Month: July 2018

ARTICLE ABOUT Peter Gabriel (Genesis) FROM SOUNDS, March 3, 1973

A lot of people like this version of Genesis a lot better than what they became later. I see them as almost two separate bands, with Gabriel they were sort of a progressive art-rock band, without him they became a more melodic rock band. Both versions of the band are fine in their own right. Enjoy this one, the last from this issue of Sounds – an issue which were full of riches to explore. On to the next one….

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Gabriel – Living out a surrealist fantasy

By Jerry Gilbert

Peter Gabriel personifies first the surrealist evil that lurks within “Clockwork Orange”, and then the sweet bizarre innocence of Lewis Carroll`s Alice.
The whole issue of camped up stage drama in A.D. 1973 is beginning to portend something patholigical, by and large. The credibility gap of the presentation and its inability to tax the real imagination – these are the problems too often encountered and too rarely overcome.
Maybe the Genesis approach has been different – perhaps they`ve gained from taking the slow winding road to the top of the hill without being sidetracked into any of the Messaenic hyperbole that so many of their contemporaries have chosen.

TANGIBLE

The band`s new stage act, I dare say, transcends just about everything that has come under the portrayal of surrealistic art in an eminently tangible rock form. The band live beyond the seven-year cycle that determines the course of rock music fads and their communicative level is on purely a fantasy level, using as its medium tragi-comedy, quasiallegory, and at its most extreme points life and death as humorous transient sequences rather than states of being.
Peter Gabriel`s visions of life and death are paradoxical; his theory is that music provides visual images – and if that music reaches the theatre then those images can be acted out. In short, you are taken on the unknown voyage of 2001 while Peter Gabriel personifies first the surrealist evil that lurks within “Clockwork Orange”, and then the sweet bizarre innocence of Lewis Carrol`s Alice.
Backstage Alice was taking off her final coat of make up, the metamorphosis revealing Peter Gabriel, suddenly the quiet, self-effacing public school boy who would at first seem the vicarious victim of such a vigorous expression as Genesis send forth except for the fact that he can handle it all superbly.
Offstage he dresses soberly and would be entirely unassuming but for the shaved forehead which would seem to indicate that he is affiliated to some weird religious order.

In the light of such a stage extravaganza did Peter feel that the “Foxtrot” album could stand up on its own merits, stripped of all the trimmings, without providing something of an anti-climax?
“Well we`ve never been entirely satisfied with the album and the music relies heavily on capturing the entire atmosphere on record – we didn`t capture the atmosphere we could have done but we can on stage with our visual presentation,” Gabriel explained.
Prior to the tour Genesis spent long hours in the Rainbow, meticulously taking their existing act and moving it slightly off-centre so that it distorts. The revamped act is little more than a series of clever nuances, save for the obvious introduction of headdresses, but the impact is immediate.
“I think we have enough visual links now that once people see the band the imagery will wash over into the record anyway,” Peter went on. “For instance, I think `Yellow Submarine` provided visual images for people listening to those songs afterwards – things like `Northern Song`.”
Does it matter that the audience are by and large unable to grasp the significance of Gabriel`s personal symbolism? He didn`t think so: “For instance, I like some of Eliot`s poetry and you can spend years looking up his symbolism and cross references if you want to and you might end up with quite a lot of assorted information, but I don`t think you get any more pleasure out of it than if you understand any of the references.”

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DETAIL

Then the serious expression gave way to a grin: “But I do like to have the detail there so that if anyone did want to spend their life rooting around the lyrics, they could find it and it would be like a little paper chase for them, you know, very unnecessary but great fun.”
`Supper`s Ready` is the composition that moves through more physical and allegorical sequences than most – pieced together as a single concept it could parallel a Bosch creation but with the added dimension of time.
“We`ve never taken anything as bulky as “Supper`s Ready` on the road before and we find that when we take things out that we`ve done a lot of work on they are generally such that you can`t hold an audience during certain sections, but what`s pleased us is that audiences on this tour have been willing to listen to all of it.”
I asked Peter whether the band felt comfortable about undertaking such a tour so soon after the one with Lindisfarne, and whether they were affected psychologically by the prospect of returning to the same venues – this time as a headline act.
“It`s only really been strange playing here in Newcastle again, but on the whole we`ve been very, very pleased, because we didn`t know how many places we could fill. We seem to have accumulated much more power than we had a few months ago.”
He explained that the band was used to headlining as they have been broken in on the European circuit. In Italy they are acclaimed as vociferously as they`re ever likely to be in England.
“With our own backcloth now it`s different – there are no speakers visible, we wanted to make the whole thing more personal but strangely very few people have remarked on it although they are usually very aware of the presence of stacks.”
This has helped to levitate the entire credibility of such a creation – the band, shielded by their backprop emerge as though on a dias, and the elimination of such eyesores as speakers assists the audience greatly in accepting their position within Genesis` ephemeral world.
“But people have become much more involved in the fantasies,” insisted Gabriel as though deeming the whole thing worthwhile. “From people who have talked to us they are becoming totally surrounded by it although other people will be left stone cold.”

