Month: August 2018

ARTICLE ABOUT Grand Funk FROM SOUNDS, October 20, 1973

I don`t think people in Europe realize how incredibly huge this band was in the US and Canada in the period from 1969 until around 1975. They sold regularly to Platinum and even double platinum with their albums, meaning they shifted several million copies in those golden years.
This band is still out on the road in the US with ex-Kiss guitarist Bruce Kulick and Max Carl (a renowned musician for a whole lot of bands/artists) filling the void after Mark Farner who continued his solo career in 1998.
Do yourself a favour and check them out if you can.

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Grand Funk rise from the ashes

Interview by Pete Makowski

Banal and incompetent are just some of the criticisms that have been laid on Grand Funk Railroad. Their first album was dismissed in one paragraph in an American paper and they have been slandered non-stop since their first successful concert at Atlanta right up to the release of “We`re An American Band”, their ninth and best selling release, where the media opened their eyes and recognised the validity of this band – and it`s about time too:
It seems senseless that a band who have – and I`m quoting the publicity handout – broken every existing attendance record in every city they`ve appeared in, including New York, Chicago and Los Angeles have been ignored by the networks and totally massacred by the music press.
They sold out New York`s Shea Stadium in 72 hours; more than 12,000 fans camped out all night to be the first in line for tickets. Five years before it had taken the Beatles 80 days to sell out the same stadium. They grossed a staggering two million dollars in one single 52 day tour.
The prime argument against them is the hype factor which in some ways is justifiable, but if this were completely true then you can dismiss the old adage “You can`t fool all of the people all of the time”.
Personally I credit their success to the situation around them at the time of their inception. There was a new generation of kids in their mid-teens who didn`t particularly turn on to acid or any other forms of hard dope it was more the alcohol and pill scene more commonly known as wine and reds.
They weren`t susceptible to or aware of the music around them, the music didn`t contain the aggression they wanted. So when Mark Farner, Don Brewer and Mel Schacher stepped on stage in Atlanta in 1969 and played a set with the rawness and power the kids were looking for, they were accepted as the new generation`s rock`n`roll saviours.
They turned onto Farner`s frantic stage act as Chuck Berry turned them on two decades ago – a decade later it was Mick Jagger. The new breed of audience hadn`t been associated with their elder`s musical evolvement so this sexually orientated stage performance seemed a whole new thing to them.

IDOLIZE

So what is it about them that enables them to be in such high regard? Firstly, I must admit to the felenous act of being a keen fan of the band and I can honestly say I enjoy listening to their albums. But why? As musicians they can be regarded as competent but they`re definitely no virtuosos, their lyrics are by no means awe inspiring but cannot be condemned as trite, and anyway you rarely get inspiring lyrics in rock and roll. So why do a few million or so people idolise them?
Since the band broke their liaison with Terry Knight, their ex-manager and professed mentor, they have expanded from a three piece to a quartet with addition of old colleague Craig Frost on keyboards. They`ve also become more accessible to the press than when Terry Knight acted as the band`s mouthpiece.
I spoke to Don Brewer, the band`s volatile percussionist, who was lazing in his Detroit apartment and he seemed to be quite excited about the groups new album: “I`m really knocked out with the album, specially with the single getting in the charts, it`s our first hit single.”
The boys have certainly come a long way and their musical history stems back to the pre-psychedelia era, the age of punk rock, when the Electric Prunes` “I Had Too Much To Dream Last Night” and the Standell`s “Dirty Water” were riding high in the charts.
The band were all born and bred in Flint, Michigan, Detroit which has always been recognised for its raucous bands (Alice Cooper, MC 5 and Iggy Pop). Don Brewer played in a band called the Jazzmasters and, as legend goes, Terry Knight a locally famous DJ who quit, spotted the band (who were on the verge of splitting) saw their hidden talents and joined as vocalist.

