Month: November 2018

ARTICLE ABOUT Sweet FROM SOUNDS, January 19, 1974

Some really interesting facts in this article that I just wasn`t aware of. I like it when I get surprised reading all of these older articles.

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Sweet in search of respect

A revealing interview with drummer Mick Tucker by Pete Makowski

WARNING – do not ignore this page.
On seeing the name Sweet, of course, you may have decided that SOUNDS has finally sold out or you may quietly be reaching into the nearest waste paper bin. But wait – the idea of interviewing those glittering veterans of “Top Of The Pops” and “Crackerjack” isn`t as ridiculous as it sounds.
“They reek of hype”, you may say – and you`d be right. They did, and they`re the first to admit it. But `did` is the operative word. Recently, they`ve split from their management and decided to put their destiny into their own hands – so you can expect a few more rough edges from now on.
The band were clustered in their office, listening to a tape of a gig. “Listen”, says Mick Tucker listening to his drum solo, “here comes the Sandy Nelson bit – he could get that sound thirteen years ago.” Hmmm, they know their music. Then their new single “Teenage Rampage”, which is pretty much in the vein of their previous efforts, but rougher and raunchier.
They play on it too; which is more than they did on their first few.

Says Mick: “The backing track was done by session people and we put down the vocals. It sold well and Phil (Wainman their producer) obviously wanted to repeat this as it was his first chart success and session people were put on the next single.
“We were sick, but we were controlled, what could we do? We wanted a hit record. Anyway they said you`ll be able to play on the next single, but they got guys on the backing track. In the end we said, `if we don`t play on  the next record you can all fuck off, there won`t be a Sweet, we`ll disband and re-form again.`
“In the end they said we could do all the playing and the ones we played on (from `Wigwam Bam`) were the best ones and the most successful.”
You`ll remember how “Blockbuster” came soon after “Jean Genie” both having that same E, A riff (which incidently sounds identical to the Yardbirds` “I`m A Man”). Mick explained that “Blockbuster” was written much earlier but they felt their fans weren`t ready for it at that time.
The band were quite experienced before Sweet was formed, especially Andy Scott who was in Scaffold`s backing group, Mayfield`s Mule and The Elastic Band to name a few. Mick joined a band which boasted Ian Gillan on vocals. Steve Priest, the bass player, has had quite a colourful career including sessions with Joe Meek – a name associated with the Tornados.
I asked Mick why the band haven`t done many live gigs as that`s where they won their praise from the press. “We did a few but they were so badly organised, ballrooms and things like that, Niki (Chin) and Mike (Chapman) were ostensibly our managers. But they`re songwriters not managers, they don`t know anything about touring.
“So we looked around and came up with another management company who were efficient but they were the wrong scene for us. They wanted too much money, they wanted just too much of the cake. So it was a case of having a dog and barking yourselves.

“So we had to do the thing ourselves. We wanted to get a stage act together. There was no catalyst, so we had to get in and do it ourselves.”
It must have been strange for a band who were so dependant on their management to be suddenly given this freedom. “Yeh”, Mick said with a sigh of relief, “we all sat down, I remember the feeling, I never felt so free in all my life, coz it was all down to us. We weren`t tied we had a nice little record deal on the side the rest was up to us.
“We sat down and decided how to spend our money. We got the best road crew, thirteen of them, and an IESPA system (which is used by ELP and Beck, Bogert and Appice). I mean what do you need a manager for? The only setbacks were on the administration side and we`ve got an agency to get the gigs.”
In the last interview I read the band were talking about an album about the history of rock and roll they were going to release with a spectacular stage act planned to tie in with it.
“It took a long time to get together, it didn`t really come off. There was a couple of albums out like `Rigor Mortis` and another one and that was basically the same thing so we scrapped the idea.”
What about the new album? “The new album is most of our stuff, to us it`s our first album,” Mick explained. “The albums that we did in the past, well we haven`t done any really. The first one was shit, it was a pop album, all right taken at its face value. And then there was a compilation album on RCA `Sweet`s Biggest Hits` we disagree but that`s another story.”
Will they be writing all their own material? “Chin and Chapman encouraged our writing, they will still be writing our singles until we get a successful album. There has to be a time when Chin and Chapman won`t be writing our songs any more.
“At the moment the band`s going through a `fuck everybody we don`t care` phase. I suppose it`s from repression in the past.
“There isn`t any respect for us, it`s not hip to dig the Sweet.”

