Month: January 2019

ARTICLE ABOUT The Who FROM SOUNDS, July 20, 1974

When it comes to Rock Operas, it is difficult not to the mention the Who. Due to their success with those, they became a very visual band and that led them into the world of film. Here is a report from the set of “Tommy”.

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Jolly Roger

Penny Valentine meets the most expensive prop any film ever had, Roger Daltrey.

In about an hour`s time Roger Daltrey, attired in nothing more protective than a loin cloth that closely resembles a baby`s nappy, will be pinned inside a silver iron maiden and have over 100 butterflies crawling and fluttering all over him.
Right now it`s lunch break on the set of “Tommy”, Ken Russell`s latest extravaganza, and Daltrey – the man who humbly calls himself “the most expensive prop any film ever had” – is incongerously merry in his dressing room at the Ladbroke Grove film studios.
There aren`t too many people that, faced with the prospect of “things” crawling all over their bodies could lash into a steak with as much relish as Daltrey is now, or indeed be laughing about it at all. But then filming the Who`s prodigious musical under Russell`s extraordinary visual eye has, as I find out, been an excellent lesson in survival. Man against cameras and effects. Almost a film within a film.
It is not surprising that people report tales of Daltrey`s explosion three days into filming, when he turned round to those nearest and cried in desperation: “This is the first and bloody last film I make”. Russell likes his stars to come hardy.
First there was the saga of the filthy pond water being hosed all over Roger, complete, as it transpires, with the fish that were harmlessly lying on the pond bottom.

Then there was the moment when Daltrey was thrown on set as part of the action and unfortunately missed the mattress that was supposed to break his fall. The result of this was that Daltrey had concussion and was unconcious for seven minutes. At the end of which time our hero came round to feebly enquire: “Did you get that take, Ken?”.
The fact that Roger now boasts absolutely no hair on one arm shouldn`t worry anyone either. Just a little incident, I hear, of walking through banks of flames in a thin T-shirt.
Of course the rest of the set and crew were wrapped up in asbestos suits at the time. And Daltrey did weakly mutter, “I think I`m burning, Ken” before going into what he described as a “yoga like trance and oddly dancing over the broken glass and through the heat not feeling a thing”.
When you hear all that, and think that there`s only three of the fifteen weeks filming to go, perhaps it`s a little easier to understand why the prospect of being locked in with butterflies for a couple of days should hold no worries for Daltrey.
He`s really enjoying the process of filming – the novelty of it, the professionalism, the ability to create the role in yet another way. And he does look shatteringly well, tanned boot polish brown from the filming at “Tommy`s holiday camp”. He`s happy too that Russell is pleased with the way things are going and confident enough to offer him the starring role in his next epic on composer Franz Liszt. Certainly things couldn`t be going better for Roger Daltrey ex-sheet metal worker.

But like everything in life Daltrey`s glee is not 100 per cent infallible. Over lunch it`s apparent that all is not as well as it would appear and rumours that the Who are coming close to their millionth reported break-up is obviously having its usual effect.
For the last two years Daltrey has had this somewhat frantic desire to keep everything going at top rate all at once – of being offered chances he couldn`t turn down, but only doing them when it suited the band he clings on to like a lover. He has always jealously advocated the group`s right to be bigger and better than they`ve ever been. And it has always been Roger that has somehow tried to use the things he`s been offered outside the group to give them a kick into action when things looked like they were getting too quiet.
Today it`s questions about the next film – due to start in January – and maybe the recording of his own second solo album that seems to suddenly bring things to the fore. The fact that the progress of the Who has always been Roger`s biggest worry is not helped by the current rumours that Moon wants to go and live in America, and that Pete can`t decide whether he wants to keep going out on the road. And Daltrey really does need the Who more than maybe anyone realises. To him the band has always been his security, his jumping off board. To make films and solo albums – a rewarding and ego boosting experience though it may be – has really always taken second place to the band and the three guys in it.
The frustration at the situation right now is easy to see in Daltrey`s eyes. The fact that it`s something that has become harder to sort out privately but has to be done in the constant glare of public attention only makes the situation worse.
“Bloody news stories”, he suddenly says pushing away the half eaten steak. “Stupid bloody news stories. As far as the papers are concerned the Who have bloody well been breaking up since the day they formed. And this situation now – well it`s the same one that was going on last year. It`s just that we`re going through a difficult period. It`s not down to breaking up. Everytime the Who are a bit quiet that starts. But it`s not. It`s down to – where do we go from here?”