PENNILESS

Their name was promptly changed to Terry Knight and The Pack. Mark Farner joined temporarily on bass then left to play in Dick Wagner`s Bossmen but after The Pack`s guitarist was given notice to quit Farner rejoined as lead. The band was fairly good as far as punk rock goes and they recorded a couple of albums on Lucky 11 label a subsidiary of Cameo Parkway.
A lot of their songs sounded uncannily like rip offs of old Beatles and Yardbird numbers. Eventually Terry split to pursue a solo career and the Pack tried to make it on their own but found themselves stranded in Cape Cod penniless and hungry.
Terry was playing in a club nearby and when he met up with them decided to manage the boys. They hunted around for a bassist and found Mel Schacher a one-time member of Mark and The Mysterians who made chart success with “99 Tears”. The band signed a whole load of contracts, went into rehearsals and before they knew it were playing Atlanta, a huge venue for a band so young and inexperienced.

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EXPOSURE

They played the gig for free to get a little more exposure and were plunged straight into the deep end, a very risky business. I asked Don how he felt about playing venues so large: “I didn`t like Shea Stadium it was only a promotional concert and it was too big, the acoustics were bad and you couldn`t get close enough to the people.”
Their gigs went so well that their newly acquired company, Capitol, released a single “Time Machine” and followed it up with their debut album “On Time” which sold well. Knight pushed their name in every outlet available and made sure their gig sheet was consistently full, even though they were playing for a mere pittance and travelling in a beaten up old Volkswagen.
It was their third album “Closer To Home” which had the critics screaming `hype`, due to Knight`s huge billboard across Times Square and the way the boys were presented as a peoples band. Then came “Grand Funk Live” which gave the band international recognition they played two successful gigs in England, one being in Hyde Park.
“I really liked the Hyde Park concert,” Don told me. “I was so surprised at the amount of people that came, there`s been a representative from Island from England come over to see us at our latest tour and he wants us to do a British tour. I`d like that, I think the kids would like our new stage act, I think we`ll be over soon.”
After the live album came their most controversial record “Survival” which features renditions of Dave Mason`s “Feelin` Alright” and the Rolling Stones “Gimme Shelter” and it seemed as if the band were mellowing down and this began to win the critics favour. Don recalls the album with some disdain “I don`t play it much, it reminds me of some bad times we were going through personally I prefer “Closer To Home” and the new one.
“Survival`s” sales weren`t high in comparison to the rest although it struck gold and the next album “E Pluribus Funk” reverted back to their old ballsy style. It was at this time – when Funk were reaching the pinnacle of fame, a world tour underway and a film was in the can – that the band split with Knight and the court cases began.
Everyone predicted this as the end of the line for the Railroad and for a while it seemed as if they might be right. Then they released “Phoenix” a title indicating the new start. I asked Don why the band split from Knight:
“I`m afraid I can`t say anything because we`re still fighting court cases and if we say anything it could be used, so all you could use is what has already been written.”

CAMPAIGN

There certainly has been a lot written about the case, easily enough for another article but in condensed form it seems that the band`s whole life was being saturated by Knight`s excessive hype campaign and this was affecting their music as well as introverting their personalities.
But, I hasten to add, the guy must be given his dues, if it wasn`t for all the risks and schemes he undertook for the band they wouldn`t be as big as they are now – although it doesn`t mean they wouldn`t have ever come about.
But to them it`s all past now and they have been given a new lease of life devoid of the past, apart from 55 million dollars worth of court orders.
Mark Farner`s role in the band comes over as the leader. I asked Don if he and Mel felt as if they were just a backing band? “No we felt guilty because Mark had so much responsibility, he had so much to cope with but it`s not like that any more because we come over as band, as Grand Funk.”
Mark has written a lot of socially conscious songs and is concerned with ecology. “Yeah, Mark knows that he`s in a position where kids will listen to him so he feels it`s his responsibility to make them aware of the situation around them but people say `Mark should stop writing pollution songs,` and `Mark should do this,` but he`s really concerned about the situation around him.”
The band must obviously have strong opinions about the press. I asked Don how he felt about the criticisms laid on the group, “It used to get me at first but now I don`t take so much notice of the criticisms although I`m aware of them but I`m more concerned about the people than the press.”
Rightly so, I asked Don what the differences were in the approach of recording “We`re An American Band.” “It was much looser before, we would rehearse and record the albums in a couple of days because of the tight touring schedule. We still recorded the whole album in five days.”
Don describes the band`s music as American funk and explained the whole concept of the album was to show they were just an American band. He blushingly admits to being pleased about the album`s success as he wrote and co-wrote most of the material, including the single.