EYESORES

Then Peter proceeded to outline plans for a new all-embracing project, the concept of which has already been evolved, and when it finds the right environment it`s going to remove its audience totally from any natural habitat and place them in a strange cosmic situation. He was reluctant to divulge the essence of the concept as a venue has not been determined, but the effect it is certain to create is staggering.
“At the moment we are still limited with what we can put across, but with plan x, let`s call it, we will be able to get a lot more across, built out of certain energies, and provide them with the right emphasis.”
“The thing is,” Peter went on, “we`re still not happy with the lighting situation. We had the Who`s lighting guys giving us technical advice and it can be used well as we learn more ourselves about colour.”
So presumably the Genesis road crew would shortly be expanding? “Yes, I do think this will be happening unfortunately. I don`t like the idea of having a touring troupe, but the thing is once we agree on the conception of an idea, then we don`t want to have to worry about the technical difficulties – I think it`s inevitable that the more efficient you become the more organisation you require and therefore more money.”

PLOUGH

But as far as Genesis are concerned their money is already spent. “We want to plough any money we make from gigs right back into the presentation of the show… and we want to do this ad infinitum. We want to do the very best we can on stage and make our money on the records.”
Inevitably this will lead to a dichotomy in the band`s material for they will surely visualise albums and stage productions as entirely different concepts in the future and channel their music accordingly.
“Yes, because we still primarily see ourselves as songwriters which may seem a bit strange – but it`s a writer`s approach to visuals rather than a performer`s.
“What`s important to us now is to do what we`re doing in this country in the States. Unfortunately at first that means taking what you can get including the top band pulling out your power point when they think you`re going down too well. We may decide to just take in towns where the album has done well and do them on our own.”
By May or June Genesis will be back in the recording studios; Gabriel already has some ideas worked out for it (yet to get the affirmation of the rest of the group). And judging from the frame of mind he`s in at present you`d better expect something stunning.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Darryl Way (Curved Air), Sounds staff analyse David Bowie, Nazareth, Steve Marriott, Average White Band, Elton John, Geordie, Status Quo, Slade, Stackridge, Thin Lizzy, Mike Heron, Jesse Winchester.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Blue Oyster Cult FROM SOUNDS, March 3, 1973

The first of many Blue Oyster Cult albums got a “warm” welcome at Sounds. B.Ö.C didn`t let this stand in the way of fame and fortune and carried on to have a great career. By the way, I really don`t know why Mr. Hayman didn`t comment on the fantastic song title: “She’s as Beautiful as a Foot”. If ever there was a great song title….

Well, I`m off to Stockholm for a few days. Guess I will visit some record stores and otherwise have fun. See you around!

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Album review:

Blue Oyster Cult
(CBS 64904)

By Martin Hayman

This is the much-vaunted American band composed, I believe, of rock and roll critics – and certainly championed by them as THE underground band. Its cult appeal has been carefully fostered, and if this is what happens when the men who write the reviews get behind the instruments, then I can only say: Back to your typewriters! It`s a dense, hard, riffy music without great finesse… but then finesse is not what punk-rock is about, I suppose. Lead guitarist Donald Roeser wails away over some powerful, churning rhythms from a thick, unsubtle rhythm section. There appear to be three guitarists and it all gets a bit overbearing at times, though really there are some nice touches – “Then Came The Last Days Of May” is based on a pleasing idea and when they tone it down, give each other some room, exploit the use of space a little, then the music becomes quite acceptable. “Redeemed” is nice, with more intelligent use of dynamics, but most of the rest is undistinguished, like trying to tell the difference between being hit on the head with a ten-pound hammer and a twenty-pound hammer – either way it gets to you. This album was recorded way back in October 1971, though it has only just been released by CBS, so I would imagine most of the people who wanted it would have it by now. I don`t want to give the impression that this is a rotten album – the playing never drops below competent, but it`s the competence of slightly outdated heavy-psychedelic rock or whatever, as indicated by the hippy-trippy name. Maybe it`s meant to be a bit of a joke, and as for the bit about the critics… actually they are probably all musicians doing the best they can, but there`s a score of British bands who have got albums out who can better this. Put it down to a White Elephant Craze.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Darryl Way (Curved Air), Sounds staff analyse David Bowie, Nazareth, Steve Marriott, Average White Band, Elton John, Geordie, Status Quo, Slade, Stackridge, Peter Gabriel, Mike Heron, Jesse Winchester, Thin Lizzy.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Alice Cooper FROM SOUNDS, March 3, 1973

