Month: April 2019

ARTICLE ABOUT George Harrison FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

A very exciting interview with Mr. Harrison. He clearly evades some questions that are a lot tougher than what I think music journalists are allowed to ask stars of this magnitude these days. This one is really worth reading. Enjoy.

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The dark horse rears his head

After months of rumours and years of wishful thinking, George Harrison has finally hit the road. His massive tour will take in 27 American and Canadian cities for 50 concerts in under two months. It`s the longest tour ever undertaken by a former Beatle since the fragmentation of the band four years ago.
Harrison held an hour-long press conference in the Champagne Room of the Beverly Wilshire Hotel to answer any questions. The room was cram-packed with reporters, television crews and photographers. He spoke about the Beatles, together and otherwise, drugs, the up-coming tour, his newly formed Dark Horse Records, his wife Patti who is living with Eric Clapton, his personal taste in music and much more.
SOUNDS` ANDY McCONNELL was there.

Why, after all these years, have you decided to return to the States?
I`ve been back here many times. This is the first time I`ve been back to work. It`s the first time I`ve had an H-1 visa since `71.
What are the reasons for not having an H-1?
I had the same problem as John Lennon. I was busted for marijuana back in `67 by Sergeant Pilcher.
Did you have a hard time convincing the people to give you a visa?
It takes a long time, you know. A lot depends on Washington and how busy they are and they`ve been pretty busy lately. We applied for it months ago. It`s come through fine, but once the tour`s over I`ve got to get back.
What are your feelings about the up-coming tour?
I think if I had more time I`d be panic-stricken, but I don`t even have time to worry about it.
What kind of material will you be doing on the tour?
Couple of old tunes and a lot of new ones. The old tunes seem to have got slightly different arrangements. I`m gonna do “My Sweet Lord” and “Give Me Love”, but slightly different variations of them. They should be much more loose.
Will Ravi open the show?
No, I`ll be opening the show, but it`s definitely not going to be a Bangladesh Mark II, if that`s what people are thinking.
Will you be playing Britain and Europe?
I`d like to. I tried to squeeze a concert in just before Christmas although all the halls were booked out. The feeling within the band is that we should do a gig in London. They`re saying, `let`s do 12 dates, let`s tour England, let`s tour Europe`. I want to go to Japan. I want to go everywhere. This year there`s too much for me to do and not enough time to do it in.

Is there a paradox between your spiritualism and the atmosphere when you`re touring?
It is difficult, yeah. It`s good practise in a way, to be, as they say, in the world but not of the world. You can go to the Himalayas and miss it completely. Yet you can be stuck in the middle of New York and be very spiritual. I noticed some places like New York bring out a certain thing in myself while I found in places like Switzerland there were a lot of uptight people because they`re living in all this beauty, there`s no urgency in trying to find the beauty in themselves. If you`re stuck in somewhere like New York you have to look within yourself; otherwise you go crackers.
Do you have any anxieties as the tour approaches?
The main one is that I`ve lost my voice, I mean to a degree. It`s getting a bit rough and gravely. There`s a good chance the first few concerts I`m gonna come out playing instrumentals (laughing).
Do you have an album in the can?
Almost. I have a few things to do on it.
Who plays on it?
Some of the basic tracks I did last November. I had (Jim) Keltner, Ringo, Gary Wright, Klaus (Voormann). Some of the tracks I did this year with Willie Weeks, Andy Newark, Tommy Scott; the people in the band on tour with me.
What`s the album entitled?
“Dark Horse”.
Why was there such a gap between this album and “Living In The Material World”?
I`ve been busy working. I was busy being deposed. I`ve been doing some tracks of my own, did the Splinter album, finished up Ravi`s album, been to India for two months, organised the music festival from India; I`ve done a million things.

