Month: June 2018

ARTICLE ABOUT Mott The Hoople FROM SOUNDS, February 3, 1973

This is a really good one, not only for Hoople and Ian Hunter-fans, but also quite a bit about their relation with David Bowie. Sort of ambivalent it strikes me reading this. Band member Verden Allen would actually quit the band, as it was revealed in the next edition of Sounds. Have fun reading this old article!

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Mott: Punk rock rolls back

an exclusive interview by Cameron Crowe on the west coast

It`s a delicate business being involved with David Bowie,” explains Mott The Hoople lead-singer Ian Hunter, while soaking in the California sun by an all-American Holiday Inn pool. “We want to maintain a group personality, yet at the same time we`re grateful to Bowie for having given us the hit that`s helped a lot.
“Bowie`s so big, though, you get people making observations such as… he`s taking us over… we`re one of his extensions… he`s using us. It`s just total crap. Rubbish.”
Mott The Hoople are in a bit of a dilemma, you see. Hit singles can be dangerous things, and while the success of “All The Young Dudes” brought to the band their well-deserved recognition, it also may have carried with it a definite stereo-type.

VICTIMS

After a lengthy existence spanning three years and five albums, Mott have suddenly found themselves the victims of their association with fellow-Englishman, David Bowie. Bowie, who convinced the band to re-form (and also wrote the title track and produced Mott`s newest album, “All The Young Dudes”) is also responsible for creating the image that he has “taken the band under his wing”. According to Hunter, nothing could be further from the truth.
“We`ve always been like we are now… I`m amazed at this photo of Edgar Winter (on Winter`s new album “They Only Come Out At Night”) because anybody with an ounce of sense should know that the glamour and glitter thing is just the same as the flower-power thing. Pink Floyd came out of it and Bowie`s gonna come out of it. Nobody else is gonna come out alive.
“I mean, even if we wanted to, which we don`t, it would be almost suicidal to go out for all of it. I`m like a lumberjack, I wouldn`t look anything but ridiculous if I came on stage looking like Bowie. Everybody in this band is your ace heterosexual straight.”
The whole story of how the band met up with Bowie, broke-up, re-formed and recorded “Dudes” all begins last April.

RELIEF

“We`d had about enough,” admits Hunter in retrospect. “We broke the band up in Switzerland. We owed twenty-three grand and were having difficulties with our record company. So we got this demo tape from David Bowie in the mail one day, and it was `Suffragette City`, he`d sent it because he`d liked the band.”
Hunter pauses a moment to adjust his biker-like sunglasses and reconsider the ramifications of that last statement. “I don`t actually think he was particularly into the band,” he continues, “He just liked what we represented. I think we were about the first punk rock band to come out of England. He likes that sort of thing.
“Overend, our bass player, sent the tape back to David, along with a note explaining that we`d broken up. Bowie went mad. He was on the phone with Overend for about two hours trying to convince him that the band should stay together. In the meantime, the rest of us were having a party. All the pressure was off. We were finished with Mott The Hoople, and it was a great relief.”
“Bowie came over to see us about three hours after he`d hung up with Overend. During the interim period, he`d written `All The Young Dudes`, which was about the way David viewed the band and our image. He had already booked some time at Olympic Studios for us and asked us to just get together for the session.” Hunter pauses again, this time for effect.
“When we got to the studios,” he picks up, “it was just like magic. We needed a kick up the ass, and after that session it was just like the beginning again. We decided to stay together.”