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And where DO they go from here?
“I think we`ve got to start thinking bigger than we have done. I think we`re going to do a TV special after this film – because once this film comes out believe me it`s going to make us important. I mean it`ll be bloody lunacy for the Who.
“But right now we need to go and record another album. A Who rock and roll album. “Quadrophenia” got blown out of all proportion. No, WE blew it out of all proportion.
“I thought `Quad` had that old Who thing but somehow it didn`t, it got lost again. It`s partly because we tried to do too much ourselves again and because we didn`t have a producer.
“And I think now`s the time we could all do a lot more in films. I mean we`ve got this one which, in Russell`s hands, is going to give us all another new dimension. I mean Moon for instance is fantastic in it. His Uncle Ernie is a bloody classic. No, I haven`t seen any of my own rushes yet, I don`t think I want to”.

Anyway, back to the subject at hand Roger…….
“Yeah, well we`ve wanted to do film things for the past four years and after this thing up and even if I do Liszt I`ll only do it if it says in the contract I can still work two days a week with the band. I mean we`ve GOT to work on the road and make more than one album a year. Otherwise it`s not the bleedin` Who, it`s a joke – like a session band.
“Look it`s not as upsetting as it could be because we`ve been through it all before and come out of it. It just gets me down when we play badly and those four nights we did in New York a couple of weeks ago weren`t good. Oh I mean the kids enjoyed it, but they`d have been happy if we`d got up there and farted. But there was only one night out of the four where we really played well and that`s just because we don`t work enough.
“Either we work or we don`t work. I`m not going on and on like this, because the Who are a bloody good band, they`re not a shit band.But we`ve got to stay on the ball. Gawd,” he sighs. “It`s at times like this that I wish the group wasn`t a name group. I wish we were small again so that we could just get on stage and gig. I think we should get out and play England in any little pissholes we can find”.

Daltrey has a habit of making you feel his frustration. Suddenly and strangely you`re getting as involved as he is, as worried that what he`s saying into a tape machine now is going to come out in cold print like a death knell. Good God y`ll what is happening here……?
But then maybe it`s not so strange. Ten years ago I looned out on Monday nights to The Scene Club to have my hand stamped in fluorescent ink and watch a band called the High Numbers. When, then, rock music was an exciting and unreliable child this band reflected it all. And that they became the Who and kept all that excitement is one of music`s more honourable hours.
Nostalgia may not be what it used to be, but the Who are definitely a band that hold a special place in everyone`s affections.
“Roger!” – the air of doom which suddenly hangs over our heads is whipped away by the entrance of the Who`s press brain, Keith Altham, bearing the trade papers. “It`s all conjecture” he says calmly. “After all how many other bands get involved in sole efforts and don`t split up. You`ve always had this “split” thing hanging over the Who right from the start – everything`ll be alright”.
Nice one Keith. Daltrey looks cheerier and starts leaping about getting ready for the afternoon`s shooting. Activily back to normal. Doug Clark comes breezing in to tell Roger he`s got to go to make up. Big next to Roger`s small brown frame, and with a creasing smile Doug is “Batman” to Daltrey`s “Robin”.

The stories start flowing again. The one about Moon getting so engrossed in his role as Uncle Ernie that where all the other actors used to filming – Oliver Reed, Jack Nicholson – could switch off their parts after a day`s work Moon couldn`t. And so Moon was Uncle Ernie morning, noon and night flashing raincoat and all.
The one about Roger having already started some background work into the life of Franz Liszt, discovering the fellow was pretty damn lary, and so christening him Franz Lust.
They reel out and we reel round some, I fear, just not printable here. But one of the best clean ones comes from Doug…
While they`ve been working in London some miles from the Daltrey manor house they`ve been staying in a penthouse on the 18th floor of a nearby hotel. One night last week, coming off set after ten hours solid slog, they staggered into the hotel in their T-shirts and jeans and went up to wash and change.
As they emerged from the penthouse lift, relates Doug, he was attacked by a frantic hotel employee who had leapt into the next lift and followed them up.
“Look here” he said grabbing Doug`s arm. “Don`t you realise that you building workers aren`t allowed up here on the 18th floor”.
Luckily the lead singer of the Who and the man about to immortalise Franz Liszt on celluloid was busy negotiating the lock on his room door and so was out of earshot.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: The Graeme Edge Band, Robin Trower, Man, Nigel Thomas, Chris Stainton, Chilli Willi, Robert Wyatt, J.J. Cale, Dobie Gray, Nazareth, Sonny Rollins, Druick and Lorange, The SHF Band.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth FROM SOUNDS, July 20, 1974