Why don`t you grant personal interviews?
There`s nothing to say, really. I`m a musician, not a talker. If you get my album it`s like “Peyton Place”, I mean it`ll tell you exactly what I`ve been doing.
When will it be released?
When I`ve finished it.
What are your hopes for your Dark Horse Records? Do you see it becoming very large?
No, no! I don`t want it to turn into a Kinney. I`d like it to be decently small.
What artists do you hope to get on it?
I don`t hope to get any in particular. To tell you the truth, I`ve been here just over a week, and if I signed all the people who gave me tapes, I`d be bigger than RCA and Kinney put together, but fortunately I don`t have time to listen to them all.
Do you pay much attention to what the critics say?
I cancelled all my newspapers five years ago, so I don`t really know what people say. If I do see a review of an album I`ll read it, although it doesn`t make too much difference what they say, because I am what I am whether they like it or not.
Are you ever amazed at how much the Beatles still mean to people today?
Not really. It`s nice. I realise the Beatles did fill a space in the `60s and all the people the Beatles mean anything to have grown up. It`s like anything; if you grow up with something you get attached to it. One of the problems in our lives is that we get attached to things. I can understand that the Beatles did nice things and it`s appreciated that people still like them.
The problem comes when they want to live in the past, when they want to hold on to something. People are afraid of change.

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Have you seen the play?
You mean `John, George, Harry, Ringo, Fred, Bert and Stigwood`? That`s been going on there but I haven`t had a chance to see it yet. I hear conflicting reports. Some people say that it`s lousy and they`re in tears because they say Brian Epstein is lousy, others say it`s fantastic, Brian comes off like an angel. I`ll have to see it when I get a day off.
Are you involved in any serious negotiations to get the Beatles back together for one night?
No, you`ve been reading Rolling Stone.
What did you think of that article?
The point is, it`s all a fantasy, the idea of putting the Beatles back together again. If we ever do that, the reason will be that we are all broke. There`s more chance that we`ll do it because we`re broke than because… and even then, to play with the Beatles… I mean, I`d rather have Willy Weeks on bass than Paul McCartney. That`s the truth, with all respect to Paul. The Beatles was like being in a box, we got to that point. It`s taken me years to be able to play with other musicians. Because we were so isolated it became very difficult playing the same tunes day in, day out.
Since I made “All Things Must Pass”, it`s just so nice for me to be able to play with other musicians, and having played with other musicians, I don`t think the Beatles were that good. I think they`re fine, you know.
Ringo`s got the best back beat I`ve ever heard. He hates drum solos. Paul is a fine bass player, he`s a bit overpowering at times. John`s gone through all his scene but he feels like me, he`s come back around. We`re all at that point. I mean, to tell you the truth, I`d join a band with John Lennon anyday, but I couldn`t join a band with Paul McCartney, but it`s nothing personal. It`s just from a musical point of view.
How did you choose the musicians in your own band?
I didn`t really choose them… so many things in my life I don`t really do; I just feel like an instrument. I knew I was doing a tour and I knew I had to have a band, but I didn`t want to commit myself to anybody, I just let things roll on. I only met Andy Newmark and Willie Weeks a few months ago. If I hadn`t met them, I wouldn`t have a rhythm section, but I believe the Lord provides me or you or all of us, if you believe that, he provides you with whatever you need.

What is your relationship with John and Paul?
It`s very good, actually. I haven`t seen John because he`s been in the States although I`ve spoken to him over the phone. He seems like he`s in great shape. I just met Paul again and everybody`s really friendly, but that doesn`t mean we`re going to form a band.
Let me change the subject… Are you getting a divorce?
No, that`s as silly as marriage.
Did you make any musical rebuttal to “Layla”?
Pardon?! How do you mean, musical… what rebuttal! That sounds nasty. Eric Clapton`s been a close friend for years. I`m very happy about it, I`m still very friendly with him.
Seriously? How can you be happy about it?
Because he`s great. I`d rather she was with him than with some dope.
What`s your attitude on drugs now?
Drugs? Got any? What drugs? Aspirin? What are you talking about? What do you define as drugs? Whisky? I don`t want to advocate them because it`s so hard to get into America.
What do you consider to be the crowning glory so far in your musical career?
As a musician? I don`t think I`ve got any yet. As an individual, just being able to sit here today and be relatively sane. That`s probably the biggest accomplishment to date.
Who are some of the contemporary artists that you admire most?
Smokey Robinson, I`m madly in love with Smokey Robinson. There`s so many of them. I like Dicky Betts. I think Ry Cooder is sensational.
What about Stones?
Yeah, the Stones, you know, they`re fine, you know; nice. I like the Stones. Variety`s the spice of life.
Can you see a time when you`ll give up being a musician?
I can see a time when I`d like to give up this kind of madness, but I`d never stop music. Everything`s based on music.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, Roger Glover, Pink Floyd, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, Bad Company, Phil Spector, Thin Lizzy, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Roger Glover (Deep Purple) FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