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Now under the management of Tony DeFries, the shrewd Colonel Parker behind Bowie and Iggy Pop, the band is now starting to work their way out of financial pressures, the factor that caused them to temporarily disband in the first place.
Another beneficial event was their signing to CBS Records only seven months ago. Now the only major obstacle remaining is to get out of that David Bowie shadow, a difficult feat, to say the least.
Hunter`s vocals are the most distinguishing characteristic of Mott The Hoople`s music and with the “All The Young Dudes” LP, it has grown quite Bowiesque, or so it seems.
“If you listen carefully to the earlier albums,” Hunter contends, “you`ll see that my voice has always been the same. It`s been the treatment of it that`s changed its sound. I`d always wanted presence on the voice. I listened to American music.. Randy Newman, I listened to Dylan on `Nashville Skyline` where the vocal sound is just incredible. The presence is just amazing.
“I just never had it myself… I knew it was there in the studio, but they won`t help you. You`ve got to know what you want.
“I did all the vocals for `Brain Capers` in two hours. With David, I found the sound I`d always been looking for… a first repeat echo. That`s the sound I`ll continue to use.

Hunter has always tended more towards the semi-spoken, semi-vocal treatment in his material. “Dudes” was far from the first quasi-narrative the band has performed. On “Brain Capers”, the band`s last album, Dion`s “Your Own Backyard” contained an almost identical vocal line.
“I guess I`ve always leaned towards that type of thing, you`re right. That`s where the whole Dylan thing came in…”
“Mott The Hoople”, the group`s debut album (released several years ago) unveiled a very much Dylan influenced band. Hunter`s vocals all matched, missed-note for missed-note, that of the Dylan of that period in time. As one astute reviewer noted, “It was an exact replica of the whole `country pie` scene.”
“… I always tended to slide down at the end of notes because I knew I couldn`t hold them. So, obviously, that`s where the parallel was going to be… with Dylan, because he also slid down at the end of notes. So does Sonny Bono… Lou Reed… David Bowie. But that doesn`t mean that I sat down and studied them because I didn`t.
“It was just that I`d never been able to sing; I`d wanted to, and here was my chance. With singers like Randy Newman and Leonard Cohen, I knew I stood a chance.”
After the release of that first Mott LP, the band, through their many British appearances, began to rack up a substantial following and went on to record “Mad Shadows”… a more consistently rocking album than its predecessor.
“`Mad Shadows` is the album you`ll find the most fanatical Mott fans behind,” reveals Hunter between sips of Mott`s Apple Juice. (An ardent fan sent the band a case of the drink after their extremely successful appearance at the Los Angeles Palladium.)
“We never wanted to be that rough… and we didn`t think we were that rough. It just came out that way. You wouldn`t believe what was going on while we were recording `Mad Shadows`.”
The interviewer takes the bait. “What was happening?” he asks.

POLITE

“We wrecked the studio,” answers Verden Allen, Mott`s organist. “I don`t know, we were in a hell of a mess… and it came out on the album. The songs were pretty good on that one, but if you listen to the production work on it…”
By the time Mott appears in America again there will be a new album and single, also produced by Bowie and a new stage act to boot. Sit tight. Mott The Hoople have come a long way, and still have a long way to go, but all the signs point to Ian Hunter, Verden Allen, Overend Watts and Buffin sticking it out.
“This is your ace-diplomatic band,” Hunter states looking over at his fellow band members. “That`s why it`s taken us so long. If one of us freaks out for six months, we all have to wait for him. We`re too polite to say something.”
Mott The Hoople. They`ve been wanting to do this for years.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Neil Hubbard, Yoko Ono, Pussy, Jan Akkerman, David Gates, Moody Blues, Al Stewart, Atomic Rooster, Savoy Brown, Gentle Giant, John Martin, Esperanto, Captain Beefheart, Rolling Stones, Spartacus, Tom Paxton, Eric Andersen, Amazing Blondel.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Alice Cooper FROM SOUNDS, January 27, 1973

Some very interesting revelations at the end of this one. Where are those tapes and will they ever be released?
I would love to hear the original “Hollywood Vampires”, or a version of it, playing Elvis and doing other interesting musical excursions. Time to release those tapes, Alice? Vince? Steeeeveeen? 🙂

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Alice`s golden age…

The Killer phones from New York to thank SOUNDS readers for his Poll wins and tells Steve Peacock about his latest `sickening` show

It`s sixty degrees in the afternoon in New York, and Alice Cooper reckons the fact you can go around without a coat in New York in January is about the most exciting thing that`s happening there. That and Bette Midler.
Alice has been off the road for two months, finishing off the new album “Billion Dollar Babies” and getting the new stage show ready. And he`s bored. “God,” he crackled over an echoey trans-atlantic phone line, “I`m just going crazy. I`ve been going out to bars every night and getting blind drunk.”