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But how do the band expect to command any respect when they haven`t proved their virtuosity? Mick agreed but added, “If there wasn`t any talent in the band and we didn`t like playing we`d probably go `nice one Niki, nice one Ron` carry on writing for us and we`ll do anything you say.
Other plans in the pipeline include Mick`s venture to record a solo drum album and the further development of Mick and Andy`s production management. They already have a band under their wing.
“I found the band and Andy wrote the song. They`re good, like a West coast band, which is a breath of fresh air as far as I`m concerned. Nice rocking, harmony like Steely Dan, obviously the musicianship isn`t as good.”
I asked Mick what he thought of Sweet`s new single? “The flames there, it`s a monster, it`s not my personal favourite but it`s a good single. One thing that surprised me was the fact that the band are enjoying a mammoth success in the States, where they are regarded in the same slot as Deep Purple and other high class rockers?
“The first hit was Little Willy” said Mick obviously happy to talk about it. “On radio play alone it sold two million copies. We then released an album featuring all our B-sides and the reviews were really good, like `nice heavy rock band` which is amazing.
“I know with the act we`ve got when we go over we`ll kill them. I don`t mean that in a conceited way, I`m glad to say it`s what we want.” Their new album is coming out to coincide with their March tour. “God willing,” said Mick, “we have no problems with singles as we make the money for RCA, it`s a shame but whose going to give any new unestablished band forty thousand singles?
“Over the past six months that we`ve taken over management we`ve spent money and worked our balls off. We`ve got to shake off the stigma of our early hits. Nobody will respect the band till that happens.”

I asked Mick if the band were going to bury the past and pave a new road? “We`re going to stop doing TV shows. Programmes we did in the early days like `Lift Off` gave our first TV slot so we were in their debt so we went back.”
It seems logical that a band of good musicians who have been trussed up like turkey and sold to the highest bidder would revolt against it if they had any respect for their craft.
You can only take so much and this was probably Sweet`s predicament highlighting the fact that they were still in the age of the big star maker. No one apart from them knows how much they were manipulated but the fact is they do now want to make music.
We can`t judge them until they`ve displayed their goods but then again we can`t condemn them. They feel that they are stuck in the middle but feel that it`s also worthwhile: “We`re all good musicians but we could never get it together. We had to own up in the end, we`ll still have hit records. We want people to come and see the Sweet and that`s what it`s all about.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Dylan, Jethro Tull, Bryan Ferry, Chris Squire, Rick Wakeman, Paul Butterfield, Nazareth, Tim Hardin, Average White Band, Cozy Powell, Robin Dransfield, Andy Roberts.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Rick Wakeman FROM SOUNDS, January 19, 1974

Talking about his not yet released live album being recorded the day before this magazine article were printed, it should be fun to read for all of his fans. I don`t think everyone realizes how big Yes and Rick Wakeman was at the time, but I would like to point out that this album went to number one in the UK and to number three on the Billboard 200 chart. So have yourself a listen to this album who were voted number 55 by the magazine Prog in the 100 greatest Prog albums of all time.

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Journey To The Centre Of The Earth

Steve Peacock previews Rick Wakeman`s new solo project

It`s strange – Rick Wakeman joined Yes just after I`d come to the conclusion that they were one of the most stylish and entertaining bands I`d seen, and at the time, after witnessing what I thought was a thoroughly flash and superficial solo during one of their sets, I wondered just how much he was going to contribute to the band.
These days, because of the way he`s developed as a musician rather than merely a deft-fingered technician and because of the way Yes have moved in their musical concepts, I find I`m more in sympathy with him than with the rest of the group. He also has a refreshingly irreverant attitude towards the weightier matters of life, a defiant grease-and-beans view of macro-food, and prefers alcohol to orange juice.
Yet he lives and breathes his music as much as any man, has a broad overall concept of music as both the realisation of personal dreams and ideas and as a medium which must entertain and be understood by people if it is to work, and is almost over-anxious to ensure that people have everything they need to enjoy what he does – right to the hilt.
His first solo project, an album based around the lives of Henry VIII`s six wives, was roundly denounced as baloney by the critics – except by our own dear Penny Valentine. “She said in effect she didn`t understand it,” he says. “Which is great – I wish other critics could be that honest.”