I will let Wikipedia say what needs to be said about this one: “The work was originally conceived as a solo vehicle for Jon Lord to be produced by Roger Glover who had recently left Deep Purple. However, Lord proved too busy with Deep Purple, and Glover took up the reins on his own. Using his connections, Glover recruited a large cast of noted rock musicians, with a different vocalist for each character, including David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes.”
Read on!

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Glover has a ball

By Pete Makowski

Roger Glover is a satisfied person nowadays. Since his departure from Deep Purple, Glover has steadily been building up a good reputation as a record producer and now his new venture, “The Butterfly Ball”, will gain him respect as a musician and composer.
“I always felt that people expected certain kinds of things from me,” said Roger, “when I was approached to do this project, I thought `shall I do something really heavy and rocky, or shall I do the complete opposite`. Then I decided to do exactly what I felt was right, not just live up to everyone else`s expectations.”
“The Butterfly Ball And The Grasshoppers Feast” is the title of a book illustrated by Alan Aldridge (well known for “The Beatles Illustrated Lyrics”) around the poetry of William Plomer. Now Glover has taken the idea of the book and transformed it into music.
The music from the album is going to be used in a forthcoming cartoon serial based round the book and there are also possibilities of a film and a play.
The unlikely marriage of Aldridge and Glover resulted via British Lion who first met Roger via Purple when they filmed their “In Concert” performance.
“We used to get lots of offers to do film scores, but I never really considered it before although I did check them out. And when I left the band this came along and it interested me right from the start.
The next move was to write the music. “I didn`t write anything until it got close to the deadline, I find I work better under pressure.
“A lot of the numbers involved experimentation. I had to find out which vocalist would suit a certain number. If it didn`t work with the people at hand then I would hire a session guy.

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“I hope people don`t treat this as the soundtrack album, it`s the `Butterfly Ball` a thing of its own. Songs from the album will be used in the series when it`s made and sold, and I wouldn`t mind doing the incidental music for it because it`s something I haven`t done before.”
The projected cartoon series will be done by Alan Aldridge and Lee Mishkin. The pilot of the film is definitely in the Disney class. The film has that kind of appeal which will attract both the juvenile and adult market. Terry Flounders has the job of making “The Butterfly Ball” a household name – as he did with the Wombles. It`s a winner, although Roger can see some pitfalls.
“I can see a couple of things that would hold it back. Primarily my name. Y`see the album can`t exactly be described as a family album but then again it`s not anything in the mould of Purple. When people hear it they immediately put it under certain categories, which is something I can`t stand. This album should stand out on its own as much as within the context of the film… it`ll be interesting to see what the critics say.
“I`m really glad to be off the road,” said Glover, “although I`ve got to admit I did think about getting a band together. I sometimes miss gigging which is different to the high pressure touring schedules with Deep Purple.”
Glover puts his career with Purple well into the past, although he doesn`t knock it, he feels it has contributed to his cynical outlook towards the music business. “There are so many false people you can meet in a business like this it`s untrue.”
Glover`s production ventures have brought him much success and satisfaction. “It was when I started producing I realised I wanted to write again, cause when I produced a band I`d find myself writing parts and changing parts for them which I don`t feel is the right thing for a producer to do.
“I`ve been living in Kingsway (Ian Gillan`s studio) for the most of this year and I`ll be taking a rest for a while… I think I deserve it.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, George Harrison, Pink Floyd, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, Bad Company, Phil Spector, Thin Lizzy, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Pink Floyd FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

A really nice preview of the show that Pink Floyd were about to unveil on the world. What a lucky man Mr. Peacock was, to be able to see this in its early stages from the front row. Read on!