AWARDS

They still have the big house up in Connecticut, but Alice has moved back into the city – “I was coming in here every night anyway, so I thought I might as well move in.”
He`d phoned basically to thanks SOUNDS readers for voting them so high in the poll. “Hey, I really have to thank you people for all the awards,” he said, with all the breathless excitement of an unsuspecting Oscar winner, “we really didn`t expect anything like that. The guys just picked up the paper and went `What….?`
“I think there are going to be a lot of groups coming up now who`re going to be doing like Hollywood publicity stunts. I like the idea of that because I think it brings a lot more theatre into the rock business and I think the next five years is going to be the time when stars will be born – personality stars.
“I mean, have you seen Bette Midler? She puts on such an incredible show, she`s as good as Barbra Streisand. I hope she doesn`t mind being compared to Barbra Streisand, but she really is that good on stage.
“And I think we`re going to see a lot more glamour in the rock business – real glamour like you used to get in Hollywood in the 30s when all the stars created their own, very individual images. It seems like the doldrums period we went through in the rock business for a while is over now.”

STYLE

Though rock never really has had anything that approached the golden age of Hollywood has it? It was more that there was a style of star that people followed – Elvis, Beatles, Stones – than a cluster of very distinctive personalities.
“Yeah, I guess so – you only ever really had maybe two personalities, one Beatles and one Rolling Stones and everyone else latched on to one of those. But I think it`s going to happen now.”
But for Alice Cooper, the next few months at least look set for some heavy work. There`s a new stage act ready, and they`re going to take that on the road right through the States for three months, and then back to New York either to go on Broadway, or for a week at Madison Square Garden. Then Europe. What had happened to the “Alice At The Palace” Broadway show idea?
“I get about three calls a day about that – it`s really up in the air at the moment – it`s on, it`s off, it`s on… so I think what we`ll do is take this show out and cover the country in three months, and then put it on Broadway when we get back if we can, otherwise a week at Madison Square Garden.
“The new show has some really sickening things in it, so we`re dividing it up into three acts related to colours more or less – white, black and red – so people don`t have to take too much all at once. And we`re going to be using about six times the lighting we`ve ever used before, and travelling with 30 technicians – it`s really going to be an extravaganza.”

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SICK?

What was there in it that was so sick? “Listen – there`s one scene in it that`s so sick even you`ll cringe. It`ll make brave men shiver. I was talking to this magician who`d seen it, and he thought something had gone wrong – I can`t go into the specifics because I don`t want to let the cat out of the bag – but he thought something had broken and the guy really was dead at the end of it.
“The new show`s going to be more `Billion Dollar Babies` than any of the other albums, because we`re getting pretty tired of doing a lot of those old songs – `I`m Eighteen` and things like that – but then I guess we may have to do them still because people really scream out if you don`t.
“But by the time we get to Europe we should have a whole new thing to listen to – we`re going to be using a mellotron and things like that, more of a production.” Would they be using extra musicians? “Yeah, but I don`t know who yet; we just want to get some different sounds instead of just the five musicians – like the Stones use Price and those guys, but on a slightly different level because these guys will be older. 45-50-year-old musicians.”