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But the feeling that people aren`t given as much help as they should be to understand what he, and other people, are up to has led him to make extravagant arrangements for his new solo project. “Journey To The Centre Of The Earth” which gets its premiere at the Royal Festival Hall on Friday.
The music has been written on the inspiration of Jules Verne`s book, and will be performed by Rick, a five piece band formed specially for the occasion, the London Symphony Orchestra, and the English Chamber Choir. The piece is 40 minutes long, and will be recorded for an album.
But he feels that merely to perform a new piece of music, however spectacular, is possibly not enough; he had reservations about the recent Yes tour, where they performed the four sides of what he wickedly refers to as “Toby`s Graphic Go-Kart” straight to audiences who`d not heard a note of it before.
“It`s a bit like baking a huge cake that no one`s ever tasted before and asking them to eat it all at once,” he says, and it`s an approach that he`s doing his utmost to avoid with the “Journey” concert. For a start he has a built-in advantage in that a lot of people will probably be familiar with the story anyway – either from Verne`s book or from the film which was made of it; but he`s presenting the concert with the maximum number of props in an attempt to “help the audience to be as involved in what`s happening as the musicians are.
“So many group things are so self indulgent these days, and I suppose that inevitably to get up on stage and play your own music, especially something like this, is self-indulgent anyway; but you can do that and still try to make sure everyone understands what you`re doing and why.”
To this end, he`s using a number of clips from the film says with unarguable logic. What it is then is a piece of music, inspired by a book that excited him when he first read it, that he wrote for the instruments that he felt suited the feel of the passages best.

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Sometimes the orchestra plays alone, sometimes the group plays alone, sometimes instruments from the group are used in juxtaposition with orchestral instruments to create a specific effect – electric piano and strings, for instance, or the rough-edged voices of Wild Turkey`s Gary Pickford Hopkins and Warhorse`s Ashley Holt contrasted with the rich precision of the English Chamber Choir. In only one section does the full force of electric rock band combine with the orchestra and choir, and that is the ever-crescendoing climax of the whole piece.
He also resisted the temptation to fill the stage for his solo concert with a host of well-known Friends: his only experience of that kind of scene was the recent “Tommy” show at the Rainbow, which left him less than enthusiastic about that way of working. Instead he`s recruited friends from the old days of playing Top Rank ballrooms, and musicians he`s worked with or seen work who he feels will be more interested in performing the piece well than in the loon potential of the evening.
Alongside the two singers are Mike Egan, guitar, Barney James, drums, and Roger Newall, bass. “We`ve done a lot of rehearsing, ten or twelve hours a day, but it hasn`t seemed particularly like hard work. We`re all boozers and lunatics anyway and we`ve managed to get through a lot of work in a sort of light-hearted way.
The idea for “Journey To The Centre Of The Earth” has been around a few years, and he actually started writing the music as long ago as 1971 – before Henry VIII. The Henry project, he says, was a rather more hurried thing, basically building the album from the basis of a number of discrete ideas, while this one was conceived as a whole, but has had to wait until now for the adequate money and pulling power to do it properly. “The book knocked me out when I first read it,” he says, “and then I re-read it and decided how easily it could be put to music.”
Obviously, in 40 minutes the actual story-telling is a trifle on the skeletal side, so what he`s done is to allow the bones of the story to come through the narration, and to be more impressionistic with the music. Specific incidents such as the battle with a sea monster, are highlighted with passages of their own.
Equally obviously, the money to stage such a production (and when you`re talking about employing a top-flight 100-piece orchestra, a 60-voice choir, film projection and the rest, you`re talking about costs of more than £22,000 for just two shows) has come through his involvement with Yes. He couldn`t have done it two years ago, which is why he didn`t.