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The moon in… November

As the Pink Floyd set off on their British tour, Steve Peacock sneaks behind the scenes for a preview and predicts yet another triumph.

Have you ever wondered what Pink Floyd would sound like when they`re just jamming around – warming up while technicians fiddle with the PA system?
It`s somewhere between Booker T and the MGs and the Who – at least that`s the way they sounded in the early part of Friday afternoon at Elstree. The start of their British tour was just more than three days away, and in one of the big hangar-like buildings at the studios, it was last-chance day for the Floyd and their tour crew.
Quite honestly, it amazes me how a band like the Floyd ever gets on the road: Arthur Max – the `big chief` of the road crew – must have nerves of steel and a quad brain to co-ordinate the sound, the lights, the films, the people… and inevitably, Friday brought its share of teething problems. Equally inevitably, It Will Be All Right On The Night.
The Floyd have long had an enviable reputation for sound quality on tour, and this time – as Nick Mason explained – they have new refinements to the PA which they hope will advance that reputation one stage on. From Friday`s evidence, I`d say that will be the case.
In other ways too, this tour looks like pushing forward the Pink Floyd`s reputation – as a band. The first half of the programme will be entirely new stuff – 45 minutes or so, which divides roughly into three pieces: “Shine On You Crazy Diamond”, “Raving and Drooling”, and “Gotta Be Crazy”. Roger Waters` new lyrics for these songs are among the best he`s written – still with the barbed directness of his “Dark Side Of The Moon” words, but with subtler, and consequently greater, effect.

“Gotta Be Crazy” is perhaps the strongest, lyrically – a kind of catechism of traps and pitfalls – and the music fits it perfectly: it alternates between angry, fast, chopping sections with Dave Gilmour playing fast, savage chord parts and slow, almost sombre sections led by Roger`s bass parts. Dave Gilmour and Rick Wright have excellent solo breaks, and towards the end there`s a section where they make the best use they ever have of the group`s voice power, with Roger singing the lead lines and Dave and Rick echoing.
The second half is “Dark Side Of The Moon”, with the new tricks and jerks. Earlier this year the Floyd tried “Dark Side” with film during a French tour and decided the idea was sound: during the Summer they worked out new pieces of film and they`ll use these for the first time on the British tour.
The screen is like a giant bass-drum skin which stands centre-stage behind the band, with the film back-projected. As the heart beat starts, a moon appears on the screen, growing bigger and bigger until it fills the whole area and disappears, to be followed by a moving development of the sound wave pattern that runs across the centre-fold of the album cover.

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DAZZLING

The second, and most outstanding film sequence, comes during “On The Run” and leads into “Time”. It starts with lights – street lights, car lights, flashing lights on top of police cars, airport and aircraft lights… a bewildering, dazzling succession. You then move through a kind of cloud tunnel towards a planet and just as the camera gets close to the surface the film switches to animation, skimming over the planet surface, over cities, between high buildings: it`s inter-cut with various scenes of urban destruction.
To introduce “Time” there`s a fantastic clock sequence which ends up with an avenue of swining pendula. Tick, tick, tick, tick… “Ticking away the moments…”