And then there`s the album itself. Donovan`s on the title track, singing the second and fourth verses and doing a kind of dialogue with Alice. “He`s really one of the nicest guys I`ve ever met in my life,” said Alice. “He was down at the studios in London and I went along to some of his sessions and asked him if he wanted to come along. We just got drunk together, you know? Which is not odd at all.”
Then there`s “Hello Hooray” which is the new single – a ballad, and the only song on the album they didn`t write. “There are a couple of real rockers on the album we could have used, but I really wanted this one out as a single because it`s another direction, another whole aspect of what we can do.” And there`s a song that includes guitar parts from the “I Spy” theme, and from “Goldfinger”, and a song called “I Love The Dead” about a necrophiliac.
What had happened to the sessions in London with Nilsson and Keith Moon and Marc Bolan and Flo and Eddie and Rick Grech? “We`re going to save those because they were on a different idea to what we were doing on this album. They were mostly old Elvis songs.
“And we did a half-hour version of `Coconuts`. A dirty version.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Pink Floyd, Tony McPhee, Rick Wakeman, John Martyn, Graeme Edge, Jimmy Karstein, Stevie Wonder, Roxy Music, Colin Blunstone, Jerry Lee Lewis, Todd Rundgren, Gerry Lockran, Stomu Yamash`ta, Alan White, Bob Henrit.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Rick Wakeman (Yes) FROM SOUNDS, January 27, 1973

The story of Wakeman`s first solo album and a little bit about Yes. Worth a read! 🙂
Enjoy!

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The six wives of a Yes man

Penny Valentine talks to Rick Wakeman

Rick Wakeman was on a plane when the idea came to him. Now you may not think being 25,000 feet in the air between Richmond, Virginia, and Chicago a very good place for inspiration to strike – but stranger things have happened on vast musical treks across the USA, and that`s a fact.
Anyway there was Wakeman with a choice before him. As he has a healthy terror of flying he was either going to get drunk or read. And as he didn`t feel much like arriving at Chicago to be thrown head-first into a ton of black coffee, he somewhat surprisingly chose the latter.
With his reading choice at Richmond airport slightly nullified to yet another book on 49 positions, he embarked clutching “The Private Lives Of Henry VIII” – why, he`ll never know, as he`s always hated history.

EXTENSION

But he did and it`s just as well for – like all good stories – this has a happy ending in that it brought our keyboard man extraordinaire to a decision that materialises next week in the release of his first ever solo album, suitably titled “The Six Wives Of Henry VIII”.
The album – on which Wakeman plays everything from moog to harpsichord – brings to life a musical tapestry of the individual personalities of the six tormented and colourful ladies of the court. And it`s timing and content is healthily aimed at yet another extension of Yes and all Wakeman has brought to that band since he joined two years ago.

TRACKS

The idea for a solo album started way back in the latter part of 1971 – just after Rick had put down the tracks for his first Yes album “Fragile”. Contracted as he was to A & M through his time with the Strawbs, Wakeman was to come up with so many albums over a period of five years.
Recording separately for Atlantic with Yes, his position became comparable to that of Rod Stewart`s arrangement with the Faces. The only problem was the increasing difficulty Wakeman had in setting down any tracks he liked:
“I wanted to do an album without vocals because I can`t sing. Well,” he says, screwing up his face, “I can sing but there`s more to it than simply singing in tune. I can`t write lyrics either. Dirty poems yes, lyrics no. So I wanted to take pieces of music and build them up.
“We came back from the first American tour and I was very depressed. It was a good tour for them, but I`d played badly and I was pretty miserable. I thought the best thing was to go into the studios and do some tracks and cheer myself up.”