This “review” of one of the classic Cooper albums could have almost been written without listening to it. I`m not sure if Mr. Peacock did as most of the information he shares in this “review” could have been found freely and easily on the album cover and inlay sheet. But this was also Sounds review of this great album – here for you to digest and share or whatever… I`m off to Stockholm tomorrow – see you around next time!

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Album Review:

Alice Cooper: “Billion Dollar Babies”
(Warner Brothers K56013).

By Steve Peacock

Like Pete Townshend once said, you can`t go wrong copying the Rolling Stones. Take a couple of tracks like “Raped And Freezin`” or “Generation Landslide” off this latest episode in the escapist melodrama of the Alice Cooper story, and you`ll see how it fits. Alice and the boys use that heavy r`n`b, the chunking guitars, and the voices well back in the mix approach that has made so many records great, add their own touches of all-American trash culture tune their images carefully to the violent fantasies of the teenage west and come up with a great album. “Roll out! Roll out with your American dream and its recruits… roll out your circus freaks and hula hoops” sings Alice on the opening cut “Hello Hooray”; “Brats in battalions were ruling the streets” is one of the lines in “Generation Landslide”, a classic kids-rule-the-world number; “Raped And Freezin`” concerns a young hitchin` guy who gets picked up, screwed, and left naked, alone and freezin` down in Mexico by “some old broad down from Santa Fe” who was no baby sitter; “Elected” has everything but the lead vocal (sing along, they`ve printed out the words), “Billion Dollar Babies” has Donovan, “Unfinished Sweet”, a dental horror tale – “he says my teeth are OK but my gums got to go” – ends up with More Mr. Nice Guy” concerns the traumas of a man you love to hate, “Sick Things” and “Mary-Ann” I won`t spoil for you by a giveaway, and “I Love The Dead” I`ll leave to your imaginations – it is as sick as the title suggests, and it`s a great number. Bob Ezrin`s production is snappy and clever, the melodrama heaves in and out, sometimes hinted, sometimes heavily to the for, and the whole thing is as effective as a really slickly made Hammer film, with the accent on the ham. The packaging is gaudy, brash, and designed with a neat sense of outrage – and I suppose that goes for the whole of the record. The ideal Alice Cooper album.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Darryl Way (Curved Air), Sounds staff analyse David Bowie, Nazareth, Steve Marriott, Average White Band, Elton John, Geordie, Status Quo, Slade, Stackridge, Peter Gabriel, Mike Heron, Jesse Winchester, Thin Lizzy.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Thin Lizzy FROM SOUNDS, March 3, 1973

This one is interesting. By looking at the photo and seeing who is interviewed it seems that Mr. Lizzy himself, Phil Lynott, took a backseat in the early days of the band. Strange for someone who was so important to this  band. The other thing is the fact that this was the last album that Mr. Bell would feature on, even if he talked  about “things working out nicely” and so on… That`s how fast things can change in rock and roll and in life itself.

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Lizzy`s coming on real strong

By Ray Telford

“A group like Slade have the power to change an audience around to their way of thinking whereas most other bands are happy to go the way audiences want them to without really making too much of an effort to keep their identity.”
So says Thin Lizzy`s quiet spoken guitar player Eric Bell and that`s the conclusion he came to after Lizzy`s recent UK tour with Slade during which they played most of the country`s prestige gigs. Eric reckons the experience the band culled through the tour to be priceless, both in terms of audience exposure and learning how to handle capacity audiences – and no one draws bigger and more enthusiastic audiences than Slade these days.
There`s little doubt, too, that Thin Lizzy`s jaunt round the concert halls with Slade gave their current single, “Whisky In The Jar”, the push needed to make it a top ten entry. In fact the song, a traditional Irish drinking ballad, was recorded by Lizzy some time before Christmas and lay dormant for about three months, despite relentless plugging, Eric says, on Kid Jenson`s Radio Luxembourg show, and only started its climb up the charts about midway through the tour: “I think it`s pretty obvious that it was the tour that finally got the single in the charts. We`d thought that it could be a hit record at the time we recorded it but then we were in a kind of rut, gig wise. I mean we were just playing the normal rock circuit and we were doing the number on stage and it always got good reactions but not enough people heard it at one time. The tour definitely gave it the exposure it needed.”