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Written down it looks somewhat literal and corny but the film and the music combined is anything but corny. “Great Gig In The Sky” is accompanied by some of the underwater shots from the “Crystal Voyager” movie which uses “Echoes” in its soundtrack. Venetta Field and Carlena Williams sing the “Great Gig” part, and Dick Parry again plays sax.
“Money” has an appropriate film section, with some neat contrasts between actual notes and coins and the people who use them – or can`t get enough. And later there`s another excellent piece of staging. As they come to the end of “Brain Damage”, Roger sings “There`s someone in my head and it`s not me”, which cues in film of various politicians. The effect is frightening.
That`s the show – the new stuff, and the new “Dark Side”, which is obviously much changed as a production, but also quite heavily amended as a piece of music. The girls are used more, and more effectively, and… well, new tricks and jerks. There will be no oldies.
Oh – a word about the programme. Doubtless you will be assailed outside the hall by people trying to flog you two-colour reproductions of old Press cuttings and all the other garbage that gets touted as “special Pink Floyd souvenirs”. You are of course welcome to consume as much as you wish, but I suspect you`ll find it worth waiting for the official programme, on sale inside the hall: it`s in the form of a comic, with our heroes in various strip exploits, plus a remarkable cartoon by Gerald Scarfe, lifelines, a quiz, and the words to the three new songs.
Accept no substitute.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, George Harrison, Roger Glover, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, Bad Company, Phil Spector, Thin Lizzy, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT “The cost of rock” FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

At the time of posting this it is Easter. A very special time for a lot of Christians and a very happy time for those of us who may be sinners and don`t believe, as we have some time off work for a few days. To celebrate I give you a very special article where we learn a bit about the economy behind touring in the early 70s. I have tried to make it as informative as possible by having the equivalent price in todays money value (2018) in brackets beside the prices given. I hope you find it interesting.

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Where will it all end?

In this, Geoff Barton looks closely at the financial side of putting a band on the road.

Now that a crisp new copy of SOUNDS costs you 10p(£1,15), Mars bars set you back 6p and the price of petrol has risen to God knows how much per measly gallon, it`s hardly surprising to see ticket prices spiralling steadily upwards along with everything else.
These days 50p(£5,75) makes for a cheap gig, and if you`re lucky enough to get two good bands for that price, then it`s something of a bargain. I suppose it`s fair to quote £2(£23) as an average price to pay to see a reasonably big band – although many think that the advent of the £5(£57,50) ticket is not that far away.
Be that as it may, people were recently willing to pay £3.50(£34,50) for a super-cramped Wembley supergig – not even the most fervent CSN&Y fan could call that value for money. Or maybe he could – after all, the eternal inflationary black market ticket racket thrives on the poor fans who will pay just about any price to see their heroes, whoever they may be.
But don`t think I`m putting the 70,000-odd Wembley concert goers down. I remember I was equally willing to queue for seven hours, for the most part squashed up against a brick wall, to pay £4.40(£46) for two plots of carpet to see a rather duff Who gig at London`s Lyceum. Dreadful.
I guess we all reckon that we`ve been ripped off at one time or another and, theoretically, it should never happen. But, of course, it does – and all too frequently.
If you`ve ever felt particularly hard done by, your natural recourse is to blame the band in question. But touring is a complex venture all the way down the line, and a hell of a lot more people other than the bands are involved.
You`ve got promoters, roadies, stage managers, social secretaries or whatever. They`ve all got to come out on top, with their heads above water. Yeah… a complex venture. You pay the price, you see the band, but just where does all your money go?