PLANS

He now plans to take the whole show on the road – provincial cities in Britain, America, Japan – later this year. How does that affect his future involvement with Yes? “We`re doing a tour of the States in February, and then I think we`ll all take some time to do solo projects. I know Steve has got a lot of music he wants to get out, and Chris the same, and I presume the others have as well. So if after the American tour we find we have three months in which people are going to do things outside the band, before we do the next tour or album or whatever, then I`ll grab the chance with both hands.
“I think it`s important to the survival of the band that that does happen – everyone in any band is frustrated in some way, and those frustrations have to be worked out. Yes has always been very much a band, rather than a group of individuals, and I think it`s time we did some things outside Yes so we can go back with fresh ideas.”
Did he feel Yes had become rather incestuous? “I really don`t know. When you`re so close to something, it`s very difficult to tell. You have to rely on what other people tell you.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Dylan, Jethro Tull, Bryan Ferry, Chris Squire, Nazareth, Paul Butterfield, Sweet, Tim Hardin, Average White Band, Cozy Powell, Robin Dransfield, Andy Roberts.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Chris Squire (Yes) FROM SOUNDS, January 19, 1974

Always a pleasure to give you an article with this excellent band and their excellent bass player and founder.
Hope you find it as good as I did.

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Hello Squire!

Interview by Pete Erskine

Mr. Goodwin, a well known publicist is on the phone. “They would like,” he is saying, “to answer some of the criticism they`ve received in the press. They`re not angry,” he continues, “in fact, someone else want to see them the other day and he`d written a really bad review and he was amazed that they didn`t seem to mind.”
They really don`t; well, Chris Squire doesn`t, why should he? “Tales Of Topographic Oceans” went gold, representation of a genuine advance order in excess of 250,000, before it even reached the shops.
Squire`s personal attitude to the album is slightly inscrutible.
“On the whole,” he says mildly, “I`m really happy with it. It was like an ever-opening flower as it went along… it just seemed to develop. I mean, playing it and learning the words was like something opening up to me; it wasn`t as if anyone started with a clear conception of what it might turn out like. Jon probably had the clearest vision…
“I honestly couldn`t expect anyone to attempt a review after only having heard it a few times because there is so much in it. It`s not as if there`s been a lot of works like it in the past to relate back to. In many ways the manner in which it developed was a surprise to us. It was an eye-opener. The whole thing seemed to have a strong force behind it. We all felt it but none of us knew what it was. We simply let ourselves be carried along by it to the point where we couldn`t take it any further so we had to wrap it up.
“I think, too, that you have to be involved with Jon`s style to begin to understand his lyrics. You said you didn`t understand the lyrics but I don`t think it that important to get anything across in terms of message. It`s far more important to begin to make people think for themselves.”

Having spent several days attempting to digest the work the only impression I seem to get, is a recurring one of someone tossing a jigsaw into the air and recording the pieces as and where they fall. Squire admits the album is “subtle” while others prefer to describe it as “fragmented”.
“Can you really see it as an overall concept?” I wonder.
“Yes, I can now, I think it`s a powerful work, it`s a double album and yet it is far more than twice as intense as `Close To The Edge`.
“It is eighty minutes long and there`s an awful lot of relating to do. Different sections have got to be heard so many times for you to ascertain any kind of link between them. For example side one and side three are interlinked by identical melodies although they might be manifested in different ways. A phrase in one section might be hinted at again in a different form in another; even I didn`t begin to see those things until much later.
“It may sound egotistical but critics don`t worry me a bit. My attitude is that if they fail to understand now, then I sincerely hope they will later. Someone read me a letter sent in to a music paper by some guy who said he`d always dug us, bought all the albums and so on and that he`d bought the new one, taken it home and played it over and over again and just couldn`t get into it…”
Subjectivity aside, I still think that if Miles Davis and Chick Corea, for example, are supposedly “over the public`s head” then how come a large section can readily devour the complexities of current Yes? Is part of it little more than intellectual snobbery, which feeds on the old “chosen few” sentiment, which of course, thrives in direct proportion to the resistance it encounters?