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Thin Lizzy were formed in Belfast around two and a half years ago and their story is a familiar one to almost every rock band who ever came out of Ireland. The group, apart from Eric, comprises Phil Lynott, bass and vocals and drummer Brian Downey, all of whom served their time with various showbands and other non-descript rock bands before getting together.
The group came to London for the first time around eighteen months ago to record their first album for Decca since when they recorded a second and infinitely better album, called “Shades Of A Blue Orphanage”, released in April last year. Both records received cool reviews from most critics and Eric says the criticisms levelled at them were in many ways justified:
“Everything we`ve recorded to date has been done in one mad rush and we just haven`t been given the time to really put down on an album all the things we wanted to. I think, too, in some ways the group have suffered in the past because we couldn`t afford the time to rehearse.”
Lizzy`s third album, which they`re due to begin work on within the next couple of weeks, Eric says will certainly be more carefully put together than the other two and they have also been more selective in their choice of material.

“Another thing that touring with Slade taught us was the importance of a strong stage act. When we first came to London we tended to just get on stage and play for ourselves. We`d get into long free-blown things which sounded nice to us but that attitude doesn`t really wash any more. It used to but not now. We weren`t communicating with the people we played to though there was communication enough in the band. There`s a lot more to rock and roll than just playing it.
“We`ve been together long enough now to get the energy of the band across and I know we`re doing that OK. It`s just a case of getting together a strong stage presence and combining it with what`s already there. It`s working out nicely, too.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Darryl Way (Curved Air), Sounds staff analyse David Bowie, Nazareth, Steve Marriott, Average White Band, Elton John, Geordie, Status Quo, Slade, Stackridge, Peter Gabriel, Mike Heron, Jesse Winchester.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Slade FROM SOUNDS, March 3, 1973

I think there may be a lesson or two when it comes to songwriting in this one. Many bands have been tempted to shake things up a bit in their career and do something else than they usually do musically. Quite often they fail, if not musically, so at least among their fans. Never change a winning team, they say, and in many ways this is very true for musical artists with one or two exceptions. Most should follow Slade`s lead on this one.
Until next time… have a good read!

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Now`s the time for Slade

By Steve Peacock

“There`s a line in it that says `So you think my singing`s out of time, well it makes me money,`” says Noddy Holder, pausing to take in the effect of his words. And then he laughs.
`It` is “Cum On, Feel The Noize”, Slade`s new single, and is the reason that they were sitting around in a small dressing room at BBC TV centre last week, waiting for the technicians of Top Of The Pops to sort out some problems with Olivia Newton-John and the orchestra before the programme`s run-through started.
around showing off his Australian sun-tan – “actually it pissed with rain half the time we were over there” – and the anecdotes were flowing free. (This text started like this in the paper – not a mistake – Blog ed.)
A man from Scene and Heard bustles in clutching a tape recorder and asks them to do a quick trailer or two for the programme. Noddy shouts one into the mike – “This is Noddy Holder from Slade, we want you to listen to Scene and Heard because we listen to Scene and Heard, all right (crescendo) awrightawrightawrightawright! Keep On Rocking!” – and then he, Dave and Jimmy make up a couple of ditties based on Slade singles and bellow them into the mike with Nod strumming on acoustic.