MANAGER

The band are now being managed by their old road manager Andy Cavaliere. “He`s great, he came in at a rough time and handled the situation really well I mean it must have been hard to make that transition from road manager to manager. “They`ve also acquired a new member Craig Frost on keyboards who was originally intended to be in the band but due to various complications didn`t get round to joining till now although he`s always been closely associated with them.
Funk have also just completed a tour. “The reactions been fantastic,” said the enthusiastic Mr. Brewer, “I never expected it to be as good as this. Right now the band are resting,” Mark at his ranch breeding horses, Mel whose the quitest in the band lives in the woods where he spends most of his time building motorcycles and me I`m the business man of the band I stay in an apartment in the city.”
I asked Don how long the band intended to be around? “We don`t intend to be around for any fixed amount of time it just depends on how long we feel like being Grand Funk as long as it feels right, that`s how long we`ll stay together.”
With their new album and single riding high in the charts and their tours going so well it looks as if Grand Funk aren`t go to be just an overnight sensation. They`ve managed to sustain their gargantuan success up till now and it seems as if the phoenix has risen from its ashes for good and the Railroad`s going to be back for a helluva long time.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Free, Elliot Mazer, Kevin Coyne, Gentle Giant, Yes, Judy Collins, Dr. John, Stackridge, Eumir Deodato, Camel, Jerry Lawson and Jimmy Hayes.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Lynyrd Skynyrd FROM SOUNDS, October 13, 1973

This album review will be liked by every southern rock fan out there, except maybe for the spelling of Ronnie Van Zant`s name. So enjoy!

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Album Review:

“Lynyrd Skynyrd”
(Sounds Of The South MCA 363) Import

By Martin Hayman

This group with the rather tricky name hail from the Southern States of America where, as you know, so much good music has already come. Al Kooper says he saw the group playing in a club in Atlanta, Georgia, and promptly signed them up for his new MCA-backed label Sounds of the South. He told me in a recent interview that Lynyrd Skynyrd play “the most real rock and roll you ever heard” and after listening to their first album, which has had astonishingly widespread airplay across the USA, I must agree absolutely. The shock of hearing this music is comparable to that of first listening to Chuck Berry ten years ago: its strength and crude raunchiness just bowls me over. Not only that, but the purity and the originality of the music, coming as it does straight out of the swamps and subjected to no commercial refinement or adaptation, just straight into the studio and record what they had been playing for years together. Lynyrd Skynyrd are seven men plus various additions. Ron van Zaart is their singer and is co-credited with composing all cuts with either guitarist Gary Rossington or Allen Rossington, also guitar (with guitarist Ed King on one song; along with Al Kooper and drummer Robert Burns on another). There are three guitarists in the band and they swop with ease from lead to rhythm and bass, indicating that each one knows the score: rock and roll is based on rhythm instruments. And they show on the strength of this album that there are few groups around who could even hold a candle to them. Perhaps they might sound a little scrappy by comparison with Redwing or Little Feat; But they make both these groups sound effete, combining their grasp of the feel of blues and country with the sheer energy of our own Status Quo. To check this out I would suggest a listen to the album`s last cut “Free Bird”, opening on a doomy note with piano and organ and impressively thunderous tympani introducing a medium-pace drawling blues with beautiful slide guitar work from Allen Collins admirably underscored by measured rhythm section work, which then takes off to a chugging beat and a guitar solo which gets faster and faster and faster. Just rock and roll played as tough and uncomplexed as it can be; enough to make anyone want to disappear back into the wilds and find out what it`s all about.