When it comes to music, the Scottish people really should be proud of having such a great band as Nazareth in their midst. They were one of the most popular bands when I grew up in the 70s, and at school you either liked Nazareth or you liked Abba. There was nothing else for a while, and the imagery of Nazareth`s album covers were difficult not to notice and be impressed by as a young boy. That`s not to say that I wasn`t studying Abba`s album covers as much, looking for Agnetha…. Oh well, here is a good one with Dan McCafferty from the vaults.

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Back in the USA

Proving for the second week running that he has a way with `phones, Ray Telford talks to Dan McCafferty from Florida.

As Billy Walker so succinctly put it after I`d put down the phone on Dan McCafferty who`d called from West Palm Beach, Florida, last week, “Nazareth are nice guys”. Nice guys they are too and so is Bill (he`s managed to keep that way by assiduously avoiding most of the music business assholes and as a result has maintained a reasonably normal head). He also digs Nazareth`s music to some degree which makes his observations on the Naz all the more palatable and genuine – yet another rarity in the music business.
Nazareth are now into the last week of their fourth US tour, a tour which Dan reports has won them a lot of ground with American punters even despite the fact that their last visit there ended up as a complete non event.
The last projected American tour for the band was in January of this year when they were due to support (along with S. Quo) some outfit which was going out under the name of Fleetwood Mac. It was not, of course, the real thing and rather than become part of the great Fleetwood hype Dan and the boys opted out and flew back to their Scottish homes for a few days respite before jetting it to Switzerland to finish off a new album, the recently released “Rampant”.
If Nazareth hadn`t sold so many albums as they have over the past couple of years then the ready excuse would`ve been of course that they were primarily a band to be heard live and that the magic didn`t quite become so apparent when the music was transferred onto magnetic tape, but the fact that they have sold albums in vast quantities both here and on the Continent proves that lots of people hold the band and their hard, brittle rock and roll in pretty high esteem.

As for the States… well Dan reckons it takes a few cracks at the place before you even begin to think you`re getting a foothold and this present tour he guardedly told me had achieved precisely that. The albums released in America so far, discounting “Rampant”, have been doing good business and the interest from press and the radio stations has been more than encouraging.
“All the same,” Dan needlessly informed me, “America is such a bloody big place. You can break big with the radio stations and the people in one State and maybe the neighbouring State too if you`re lucky but then there`s still the other side of the country to come to terms with.
“That`s why so many bands touring here see it as an endless round of gigs with so much hard slog you wouldn`t believe it. At least if you play just one whizz bang tour in Britain you can be sure that everybody is going to pick up on how well you`ve done. It seems like it`s more instant – that`s really the big difference.”
On the present tour Nazareth have been sharing bills with what Dan calls a string of good crowd pullers and are pleased with what they have achieved in terms of audience reaction and general musical progress. In Washington, he says, they met up with Little Feat, who apparently have not fallen apart contrary to all rumours this side of the pond.
It was one of Lowell George`s songs (Little Feat`s slide guitar player), in fact that Naz took it on themselves to record on the “Razamanaz” album and which has since become a main feature of the band`s live sets.
“It really was a great night,” confirmed Dan. “The whole thing was perfect and they certainly didn`t seem to me like a group who were about to bust up. Anybody who plays like they do really have no right to call it a day. They`re that good.”

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On their return from America next week, Dan looks forward once again to being with his wife and son at their home near Dunfermline. He admits never to have had much time for the supposed trappings of a pop star`s life, and winces at the thought of having to leave his family at home while the band are on the road.
“There`s too many tense moments on a tour like this to have your wife and kids around. It wouldn`t be fair on them and it wouldn`t be fair on the band either `cause it is work. There`s no way you can call it a family way of life and luckily all our wives realise and respect that.”
The new Nazareth album, Dan happily reports is well in hand as far as suitable material goes. They had hoped to record some of the songs in America but time wasn`t on their side and so plans had to be shelved.
“We have written a few things, though we haven`t had a proper chance to rehearse them. The only chance we`ve had is to write them roughly on acoustic guitars in hotel rooms and then try them out at sound checks which isn`t really much good but the ideas are there and that`s what`s important. We`re due to come back to the States towards the end of the year and we`ll almost certainly be recording some stuff then.
“I`d like to try that studio in Florida where Clapton did his new album – there are some really nice sounds on that. Meanwhile we`re dying to get home and back to some sanity. We need to see our families again. Too right we do.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: The Graeme Edge Band, Robin Trower, Man, Nigel Thomas, Chris Stainton, Chilli Willi, Robert Wyatt, J.J. Cale, Dobie Gray, Roger Daltrey, Sonny Rollins, Druick and Lorange, The SHF Band.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT John Bundrick FROM SOUNDS, July 13, 1974