GLOOM

The result, it transpired, was anything but cheering. Rick took the tapes home, listened to them, and sunk in gloom that one would certainly never associate him with:
“The numbers just weren`t going anywhere, they could have been for a detergent commercial. I really began to panic. I thought `I can`t do an album of any consequence`. What I`d done would have detracted from Yes and wouldn`t have helped me at all. And it was very important for me that this album would be the best I could contribute, and done to the best of my ability.
“But when I opened that book on the second tour I started reading about Katerine of Aragon, and this first theme I`d laid down earlier came into my head. It sounds daft but it really was a surge of excitement, because suddenly I`d found a concept which was what I`d always needed but hadn`t realised. After that it all seemed much easier.”
In February 1972 Wakeman was back in the studios. That year was a heavy one for Yes, full of touring – eight months in the States to start with – and Wakeman`s recording schedule dragged on.
Finally he gave himself a solid two weeks, and last October with musician mates like Dave Cousins and Dave Lambert from the Strawbs; Squires, Bruford and Howe from Yes; and Alan White, he finally completed the work.

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DISTORT

“The real advantage of having laid down those first early tracks was that I could see exactly what musicians I needed – people that would enjoy just playing one piece each. I think of all the `wives` Jane Seymour present me with the worst problems because she was so different to all the others.
“In the end I decided to use the church organ at St. Giles, Cripplegate. I`d used it for some parts of `Close To The Edge` and I wanted to go back to record just one chord for Anne of Cleeves – she goes a bit bonkers and I wanted to distort the organ chord. It was lovely when I cut the Jane Seymour track there, the rain pattering on the roof, nice atmosphere.”
In the end result Wakeman, not wanting to make Seymour too ethereal or religious, has broken up the track by putting unexpected flashes of drum, moog and harpsichord where you least expect it. Now the two-year suffering is over, Wakeman is obviously very proud of his album – the only sad note being that it`s unlikely any of its content will be included in Yes`s stage act. An odd fact when you consider how closely much of it is aligned to what the band do.
However, Mr. Wakeman can be seen with his silver cloak flashing in the lights on various TV programmes, and the pressure of time on the band is such that it`s doubtful anyone would have much time to rehearse the new material – especially with a new Yes album about to be cut this summer.

Meanwhile what plans for Yes? Well, they`re currently mixing the live triple album and then they scoot off on their “world tour” of – as Wakeman puts it – “Neasden, Grimsby and Cleethorpes,” although, in fact, it takes in such places as Japan and Australia, both new concert markets for the band:
“That`s one of the reasons for the live album – certainly not because `Close To The Edge` was a difficult one to follow, no, no,” Wakeman shakes that long mane emphatically. “Although `Fragile` and `Edge` both did very well in Australia and Japan, they`re both places we`ve never done concerts in before and we felt it was important for people to really hear what we did on stage. I think we`ll be doing some British dates towards the autumn.
“You know, I had this great idea about renting the Rainbow for a week and laying on special trains from all the other cities, to bring people down and take them back. We have a lot of technical problems touring in England, getting the equipment set up at the right place in time. I thought it was a great idea because it would mean we were assured of a good sound system for one thing, which is very important for the band. But it got blown out – shame really.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Pink Floyd, Tony McPhee, Alice Cooper, John Martyn, Graeme Edge, Jimmy Karstein, Stevie Wonder, Roxy Music, Colin Blunstone, Jerry Lee Lewis, Todd Rundgren, Gerry Lockran, Stomu Yamash`ta, Alan White, Bob Henrit.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Uriah Heep FROM SOUNDS, January 13, 1973

Another useful review for people to dissect. I am now looking forward to a month of football, but I will try to keep this blog running as usual in between games, household chores and work.