Lynyrd

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dave Mattacks, David Crosby, The JSD Band, Phil Manzanera, Status Quo, Jerry Shirley, Sutherland Bros. and Quiver, Jo Jo Gunne, Allan Taylor, Geordie.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Geordie FROM SOUNDS, October 13, 1973

A really good one for fans of Geordie or maybe of Brian Johnson in AC/DC. This one have some interesting thoughts from Brian at the end of the interview.
Band leader Vic Malcolm was the great songwriter of this band and he was still writing great rock music as late as in 2014 with his band called “Dynamite”. If you like no-nonsense rock`n`roll in the style of AC/DC, this is the band for you. Check them out here: https://youtu.be/cOu1BJy4GLk

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Don`t be fooled by the name

By Ray Telford

Brian Johnson, Brian Gibson and Tom Hill when they`re together never stay quiet for very long.
Last week they were assembled at their manager`s office for a swift interview before it was time to go on to Lansdowne recording studios where the finishing touches are being added to the new Geordie album. Absent from the little gathering was the groups mainspring Vic Malcolm who Brian Johnson explained had virtually been living at Lansdowne the past couple of days “Just to make sure everything`s being done right”.
The two Brians and Tom, when they`re in good shape, virtually terrorise their manager`s clerical staff and their young, unsuspecting PR man into fetching cups of tea and satisfactory publicity shots respectively: “If that gets used in the paper Molina, I`ll bloody well sue you”, Tom Hill forewarned the PR man who in turn said nothing but slipped the offending pic into an envelope and handed it over to me to use if I so cared. The whole thing, though, was carried out in good, clean cat and mouse type fun which is the norm whenever any of the Geordie`s are around.
Before being asked to join the group by Vic Malcolm little more than a year ago Brian Johnson had never played a pro gig with a group in his life, though he`d been with a long string of semi-pro Newcastle groups and had got himself a healthy reputation as a rock vocalist: “Vic came to my house one night”, Brian carried on through his undiluted goerdie accent, “He said he liked my singing and all that but he said I just stood there like a sack of tatties. That`s what he said. Anyway, after I joined the whole stage thing came very easy to me. I get up to things on stage now that I`d never dreamed of a couple of years ago.”

It might be a fair guess to say that Geordie`s apparently unbounded enthusiasm and love for the music business could well be down to the fact that they have achieved no mean measure of success in a comparatively short space of time. In the past year, they`ve released four singles, all of which notched up impressive sales: “The first single to break for us, which was `You Can`t Do That`, broke the bottom end of the charts towards the end of last year. At that time we had a lot of really good luck – good gigs, the ones which matter, and after the discos had picked up on the record it spread to the radio and that gave us a lot of exposure.”
Basically Geordie feature mostly Vic Malcolm songs (all the singles have been written by him), and their few diversions into non-group songs have all been given Vic`s arrangements. The immortal “Geordie`s Lost His Liggie” from the first LP, being probably the best example.
“All the songs on the new album,” said Tom Hill, “have been written by Vic, though this time the group have contributed much more in terms of coming up with ideas at recording sessions. The only non-original song we`ve done is “House Of The Rising Sun” which we`re very pleased with. It follows pretty close to the way The Animals did it but our version is a bit heavier – it`s punchier.”
Geordie, much to their disillusionment, still find themselves being compared to Slade more often than they feel is justified. No one disputes the similarity of appeal between the two bands which, when you come to think of it is probably the reason why the two were billed together at a London Palladium concert last year. Of course, at that time Geordie hadn`t yet experienced their first hit. Close listening to the Geordie albums show Vic Malcolm as a talented composer of pop songs plain and simple and his style really is a long way removed from Noddy Holder`s impact which has tended to remain on the same level throughout all the major Slade singles hits. True, the production strokes that are pulled on Geordie`s behalf may discolour the argument but beneath it all they have the feel of a band who deserve their glitter the same as anybody else.