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“Quite possibly,” Squires muses, “I can`t really say yes or no on that one. All I can say is that I don`t believe those things are without foundation – there will always be a percentage who pretend, but, perhaps, even if they start with the wrong attitude they might learn in the end – at least they`re playing the album so in time they might even come to appreciate it. Or else their perverse attitude might turn others on to it.
“From my own point of view the only statement I can make, as a musician, is to say that I think musicians do play for themselves, whatever they might say, and for me `Topographic Oceans` has been a source of personal satisfaction; I haven`t felt as strongly about any of our albums since `The Yes Album` when Steve joined us – then there was a feeling that we were toying with the unknown; but with that album we created a statement which was prially resolved in `Fragile`. That was our first US album and then we made `Close To The Edge` and that was another `searching` album; that`s been the pattern with us – we ask a question or series of questions with one album and seem to answer them with the next. There`s always a `searching` album before the really positive one.
“`The Yes Album` and `Tales Of Topographic Oceans` have been the two album high-points for me, maybe not so much in the intrinsic qualities of the music itself, perhaps more in terms of a feeling captivated.”
The opposing school of thought has always said rock music should be instant and disposable – the throw-away thing it perhaps really is.
Squire concedes that Yes are probably not really a rock band at all.
“Everyone has to have influences,” he says, “gleaned from every kind of source. Some are content to listen to what`s gone before and keep it going, not deviating much from the accepted line. But it is hard for people to accept new things. One should be ready to accept everything that comes along and in that way one can`t help but gain.

“Every member of Yes has gained from making `Topographic Oceans` although in some ways it was a heavy task, but that`s the point; any slightly heavy experience endured is going to increase your knowledge.”
Originally it had been intended to find a suitable situation for recording the album in a custom built studio. Producer Eddie Offord had various plans but none materialised. Even so, rather than return to the familiar surroundings of Advision, the band opted for Morgan Studios and began constructing the piece last May starting with eight weeks of intensive rehearsals leading into the studio proper in July. It could possibly have been the most carefully prepared album in history, which may or may not be a good thing.
It surely has been a surprisingly tense experience, though. It`s rare to encounter anyone nowadays with complete faith in himself and what he`s doing; so rare, in fact, that it seems quite un-natural like being stopped on the street by the automated Jesus freak with the glazed eye and wan smile; blissed-out – Squire appears to be slightly so. There`s a kind of quiet zeal in him. It is certain that he regards the new album as something spiritual because of the amount of faith he has in it that people will understand it, if not at this point in time, then at least in the near future. Correct me, but I`ve always been sort of wary of blind faith, perhaps it`s not truly “blind”, but in the sense of being too heavily involved in one thing and one thing alone… to the exclusion of almost everything else; perhaps Yes`s music has become too personalised, too inward-looking for it to be anything but frigid and slightly distant.
The interview, as such, stumbles off on a tangent. For example, Squire attributes the supposed shortage of good US music to the upsurge in the popularity of the nasal habit (it`s spoon-size folks). Sly seems to have profited by it, he opines, but mostly it`s just another facet of unfulfilled talent becoming prematurely eroded. Other names spring to mind. Squire also laments the demise of the clubs, as does everybody, seemingly, and the lack  of space within the business for new talent unless it is heavily subsidised (in which case it is invariably relegated to hype).

“The whole economic advancement has affected the business because it`s taken the action out of the little clubs which was where rock and roll always stemmed from in those times, and it`s taken it into vast arenas and closed circuit TV and I suppose this generation is growing up with different ideas and identities.
“The scene definitely needs livening up… but in a way bands like us are just as guilty of playing along with the game and I`m sure people can see it from that point of view, but on the other hand if a gig arena is a thing to go and play in, and if that is where the business is nowadays then we can only try and make the best possible use of that kind of media, by investing as much as we can in sound equipment and a total investment in the whole ideal of music. We`re therefore trying to bring those kind of bigger events into the close-knit situation where the audience can identify with the band. Despite everything I feel that Yes are getting closer to the audience all the time.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Dylan, Jethro Tull, Bryan Ferry, Nazareth, Rick Wakeman, Paul Butterfield, Sweet, Tim Hardin, Average White Band, Cozy Powell, Robin Dransfield, Andy Roberts.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth FROM SOUNDS, January 19, 1974

This interview was done just before the band travelled to make an album that would end up having one of their most striking album covers, Rampant, released in late April 1974.
The only cover version on this album was “Shapes of Things”, a song that would be “Nazarethified” so much that most people think of it as the band`s own, being a live favourite throughout the years. The album would go to number 1 in Austria and peak at number 3 in my home country Norway, being their best position in the charts of any album released here.