TARTAN

They get a call that they`re on soon, and as Nod dons striped socks, tartan trews, tartan waistcoat and top hat to match. Dave disappears into the washroom to deck himself out in his latest creation. There`s a sudden hush as he re-appears, and the whole room dissolves in hysterics: he`s wearing a long black robe with mirrors stuck all over it, silver trousers underneath, and a kind of wire mesh headdress, silver, with more mirrors, that fastens under his chin. He looks like a Busby Berkely nun, and when someone stops laughing long enough to say he ought to be auditioning for a part in “The Sound Of Music”, he looks mock-hurt: “I was trying to look like Cleopatra.”
Listen he says as the helpless cackling starts to die away, “You write `em, I`ll sell `em.” A chorus of groans and “You`ve used that one before,” greets that one, and they`re off down the corridor into the cavenous studio for the run-through.
Watching on the monitors, it`s quickly apparent that the cameras can`t handle the reflected glare from all Dave`s mirrors – every time they turn on him the screen fills with dazzle. Back to the dressing room, manager Chas Chandler says he`ll have to strip it down a bit, and Dave looks suitably distressed.

ROCKING

There can be no doubt these days that Slade are stomping right to the top of the heap – a tight, exciting, fun rock band who`ve got the business of hit-singling, hit-albuming and sell-out concerting down to a fine art. They`re not breaking any frontiers of music, and they don`t much want to, but they`re rocking on, having a great time, and honing themselves up into one of the tightest and most expert rock bands we`ve ever had.
“The new single,” says Nod, “was made in much the same way as all the others – we went for a good commercial sound, and what we tried to get was something with a good singalong chorus. It`s got a lot more chords in it than we usually use – you can actually play it on Spanish guitars and it sounds just as good – and a strong melody, and I think it`s very easily remembered. It goes back to something we used to do a lot in a way, because we tried to use a lot of ringing chords, play them high up on the neck with a lot of open strings so they ring out.”
At its basic approach, “Cum On Feel The Noize” is quite obviously well in the traditional Slade mould, and they`re happy about that: “You can`t escape certain aspects of our singles,” says Dave. “I mean this one is very obviously Slade, and I don`t think you have to make a direct difference in your approach just because it`s your next single. You`ve got to keep it well within the vein of what`s being enjoyed nowadays, which is to get up and sing and really get on with it.”
Which is what they do, and the combination of enjoying what they`re doing at the moment and being successful with it, gives them little incentive to think about drastically changing their music. Though they hurry to point out that they`re not being complacent.

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“We are progressing in many ways,” says Nod, “we`re getting better on stage, and in the studio we`re getting more relaxed and beginning to understand the techniques of recording better, and I think we`re writing better songs all the time. We don`t feel the style is getting worn at all, we just want to make it better all the time, adding ideas, and seeing what comes out of it all; what changes are coming will come gradually.”
As a guitarist, did Dave ever feel he needed more space to stretch himself? “No,” he said emphatically. “I think what I do inside the numbers is right at the moment. There are a lot of things I could do if I wanted to be a clever dick, but I think it would be pretty pointless.”
Nod: “The whole band works towards the vocals and the melody, and if anything cuts across that we scotch it. What we try to do at the moment is to make everything in the band complement the melody and the vocals – we don`t have to try to blow each other off or anything.”
Dave: “We haven`t got to prove anything to each other, we know exactly what we`re doing and what we can do.”
Nod: “We were listening to our very first album `Play It Loud` the other day, and the arrangements on it… just nothing complemented anything else. What we`ve been doing is simplifying everything down, so that you`ve got the bass and the drums keeping the rhythm going, and a strong melody, and then anything else you put in is really the icing on the cake.

“There are lots of things we can still use – like the violin, we`ve only used that on `Coz I Luv You` so far, so, we`ve got that to use still, and there`s vocal harmony which we used to do a lot, but we haven`t used much for a while. So we`ve got plenty of things still in the can that we can draw on.
“People in the business keep saying we ought to change soon because people will get sick of us, but the fact is that people aren`t getting sick of us – we`re selling more records every time we bring one out. The `Slayed` album sold as many in two weeks as `Slade Alive` did in nine months that it was in the charts, so things like that prove to us that we`re going the right way.”
What would happen if it came to a time when – as has happened to so many other groups – Slade wanted to change their music, but the record-buying people wanted them to keep on bashing out the same old story? “You mean if I wasn`t happy playing but people still enjoyed it? I don`t think that point will ever come. I`m happy playing at the moment, but if it ever did… well, we`d have to cross that bridge when we came to it. But I don`t think we`d ever get to the stage where we`d go on and play things we didn`t like just because other people like them.”
And remember, that cuts both ways.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Darryl Way (Curved Air), Sounds staff analyse David Bowie, Nazareth, Steve Marriott, Average White Band, Elton John, Geordie, Status Quo, Thin Lizzy, Stackridge,  Peter Gabriel, Mike Heron, Jesse Winchester.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.