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The next Geordie album following “Don`t Be Fooled By The Name”, Brian J. says, will be a live one. They intend to record it early next year at a gig in Newcastle City Hall, a venue the group have never yet played as their past home appearances have always happened at the cosier Mayfair Ballroom where they have been No. 1 draw for the past year or so.
“A live album,” said Brian, “is something I`ve been looking forward to. There are things we get into on stage musically that have never happened in the studio. There`s this certain song that goes down no bother live but we tried to record for the album last week and I couldn`t hit it. I tried handling it everyway I knew how but it just wasn`t right. Obviously the band is naturally happier playing live than recording, though we record a lot easier than we use to. And to do the live album in Newcastle should be something else.”
Geordie have already had one abortive attempt at an American tour earlier this year. Brian, however, seems in no great rush to reach US audiences because his canny Newcastle common sense tells him: “By all accounts Slade died in America. I hear they went down well in and around New York but outside that area they died. Now if people are comparing us to Slade in this country the chances are we wouldn`t do too good in the States – and that means losing a lot of money.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dave Mattacks, David Crosby, The JSD Band, Phil Manzanera, Status Quo, Jerry Shirley, Sutherland Bros. and Quiver, Jo Jo Gunne, Allan Taylor.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Uriah Heep FROM SOUNDS, September 15, 1973

Uriah Heep`s best-selling album notching up worldwide sales of more than 4 million copies didn`t get a very favourable review in Sounds at the time. With songs as good as “Stealin`” and “Seven Stars” on it, it really didn`t deserve a review as bad as this. I think the reviewer may not have liked them much. But history has now categorically shown him to be wrong.

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Album Review:

Uriah Heep “Sweet Freedom” (Bronze ILPS 9345).

By Pete Erskine

“Demons And Wizards” I think it was. I recall keeping the cover and pinning it on the kitchen wall, but the celluloid contents somehow found themselves sailing over a neighbouring hedge. Can`t think why. T`was a blatantly unprofessional reaction. Presumably, then, it`s still down to a case of being a confirmed fan or a total non-believer. This continues, in my opinion, in similar vein to previous Heep offspring and will therefore reinforce both parties` opinions. It is neither bad nor good – depending, of course, on how you define these terms – remaining simply as a well-polished, carefully packaged selection of all that is truly familiar in rock. And familiarity breeds contempt. David Byron`s vocals are strident and obtrusive. His neo-operatic warble just isn`t natural. He might be a real goer on stage, and that may compensate, but here he just doesn`t cut it. His voice is too harsh. The material and playing is sometimes laboured, mostly predictable, and the lyrics are banal. The sentiment seems to have been, “It doesn`t matter as long as it rhymes”. Lack of originality can have its charms – providing it`s done stylishly. This is just plain embarrassing, and worth another million or two, no doubt.

Uriah

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Roger Daltrey, Roxy Music, Jess Roden, Billy Preston, Nick Mason, Home, Hemlock, Lou Reizner, Commander Cody, Elton John, Rolling Stones, Tony McPhee, America, Martin Carthy, Dale Griffin.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Status Quo FROM SOUNDS, October 13, 1973

A very good and honest interview with Richard Parfitt and Alan Lancaster from what was still an early stage of their career. I really liked this article written by the great Pete Makowski. Enjoy.

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Three phases of Quo

By Pete Makowski

“If you take a look at how many bands were around when we started, how many of them are around now?” This thought provoking question was put forth by Status Quo`s bass guitarist Alan Lancaster and rhythm guitarist Richard Parfitt, and it`s true… how many bands are there in existence who have survived the Jimi Hendrix, Walker Brothers and Englebert Humperdinck package tour era?
Only Quo can boast coming out comparatively unscathed, and they endured a tough ride going through the youth club scene, reaching the highest of highs and the lowest of lows three times still to return in fighting form.
The three phases of Quo began when they made national success with “Pictures Of Matchstick Men”. Remember a pubescent Francis Rossi adorned in that trendy mod gear blasting hell out of those four notes? Then the hair grew longer, the whiskers sprouted and the music got grittier and they made a return to the charts with “In My Chair”, which showed the beginnings of their present day boogie style with those monotone vocals from Mr. Rossi which is still a well known trait for the bands newer material. And now Quo are back stronger than ever, they made their return with a very impressive “Piledriver” and followed that up with an even better “Hello.”

