatives to catch the band live in Belgium, not Brussels as you might expect but Hasselt, quite a large and important town that stands on the Demer river and no doubt owes its name to the Belgian romantic poet Andre Henri Constant Van Hasselt.
The Germinal Hall (more shadows of literary genius here) was the chosen venue and Titanic were expected to set sail around 9 in the evening or 21.00 as we know it now, but due to their equipment having to come all the way from Spain (their gig the day before) by road things went pretty much as unexpected from then on. With all these hang ups it was the audience in the tiny, over-crowded and terrifically hot Germinal Hall that felt it most and they showed it later.
I`d seen them streaming into the hall around 7 p.m., there was no supporting act just Titanic and a disco to fill in the time until the band went on stage. The equipment arrived late, the crowd got hotter and less tolerant, the band didn`t go on stage until after 11 p.m. and when they did the amps were far too high and the sound obviously hadn`t been balanced properly.
Despite it all Titanic roared in Santana`s “Soul Sacrifice”, (a band with who they have quite a few musical line-ups consisting of guitar, organ, vocal, drums, timbals) and the audience seemed to like it. “Santa Fhey” (another of their hit singles on the Continent) and “Sultana” got the same sort of response but when the lights in the hall and the band`s equipment fused, it seemed like the straw that broke the camel`s back.

A few pleasantries from stage were met with either dis-interest or heavy expletives in return and although the band were really trying to get things to take off it was without result. The over amplification was such that inside the tiny hall it was hard to separate instruments correctly but from outside they sounded good.
It`s hardly fair to assess the band`s potential in Britain by this performance. The vocalist punishes his voice to incredible lengths to get a really hard rock sound, guitarist Janny sounded, beneath the banks of amps, to have a nice style and the organ really propelled the band along in their Santana-inspired excursions.
But at the Marquee, which has never claimed to be Britain`s most acoustically perfect venue, Titanic should be much more at home and will have the chance to show what they are really about and they`ll sink or swim on their ability. In Hasselt they sank but I think they were pushed a little.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: John Lennon, Humble Pie, Soft Machine, Albert Lee, Bob Dylan, Mountain, Elton John, Jim Gordon, John Coltrane, Brian Auger, Rankin File, Archie Fisher.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Elton John FROM SOUNDS, September 18, 1971

A man capable of composing a song like “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” will always be of interest to this blog, so it is with great pleasure that I give you this early concert review to read.

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ELTON – thrills his audience

By Chuck Pulin

A lady hurricane named Doria which dumped over six inches of rain in the New York area couldn`t dampen the fervour of Reg Dwight or the 8,000 members of the audience who turned out to rave at and over Elton John.
Asbury Park is about a two hour drive south of New York in the state of New Jersey. I would be correct in saying that Brighton and Asbury Park resemble each other. It was there in the neo gothic convention hall built in the 1920s that Elton gave the third concert of his latest American tour.
Having seen Elton at least a half a dozen times in the last few years, I had wondered if I would be bored by his stage performance. Would it lack lustre having gigged so many times in the last year?
I am able to report that Elton has not become dull and his performance on stage is one of the most exciting I`ve seen in recent months. With his mates Dee Murry on bass and Nigel Olsson on his ever expanding drum kit, Elton proceeded to thrill his audience, and got them cheering over and over again.

Dee and Nigel were introduced and finally Elton came out, this time wearing a purple cape, which he doffed revealing his electric green tee shirt and his “Woolworth Bermuda shorts” with high striped socks. Then started with “Friends”, moving into “Ballad Of A Well-Known Gun”, which was followed by “The King Must Die”.
He then asked the musical question “Can I Put You On” and sang a “Song For You”. Other songs were “Country Comfort”, “Honky Tonk Woman” and “Tiny Dancer” from his new LP due out in the first week of November.
“Take Me To The Pilot” was a prelude to a rave up version of “Give Peace A Chance” and in the middle Elton went into a ten minute free form piano riff, which stunned the crowd.
By this time I retreated from the audience to the safety of the stage and watched as Elton danced on the piano with his back to the audience.
Viewing Elton up close in concert is a must. He`s warm and humorous and works hard to please his audience. I am left with the vivid impression that Elton unlike many other musicians LOVES working before his audiences, and tries his damnedest to please the people who come to see him.

It`s hard to put in proper terms the physical excitement he creates and the huge amounts of energy he draws upon. Elton in my humble opinion joins Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, and Leon Russell in that same style of showmanship.
The two sets I saw at the Convention Hall, on August 28 in Asbury Park, topped the sets I`ve seen Elton do at The Fillmore or Carnegie Hall. I can`t ignore Dee and Nigel who have also improved along with Elton. Nigel`s drum kit has grown – but so has his range. The bass lines that Dee quietly plays make him the third important member of the trio.
If it seems that I`m biased about Elton, Dee and Nigel, you`re more than half correct. I would be delighted to be super critical of any band that does not earn your respect or your money. However, you`re safe with Messrs. John-Olsson and Murry. I`m just unhappy that I`ll have to wait perhaps six months to a year to see them perform here in the States again!

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: John Lennon, Humble Pie, Soft Machine, Albert Lee, Bob Dylan, Mountain, Titanic, Jim Gordon, John Coltrane, Brian Auger, Rankin File, Archie Fisher.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.