If anything goes wrong during the process of setting up a gig, the promoter will feel the brunt of it first and foremost. He has to pay the rental costs for a hall, which naturally varies from place to place; he has to finance the printing of posters and maybe advertise in the papers; he has to pay any staff he employs, and so on and so on. Getting a concert together is a risky business and about a third of the price on your creased up ticket goes to the promoter. Hopefully he makes a profit somewhere.
Then there`s eight per cent VAT on the ticket, and some box office commission probably has to come out of it as well. The rest goes to the band.
Simple enough? Oh no, it doesn`t stop there.
Take Gallagher And Lyle, for example. They`ve just completed a nationwide tour with support act, comedian and 14 piece orchestra – a four hour show in all, which they financed themselves to the tune of a cool £15,000 (£172,500). “The costs were collossal” said an undaunted Berry Gallagher. “Out of an initial outlay of of £15,000 we got about £3,000 (£34,500) back. We`re quite pleased.”
Gallagher And Lyle insisted on a maximum price of £1 (£11.50) for all the dates. That`s a good gesture, but on the face of it they lost a lot of money. Why did you do it, Benny?
“It was just to promote our album. Sure, we lost a lot, but it was worthwhile because our album sales doubled.”
The cheapo-cheapo G&L roadshow was probably an exception to the traditional touring rule, if there is such a thing. The band`s fee varies from £750 (£8625) to £1,000 (£11,500) so they obviously couldn`t hope to break even, let alone show a profit. Just look at these figures: there were 29 people on the road, and hotel bills came to £3,500 (£40,250); wages for the orchestra alone came to £5,000 (£57,500); and the costs of hiring a three ton lorry and a 41 seater coach amounted to £1,500 (£17,250). It makes your £1 ticket stub seem rather insignificant, doesn`t it?

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Benny: “The main thing is to give everyone a good quality concert. If it`s cheap too, all well and good. But I don`t see the value behind groups charging outrageous prices. It`s crazy. Naturally, the band must be very good to be able to charge a large sum – but I wouldn`t pay their price. They can`t be that good.”
Gallagher And Lyle plan to tour again in late December or the New Year, this time charging about £1.50 (£17,25) a gig. Benny: “It`s about time we made some money.”
So that`s where your money goes. Well, some of it at least. The Gallagher And Lyle tour was, admittedly, an extreme and hardly characteristic case. But at least it gives you some idea as to the vast amount of money wrapped up in a band on the road.
10cc currently have a more conventional stage show, and their manager Rick Dixon was at first a bit dubious about participating in a sort of band breakdown, for tax reasons. But eventually 10cc`s financial secrets were revealed.
10cc have been on the road for about a year now, and Rick thinks that when it comes round to assessing the band`s situation, money-wise, they`re going to be very much in the red. Still, during that year 10cc have risen in stature and popularity and can now command an, on the surface, substantial fee of £1,000 per gig. The band have six people in their road crew – a sound engineer, three equipment guys and two to deal with the lighting. They run three vehicles – two for equipment and lighting which they hire and one, a Mercedes limo, which they own themselves and travel in.

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“We used to own a Mercedes van,” says Rick, “but as the band got bigger and the PA got bigger it became inadequate for our needs. We didn`t buy a new one but decided to start hiring. It worked out for us as a very good deal. Hiring is a better proposition. If we owned trucks they`d be written off within three years anyway. The hire company is responsible for their vehicle – if the engine falls out it`s their lookout, not ours.”
At the moment 10cc charge around £1,25 (£14.38) per ticket per gig, and through Rick`s own admittance they`re businessmen in part: “If we know we`re going to fill a place, we go for a higher price.”
Out of the band`s average fee of £1,000, £750 has been spent even before they get out on to the stage: “the £1,000 has to cover road crew wages; hotel bills; petrol for three vehicles; the purchase price of one vehicle; the depreciation of vehicles, equipment, etcetera; publicity; miscellaneous expenses…” The list is almost endless. Oh yeah – the band have to earn a living out of all that as well.
Rick: “I`m sure there are easier ways to live. If we weren`t slightly crazy and very dedicated we`d never be doing this at all. People think we lead an easy life, but I tell you it`s not much fun leaving home at 9 a.m. and getting back at 4 a.m. the next day.”
So, when you buy your ticket you`re not just paying to see a band, but you`re directly paying for many other things besides. The next time you pay to see a gig and complain about the price of the ticket, just think about it for a while. Is the price you`re paying all that much out of the way?
Rick: “It`s been the same for a long, long time – no-one has it as good as British concert-goers. In Holland you pay maybe £15 (£172.50) to see Shirley Bassey, and when 10cc played Copenhagen the tickets were £5 (£57.50) each.”
And will we eventually be paying these prices? “It`s a question of politics, a higher standard of living, world prices, what have you. If Britain is to attain a standard of living comparable to that of the rest of the EEC we must pay the price.
“Pop music is a business, like anything else. Petrol costs more, vehicles cost more, insurance costs more, electricity costs more, everything costs more. Someone somewhere has to pay for it all and, as always, it`s usually the consumer.”
A depressing picture, to be sure. Meanwhile, Bowie talks about charging £8 (£92) per seat for a British “theatour”, and I dare say we`ll willingly pay that much if he comes over. But it`s got to end somewhere. It can`t go on forever. Can it?