BUTLINS

It was a nice surprise to find the interview was going to be conducted with Richie and Alan because I was expecting to be confronted with Francis and it`s nice to hear what the rest of the boys think. Richard the blond haired bombshell, whose looks have probably left a few damp seats at their gigs, reflected back to those hard times when the band played residences at Butlins and such like places.
“We were green then,” he explained with a bold cockney accent, “we were being conned left, right and centre, we know now, but we had to learn the hard way, which is probably the best way to do it.”
The band have recently returned from an American tour which they were extremely pleased with, not expecting half the reaction they received, and when they weren`t being subjected to strenuous tours they were putting finishing touches to their recently released album leaving a blank period between “Piledriver” and “Hello” meanwhile, Pye, their former record company, rereleased some of their old singles which sold quite a few copies. I wondered if the band felt this harmed them in any way.

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CREDIT

“Obviously we were pissed off, `cause we walked out on them and we want the kids to listen to the new stuff but I must credit them on the singles they chose, they were obviously thinking before they released it.”
“Piledriver”, the album which gave Quo a new lease of life, was a very rugged rock album and a good introductory to what the band were about and like their follow-up they displayed the writing talents of the rest of the band. I asked Richie if he felt “Hello” displayed any state of progression within the band.
“Definitely, we wouldn`t have released it if we felt it wasn`t, it still maintains that Quo feel but it`s more melodic and it`s more the band.” This leads to the question of Mr. Rossi`s position in the band, from live gigs it seems he`s the congenial spokesman, but Richie hastily points out that the vocalist is always the focal point – fair enough – but do the band ever feel repressed in any way?
“No, never, if we felt Francis was taking over we`d pack up tomorrow, but we all have a part in arranging, producing and writing, we`re a family – which may sound corny – but we don`t look at each other as members, it`s a way of life. I can`t imagine what life would be like without Status Quo, I love the band, I love doing what I`m doing, I`m not saying it`s everything I want from life, I don`t want to get heavy about that, but as far as I`m concerned I wouldn`t want to be with any other band.”
But surely if the band plan to be permanently together they would have to eventually change their musical policy? “We`ve all got musical tastes which we`re into and I think that they`ll come out eventually,” said Rick, “but it can only change naturally if it`s not natural we won`t do it,” interjected Alan, the mustachiod brass player. “We`ve found a direction,” continued Rick, “a musical direction we follow but we don`t know where it`s going to yet.”
So Quo are planning to become permanent fixtures but with such a hectic past don`t they have a fear of being abandoned again? “Christ yeah,” exclaimed Rick, “but only from time to time we think `what if it happens again` but the way things are going it looks as if we`ll be here for a long time.”
Do they feel indebted to their loyal followers? “We`re not aiming to be pop stars,” explained Alan, “the first thing we think about is our audience and everything we do we think will they like it? and what`s it going to be like on stage?” Richie continued, “When I sit at home and write a song I try to imagine what it`s like on stage, we do it for the audience and, of course for self satisfaction, you come off stage sometimes and if you haven`t played well you don`t get that warm feeling but when you`ve gone down a storm that`s when you get that feeling.

RESPECT

“We`ve been going a long time and have probably worked harder than any other band,” Alan said, “the amount of work we`ve done and the amount of years we`ve been going we should be rich, `cause we`ve had quite a few record successes as well, most of the money has been put back for things to help us get the sound across. I`m not saying we`re not in it for the money, we are as well, but if we were money grabbers we`d take it and spend all of it.”
Because of their years of hard toil Quo command a high degree of respect and can be credited to the recent rock`n`roll boom, do they feel themselves to be innovaters in any way? “Well, it`ll probably sound conceited,” said Richie blushingly, “but we are aware of that, we do have our own sound you know that.”
With their new album riding high in the charts it looks as if they are going to reach even greater heights but when will they completely lose their insecurity and realise they`ve reached their zenith. Richie pondered for a moment and then expounded. “When we break in the States, if we break there then we can begin to relax a bit more and then the rest of the world! England`s going fairly well but we`ve been playing here for six years so how long is it going to take for the rest of the world?”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dave Mattacks, David Crosby, The JSD Band, Phil Manzanera, Geordie, Jerry Shirley, Sutherland Bros. and Quiver, Jo Jo Gunne, Allan Taylor.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.