You don`t see an article in the mainstream music press with this man too often, so it is with great pleasure that I can re-publish this one. This man have worked with, among others, Free, The Who, Johnny Nash and Bob Marley.
Enjoy yourselves while I`m away. Tonight I will travel from Oslo to London and then further on to Doncaster in the Northern part of England. After a night in a hotel there I will go on to Grimsby and Cleethorpes to watch a great game of football between MK Dons and Grimsby on Saturday. Then on Tuesday it is back to London for a short stay there before going back to Trondheim on Wednesday evening. I will try to post here while I am away. And if you should be anywhere near the locations on my journey – look me up and we`ll have a pint and a talk!

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Broken Arrows and Dark Saloons

John Bundrick (Rabbit to you folks) has been around. He`s worked with some of the hottest names in Texas as well as Johnny Nash, Suzi Quatro and the legendary Free and is currently in Kevin Ayers band. He`s travelled the world and been interviewed by Pete Makowski, not bad for a little ol` Southern boy uh? He`s also had one solo album, “Broken Arrows”, released, has another in the can and is currently working on a third, here PM finds out what makes Rabbit run…

Versatility is the keyword to Rabbit`s success… or downfall. Y`see being one of the cream session guys Rabbit`s versatility makes him compatible with any artist from say Suzi Quatro to Kevin Ayers, yet on album he can be so diverse that he feels maybe people aren`t too keen on his variation.
“I`m trying to get into my own… er bag, so`s that people can recognise me… but then again I want to keep mah versatility.”

ARCHETYPAL

In his mid twenties Rabbit`s an archetypal Texan dude, drawl an` all. His hair is permanently dishevelled, his eyes droop indicating that he`s permanently in need of sleep, his features are similar to Todd Rundgren; the toothy grin and general air of untogetherness.
Yet even at his most disorganised times – Rabbit`s music flows out of him like the brandy in his bottle neat, strong with a touch of finesse about it. Not unlike yer McCartneys and yer Rundgrens, Rabbit`s a musical magician, he seems to manipulate music into whichever form he wishes, like an artist selecting tones and contrasts, he seems to have complete command over what he`s doing.

OVER-INDULGENT

It goes without saying that Rabbit`s first album “Broken Arrows” should have been a commercial smash, although Rabbit can appreciate its lack of success. “That album was me, I had total command over it, so it might have been too over indulgent.”
Still, not to worry. Rabbit trucks on in Island studios, recording overdubbing and mixing tracks that may have originally been laid down a year ago. His whole flat is littered with tapes and cassettes with Free, Jess Roden and countless other artists he`s worked with, his life seems to consist of all night recording session and gigs.

DRINKING

Ask him what he was doing a couple of months ago and he`ll screw his face into a pained concentration and then sigh, “Shit, y`know I can`t remember… I remember getting kicked off a gig for being drunk, but I can`t remember who it was with.”
Rabbit vividly remembers his short stint with Baldry`s band on the Faces tour. “I got that job through the band`s bassist Archie Leggett, who`s an amazing character. The basic problem about the tour was that audiences only wanted to see the Faces.
“We got kicked off that tour for drinking too much, y`know Rod Stewart just came on one night and said that`s it. But bands like that shouldn`t have support acts anyway.”