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pink Floyd, Pete Brown, George Harrison, Roger Glover, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, Bad Company, Phil Spector, Thin Lizzy, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Elton John FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

A very entertaining article with Elton John written by Mike Flood Page. Mr. Page was the News Editor for Sounds from 1974 – 1975. His awards include three BAFTAs for interactive work and three from the Royal Television Society  including best TV documentary series. His work nowadays is with something called OurBeeb that runs a site called openDemocracy – for those of you that would like to investigate further, you can go here: https://www.opendemocracy.net/en/ourbeeb/

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Captain Fantastic

Elton John is well into his current American tour and has been to see the big fight between Ali and Foreman… still quite hoarse he managed to talk to Mike Flood Page.

“You didn`t go to the fight last night did you? We went in Chicago; the atmosphere in the place was incredible. Not one person was shouting for Foreman, the audience was 90 % black and it was all: `Ali! Ali!` I was quite hoarse by the time I came out.”
It is 11 a.m. in Chicago, 5 p.m. in London and instead of telling me the latest Elton John news, all our boy from Pinner can talk about is the big match. With the transatlantic phone rates what they are it`s an expensive time to wax enthusiastic about boxing. Eventually, Captain Fantastic as he appears on the new album, recorded in July, is dragged back to the subject of the current US tour.
E.J. and entourage are around a third of the way through the tour, and have holed up in Chicago for a week using it as a base from which they will fly to gigs. This is the first US tour the band have done where they have sold out every date in advance, often in record time and Elton is understandably happy about it: “We`re playing really well, it`s just tightened everybody up. We have a special stage and I`m really pleased.”

RESPONSES

There was a little aggro at one date they were due to play in New Haven Connecticut, firstly there were forged tickets on sale in large numbers and then there was a riot in which the police for once were worsted, as a result New Haven is off and a day has been added in Boston otherwise things are going fine, and Kiki Dee who is opening the show, is also drawing rave responses despite a little nervousness at first.
The new album, “Captain Fantastic And The Brown Dirt Cowboy” was recorded at Caribou before the tour began, but is not due for release until next May to allow a year from the release of Caribou, rather than flood the market with Elton John, as happened back in the days of “Madman Across The Water”. The material for the album was written on the crossing to the US on the S.S. France and Elton describes it as: “Just experiences of Bernie and I, how we got together through the advertisement, and all our experience up to the `Empty Sky` album.”
Did this presage the start of a series of albums, along these lines, I enquired? A sort of instant “History Of Elton John” a mythology in the making? “No! God forbid! We just set it around the idea of our disappointments and things. It`s really not a concept album. There`s a few personal songs in there as well. It`s the first time we`ve written an album where Bernie has had the running order for the songs before I wrote the melodies. That was very strange; but it`s worked out well.”
What did he feel about the new album compared with the last one, also recorded at Caribou, in the light of the highly critical comments producer Gus Dudgeon had made about “Caribou” a couple of weeks earlier?
“Well `Caribou` was made in like ten days, whereas this time we really cooled it and had three or four months off, cancelled the English and European tours because we were exhausted. And when we went over to Caribou this time we booked five weeks studio time which we`ve never had the luxury of doing before. Also with `Caribou` there were a few personality problems; everyone was shouting at each other because we were tired. I still like the album, I prefer it to `Don`t Shoot Me`, but there you go.”