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Shapes of things to come

Jerry Gilbert talks to Nazareth`s Manny Charlton

Manny Charlton is most concerned about Nazareth`s next album. On the eve of the band`s departure to Switzerland he was busy sorting through demo tapes to be played to producer Roger Glover once they all arrived in Montreux to start work on yet another album.
He regards the speed with which the band churn out albums as being essential, not so much for their own peace of mind as to fulfil their contract but at the same time he is very wary as to the direction the next progression should take the band.
This time, it`ll be an all original album which is already 98 per cent complete. The band may then decide to make up with the Yardbirds` “Shapes Of Things” or “There`s A Riot Going On” or even write another track themselves – for the album has been specifically designed to feature new group material.
“I think there will be a widening of the spectrum, doing things that we haven`t done before. We want to be a bit more adventurous, to incorporate the British feel and aggression with the American musicianship. Imagine Little Feat material done by Led Zeppelin, well that`s the sort of thing we`re after”.
After cutting their last two albums at the Gangy in Jamestown, Scotland, they have been forced to move to Montreux late in the day because of the energy crisis. They will be spending two weeks at the Montreux Concert Centre with the Stones Mobile, and with the material mostly in the can, they are hoping for a fairly straightforward time.

“We like to have a good idea of what it`s going to sound like so we do all the demos at home – then we just hope that when we get down to record it, it all comes together but we find that if we have a sketch of it before we go into the studios then Roger Glover will probably add some ideas”.
Manny admitted that it was difficult hitting a two album a year schedule, and as a result their five week Christmas holiday back home in Dunfermline was used as a solid writing and rehearsing period from midday until five, eight until one in the morning.
Once in Switzerland they`ll be anxious to get back to Britain and rehearse a new stage act for the States. By May they`ll be back touring England to coincide with the release of the album which is as yet untitled.
The irony of it all is that the tightness of their schedule prevents them from doing any gigs in Switzerland, which is not only a country that the band have yet to play but also a place where “Loud & Proud” has hit the number one spot.
“Making albums just gets harder all the time because our standards are continually rising”, says Manny, and perhaps the band still aren`t regarded with the kind of musical respect that they deserve. “I do tend to think that people regard us as just another rock band”, he acquiesced. “OK we`re not the Mahavishnu Orchestra but I think we`re pretty competent.

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“Four or five years ago people would have thought a lot more of us, but even so I don`t think we`re classed like Geordie”.
How did he see his own tastes influencing the band musically? Manny is adamant about the bands he likes, and they mostly hail from the States. “I`ve been listening a lot to Joe Walsh lately and I think he`s the ideal musician. I`d love Nazareth to get to the same position as Joe Walsh or Little Feat because we really want to combine good songs with good playing. In terms of solos onstage I like to play a solo as long as it isn`t indulgent. I`m not up there to play guitar to myself and the band feel like that too – we`re just not that type of band, and besides, most of the solos are tightly rehearsed”.
In the meantime the band continue to move up the ladder in the States.
“Let`s just say we`re making progress”, Manny cut in circumspectly. “I think the time has passed when Americans welcome British bands with open arms, so we`re having to work hard. At the same time we don`t want to lose what progress we`ve made in Britain – we don`t want to become like TYA where we`re never in the country”.
In the interim, Mooncrest will be issuing a single of the band – and it will probably be a song written largely by Manny called “Castles In The Sand”. Says Manny: “It`s a Buddy Holly kind of thing along the lines of `Peggy Sue`. We specifically didn`t want this one to be on the album but if it`s a really big single the record company and management will be tempted to put it on the album because singles sell albums”.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Dylan, Jethro Tull, Bryan Ferry, Chris Squire, Rick Wakeman, Paul Butterfield, Sweet, Tim Hardin, Average White Band, Cozy Powell, Robin Dransfield, Andy Roberts.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.