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FLUIDITY

Next Rabbit lent his able keyboard playing hands to the Kevin Ayers band. “That, again, was through Archie. They were looking for a keyboard player and he suggested me.”
Rabbit refers to Ayers and Co as his “new friends”, he had never heard of Nico, Cale and is not familiar with style of music: “I found it strange, but I knew given time I could get into it. It was different, kinda freaky, so I`ve been trying to make it funky freaky, cause when I play something I like to put feeling into it.
“I really dig Eno, he`s funky. Y`know that track “Baby`s On Fire”, I`d really dig to do a funky version of that, there`s also a Cale number I`d like to do. Eno`s a really weird keyboard player, he marks out the keys on his moog for every number he does and the rest of the sounds he gets by turning all the knobs and controls… which is really amazing.
“Cale and Nico reminded me of people I knew in Texas around `69… but `74 style. Kevin`s (Ayers) attitude to life is amazing, the whole thing was so loose. It wasn`t like Free where on a bad night there`d be arguments and punch ups.
“The thing about Kevin was, that I didn`t know anything about him, before I joined. I was really surprised that he was going down so well, because I had never heard of him before. I tried to add something to the music. Ollie Halsall is good but he`s awful fucking fast… another versatile person.
“The live album`s a bit untogether, but the feel`s there. We were only together for about three days.”
Did they rehearse beforehand. “Oh sure, but that`s a different thing. We rehearsed a helluva lot, but the whole thing was relaxed. Kevin rehearses like Johnny (Nash), gets the basic thing together and lets the rest of it sort itself out.”
Another main source of Rabbit`s concentration is his new album “Dark Saloons” which has been recorded over a period of a year using different musicians, studios and facilities.
The album on first hearing is much stronger and has much more fluidity, continuation. “The album`s been ready for quite a while, but the company are looking for an angle to promote it. I think what I really need is a strong single, and to get that I think it would be better if someone else produced it. Someone who`s commercially minded.
“I`ve approached Micky Most and he`s interested, but I`ve been kinda backing out all the time. If I produced I`d just put down what I wanted but Micky`s a single maker, a hit maker and he`d know what sound to get, which song would be right, I need someone with that kind of confidence to show me the way.”

UNAFFECTED

But what about on the album side, would Rabbit hand over his ticket to a reputed producer?
“Yeh, that`s what I worried about. Y`see if Micky does the single and that goes into the charts then maybe the company might want him to produce… I don`t think so, I`d like to carry on producing because that`s what I dig the most. I know I make a few mistakes, but I won`t be able to expand if I don`t carry on.
“Another thing I`m worried about is if I make it on a single level, I`ll have to somehow capture an album market.”
There`s no doubt that Rabbit is capable of writing a hit single. I mean anyone who`s produced, written and arranged songs for Johnny Nash must have a strong commercial ear.
“The last thing I heard from Johnny he was in Los Angeles and looking for strong single material. Y`see it`s singles again.
“I like the album because it sounds more like a band, tougher. The next album I want to be softer but still with a lot of bite.”
One side of the album features Johnny Nash`s band Sons Of The Jungle, orchestra conducted by Marty Ford and a Swedish band. Side two features the ripping guitar of Snuffy Walden another quality Texan musician.
“I`d really like to have Snuffy in a band or at least on a permanent recording basis. His playing adds that magical quality into my songs.”
And so Rabbit coasts along, playing sessions, recording tracks (he`s even got some songs ready for his third album) pretty unaffected by the surrounding world…
“Ah`m terrible at words”, he would sigh, “I failed English, History even Physical Education… but I passed music”. Nuff said.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Back Door, Kiki Dee, Mike Heron, Marty Wilde, KoKoMo, Fusion Orchestra, The Average White Band, Kevin Coyne, Ron Wood, Bridget St. John, Chip Taylor, Eric Clapton, Gryphon, Tangerine Dream.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Uriah Heep FROM SOUNDS, June 29, 1974

A great review for the band. Well deserved and nice to see!

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Live Review

By John Howe

The Heavy Metal Kids provided the support for Uriah Heep at Hammersmith on Saturday night. They played a very disappointing set for approximately an hour covering most of their forthcoming album. “Rock and Roll Man”, their new single, gained their loudest applause probably because it was the last number. I`ve seen this band before and think they could have done better.
After about thirty minutes Heep took the stage accompanied by clouds of dry ice swirling around their feet. With invisible legs they launched into material from their new album “Wonderful”, including “Suicidal Man”, “So Tired” and their new single “Something Or Nothing.” There was some excellent keyboard work by Ken Hensley on the title track “Wonderworld” plus some nice playing on the grand piano on a number called “The Easy Road.”
Interspersed throughout the concert were old Heep favourites, “Sweet Lorraine,” “July Morning,” “Easy Living,” and “Gypsy” which went down particularly well. They encored with “Look at Yourself” and, as Mr. Byron somberly explained, their last performance of their Rock and Roll Medley with the emphasis on Blue Suede Shoes.
Two Heep members played particularly well, Mick Box and Lee Kerslake. Box, complete master of his guitar played very tightly, letting rip with his screeching high notes supported equally well by Gary Thain on bass who seems to improve with every performance. Lee Kerslake (a very underestimated drummer in my opinion), played very well, pounding out a sweaty beat, nothing dynamic, and just got on with his job. Byron and Hensley performed just as well of course in their respective trades, but then they nearly always do.
All in all it was a typical Heep concert. The joint was rocking and boogieing all night, and the audience enjoyed it, especially an eighty year old grand-dad who was jumping up and down putting most of the young Heep freaks to shame. Good on yer sport.