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This time there were not the additional musicians that there were for the previous album, although Elton himself plays mellotron and Arp and Ray Cooper is featured more heavily than before. He feels that if anything is added now it will be some Moog synthesiser by David Henshaw, so it seems as if Gus Dudgeon`s hope of a Tom Bell arrangement has fallen through.
There was also the appearance, up at the Caribou ranch, high in the mountains outside Denver of John Lennon, who guests on the new E.J. single, “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds” due out in mid-November. How had that come about? “I met John last year; and then when I was in New York after getting off S.S. France, I saw him again and he said, `come down to my sessions.` So I did, and ended up doing, `Whatever Gets You Through The Night`, and `Surprise` from the album. And he was going to LA to do a song which he had written for Ringo, and I said:
`On the way back, why don`t you come up to Caribou? `Cos we`re gonna do, `Lucy In The Sky` and he said, `sure`.
And so John Lennon appears on the new Elton John single, while Elton sings with John on his, which looks set for an American number one at this moment. “He had a good time, except he couldn`t get used to the altitude; he had to keep rushing to the oxygen tank. I got on really well with him, `cos he works the same way I do in the studio. We really just had a laugh. I`ve really got a very strong affection for him.”
John Lennon is by no means the only person with whom old Hercules has been collaborating for recording purposes lately. Apart from the well publicised appearance on Rod Stewart`s album, Elton sings with Neil Sedaka on the latter`s new single in the US (where Sedaka is signed to Rocket Records); and plays piano on one of the tracks on Ringo`s next elpee. All a bit of a turnaround for the man who even a year ago, had hardly played with anyone outside his own sessions, since the days when he was a humble pianist doing those sessions which produced the Woolies soundalike records with the likes of David Byron now of U. Heep.

“Well, just now I seem to be the world`s top paid session singer, but no-one ever asked me before! Usually they think: we won`t have him on it, boring old fart! I only appear on people`s records that I know. I`m just beginning to enjoy myself and loosen up a bit.”
The conversation then gracefully wound its way to the subject of the Christmas Show, for the first time this year, Elton`s Christmas party will go out live on TV on Christmas Eve. A spectacular first for Elton and something no other rock artist has achieved. What plans did he have for the show?
“No idea at the moment! We did a gig at the Festival Hall in May when we did a sort of history of Elton John. We played `Empty Sky` and something off every album. We started with a three-piece and added Davey and then Ray, and it went down really well. So I`ve got that sort of concept in mind. I`m not going to do any new songs at all; `cos when the new album comes out we just want to do a special gig where we play the whole of the new album. So at Christmas we`ll be playing numbers from, `Madman` that we don`t play anymore, like `Holiday Inn` and `Levon`.
“I should like to bring the stage over from the States and we`ve got the most incredible new lighting system which it would be nice to use at Hammersmith. It`ll be something special anyway.”
Elton also expressed a keen desire to use a brass section, as he is on the US tour where he is backed up by the Muscle Shoals horns, who are unfortunately not likely to be available come Christmas. He also hopes to encourage Nigel Olsson to come out from behind his drum kit to perform his single, a remake of the Bee Gees classic, “Only One Woman”, which they recorded while up at Caribou working on Elton`s album. Elton`s US tour finishes on December 3 and he will be back the next day “Cos I have to catch the Crystal Palace home game”, and in time to finalise things for the Christmas concerts; and he hopes some dates in the New Year, which are in the planning stages right now.
Ever the discophile, Elton began to go on about the new records he had picked up in the States, such as a song by one Gloria Gaynor which had made number one in the New York soul charts and was nowhere yet in the national stakes. He also anxiously enquired how the Lennon record was performing over here. His last question was direct:
“Is there anybody moving out of England yet?” I passed on what little I knew of those lucky enough to need tax havens. “Well tell everybody that I ain`t moving out. I can`t leave my football team”. And with that he rang off.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pink Floyd, Pete Brown, George Harrison, Roger Glover, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, Bad Company, Phil Spector, Thin Lizzy, Janis Ian.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.