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Live concert review

By Tim McKenna

Three thousand fans arrived at London`s Rainbow Theatre on Sunday to see Uriah Heep, which was almost a shame for Silverhead, the opening support act. However, despite antagonising an already unsympathetic crowd by being late, they managed to slowly swing the atmosphere into their favour with their direct brand of soul-based rock and roll.
With the audience still warm, Uriah had little to do but whip them to near hysteria by the end of the evening, which they did comfortably. Until then we had heard them play, not particularly spectacularly, tracks from three of their albums, the new one “Magician`s Birthday,” “Demons and Wizards”, and “Look At Yourself”.
They chose a heavy set opening with a piece from “Magician`s Birthday” and also included “July Morning”, “Gypsy” and “Tears In My Eyes”. At times the choice was too heavy and it was a relief to hear the uptempo “Sweet Lorraine”, “Look At Yourself”, and “Love Machine”.
“Gypsy” in fact was leavened by a devious solo from Ken Hensley, incorporating a three part organ and mini moog solo which began with a moog interval sounding at times like the scraping of steel on porcelain. He continued the solo with a Bach-type organ recital and ended it with a “Caravan” trip on the moog, along with Lee Kerslake`s drums.
Ken also took lead guitar on “Tears In My Eyes”, but after a promising start, it tailed off into a dismal undirected mass of sound, plodding along without mystery, interest or precision. Nevertheless, Heep freaks were jiving in the shadows like plants from another galaxy and were no doubt encouraged by seeing bassist Gary Thain riding on singer David Byron`s back as he knelt on the floor.
Earlier, “July Morning” from “Look At Yourself” had trodden much the same path though David Byron`s humorous inflections saved it from disaster.
Yet, for Heep, it was a spectacularly successful evening. Perhaps it was because they were on home territory for the first time for some while. But whatever it was, when Byron asked everyone to stand up and clap along to their closer, “Look At Yourself”, they did – and they didn`t sit down again, just stood yelling and screaming for more.

 

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Fairport Convention, Ronnie Wood, Jon Hiseman, Pentangle, Claire Hamill, Ray Davies, Al Kooper, Procol Harum, Hemlock, Graham Bell, Elton John, Brinsley Schwarz, Martyn Wyndham-Read, John Peel, Uriah Heep.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

ARTICLE ABOUT Status Quo FROM SOUNDS, January 13, 1973

Just a short one today as I know some people use these concert reviews in many ways. Some may read them doing research for books on the touring history of a band, and others use them to check if their bootleg is complete or just to discuss certain episodes happening at a certain concert. There may be other reasons that I can`t think of right now, but imagine this could be sort of useful for some people. So more of these will be coming.

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Live concert review

By Jerry Gilbert / Ray Telford

Status Quo and the JSD Band did well to fill the Rainbow on Saturday, and it was highly encouraging to see diametrically opposed factions whacking out their own steamy rock and roll to a full house who were perpetually off their seats dancing.
For the JSD Band the concert was an enormous success and signified their enormous popularity since coming down from Scotland last year. When it comes down to it, even London audiences will react with body and soul to good medleys of jigs and reels, and on the night front men Des Coffield, Sean O`Rourke and young fiddler Lindsay Scott, were brilliantly fast and in perfect harmony.
Status Quo`s performance finally installed them as this year`s most likely contenders for the quick trip to the big time in the same way as Slade did last year.
This, however, was precisely what Status Quo fans had come to hear – a hard faced rock band who played to them on their own level with no glittery showbiz pretentions. In fact, the group represents exactly the opposite for their dress evokes strong memories of those halcyon days of a million dusty blues bands, and their audience communication is summed up neatly in the way Mike Rossi delivers his energy laden rough talk between numbers.

The same goes for their music, too, for it comprises a powerful barrage of rugged riffs pumped out onto two guitars in the handling of Rossi and Ricky Parfitt above an aggressive sounding rhythm section. Alan Lancaster on bass and John Coughlan, drums, do a fairly solid job, but they lack a certain crispness in their tempos which lessens the overall effect of the music.
One of the most popular numbers in the set was “Railroad” which Rossi sang with amazing verve above the surging waves of instrumental power. It`s music that you simply can`t knock because its effectiveness portrayed itself in the stomping, jeering audience who refused to let the group leave the stage until three encores had been played.

 

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Fairport Convention, Ronnie Wood, Jon Hiseman, Pentangle, Claire Hamill, Ray Davies, Al Kooper, Procol Harum, Hemlock, Graham Bell, Elton John, Brinsley Schwarz, Martyn Wyndham-Read, John Peel, Uriah Heep.