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The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Rick Wakeman FROM SOUNDS, June 29, 1974

A very strange article. I don`t really know what I shall say about this, but it is kind of different. You judge yourself, but don`t expect any deep musical analysis in this one.

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Is your journey really necessary?

By Bill Henderson

Well, to start with I could tell you what a lousy map drawer Rick Wakeman is. How the bus driver couldn`t follow his map and how we got lost in England`s green and pleasant land. Rick Wakeman`s Magical Mystery Tour or Journey To The Centre Of Nowhere In Particular. So naturally we had to stop at a couple of pubs to ask for directions, which didn`t get us much farther – in fact, back to where we originally got lost from. Or how we asked a policeman who said, “You`re the second coach to ask me that tonight.” And how we finally arrived at the pub.
But while it might have a certain picaresque interest in comparison with, say, “Cobbett`s Rural Rides” or R. L. Stevenson`s “Travels With A Donkey”, it wouldn`t be of much interest to you lot. So instead I`ll tell you how an invitation arrived from A&M Records to go to Rick Wakeman`s local to have a booze-up and a game or two of darts.

CRASS

“Go along,” said Peacock and Mackie in unison, “and come back and write lots of words about it.” “But everyone knows that Rick and Yes aren`t saying anything about anything for a month and I`m not going to be as crass as to ask him about something he doesn`t want to talk about,” I protested. “Well, go and enjoy yourself,” they said, “but still write lots of words.”
So I did.
I can report that Rick is fit and healthy – with a somewhat sunscarlet face. And he seems totally relaxed and happy (which is a good augur for the future): he strode about the crowded pub in an embroidered black velvet jacket (for the benefit of any sartorially-minded readers), smiling and chatting, with his own everpresent, “Rick”-in-scribed beer mug.
But what did he tell you confidentially about his future, about Yes, about the reasons for the split, about the Stock Market slump or the Middle East situation! Nothing. It was neither the time or the place to speak or ask about any of them. Instead Rick told jokes (Not one of which I can remember unfortunately).
He also remarked on our mutual trait at the moment – that of attracting angry, insulting letters from SOUNDS readers. He joked about it obviously, but he does notice, he does pay close attention to such things. He is concerned about what people think.

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And he`s concerned about his community too, apparently helpfully involved in local affairs. Very much a popular local figure – as well as being one of the lads in the pub, knowing everyone and everyone knowing him (although slightly larger than life in that environment with his long blond hair and standing a head above most people there).
He led the cheerleading in the darts matches too. (“Bring out the Branston” (?)). Oh yes, the darts – I almost forgot about that.
As far as my by then slightly inebriated brain can remember, the A&M Records team (into which I found myself pressganged) beat Rick`s local team twice (no thanks whatsoever to me). Then Rick`s Cripples (as it said on the scoreboard) played a hastily-assembled Press team, including myself. The Press, I`m afraid to say, lost miserably. Though no great thanks to Mr. Wakeman, I seem to remember, whose arrowing ability doesn`t quite match his skill on the eightyeights. (Mind you, he`s a lot better than I am – not very difficult).
Time to leave. As I left the pub I noticed a “Journey To The Centre Of The Earth” sticker on the door of the pub, which seemed quite apt juxtaposition. Then a totally uneventful journey back to the metropolis. But a fine evening. Thanks a lot, Rick.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Eric Clapton, Bill Henderson, Moody Blues, Laura Nyro, Carly Simon, Eddie Riff, Leonard Cohen, The Rats, Alex Harvey, Dave Edmunds, Blood, Sweat & Tears, Gordon Lightfoot, David Bowie.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.