Month: May 2019

ARTICLE ABOUT John Entwistle (The Who) FROM SOUNDS, March 1, 1975

I really liked this interview with Mr. Entwistle. Some interesting facts are revealed too. Credit to Mrs. Charone for having this great talk.
Read on!

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Here`s to the next punch up

Everyone knows how difficult it was to get the Mona Lisa to smile – not to mention John Entwistle. Imagine Barbara Charone`s surprise when he cracked his stone face image.

The following words on John Entwistle will not mention the usual array of adjectives heaped on the infamous Who bassist. Nowhere on this page will you find any black print that reads morose, evil, creepy or other descriptions of that ilk. Just for a refreshing change we will expose the brighter side of John Entwistle.
For starters here`s some captivating trivia bound to fascinate even the most casual Who fan. At last we can now reveal that for a long time John`s lucky numbers were 127 and 8. So troublesome is this plaguing dilemma that for more than a few years all relevant hotel room numbers and telephone exchanges revolved around those very digits. Fascinating stuff this.

BEAUTIFUL

In addition to the usual assortment of beautiful guitars, and the unusual acquisition of a suit of armour that lurks mysteriously in his front room, John Entwistle owns four automobiles none of which he is able to drive. One of the cars in question of which he has never been caught even sitting in the driver`s seat, adorns a poster enclosed in his brand new album `Mad Dog.` The dog in question also belongs to John. Sneaky way of wending our way towards Ox isn`t it?
“What keeps the Who going,” John casually remarked propped up against the bar of a Wardour Street pub, “is the freedom for everyone in the group to do individual projects. This way if the Who ever broke up, we all have our own identity. Ox makes my position in the Who that much stronger.”
Balancing precariously on that very special working relationship the four men achieve, one wonders if Entwistle`s recent show of strength will offset that integral balance?

EVASIVE

“I would never want to disturb the balance of power in the Who,” John says being purposely evasive. “But Ox was the only move I could make. In the beginning Ox might have been a plaything but not now. I always talked about going on tour with the band but nothing ever happened. Now that I`m actually on the road, I realise it`s a feasible thing, not just a side interest. Ox is a definite thing that I want to do. And I want it to carry on as long as the band stays together,” – he laughs nervously, “throughout the rest of the Who`s career. It`s my means of playing my material onstage.”
“I`ll be less frustrated and more confident going back to the Who,” John matter of factly remarked sipping slowly on a brandy and American Dry. “Before Ox I couldn`t come to the front of the stage because I got so used to leaning back against my amplifiers and looking bored. I`ll still look bored,” he says snidely, “standing in front of the stage but I can`t change that. The only time I don`t look bored is when my mouth is moving.”
Wonderful sense of humour has our John, as he sits against the bar, mouth moving, boredom disappearing as he continues assessments and predictions of the past and future.
“I know I`m supposed to be the quiet one,” he says with a moving mouth, “but I think when I go back to playing with the Who again I won`t be standing back in the shadows. I`m quite used to standing out front now. Ox hasn`t changed my style of playing but it`s altered me a lot onstage. Doing announcements is completely new to me. I doubt if anyone knows what my natural voice sounds like. Some people in England do now but in the States they`ve never really seen me talk,” he laughs at the absurdity of it all.
“I am enjoying being the frontman but it`s hard work. The hard work isn`t onstage but off; doing interviews, radio tours. I`ve got a new record company, Decca, so I thought I might as well put on a happy, smiling face for the first album cause they won`t get that much cooperation from me for the second.”
What with the Who being, well rather popular, John must have been a bit apprehensive about going out on the road without his comrades of ten years, slightly worried that the audience would bombard the stage with verbal assaults like “where`s yer mates?”
“Sure most of the people that come to see me come expecting me to do some Who stuff but nicely enough no one has shouted out we want the Who. Only one person yelled out `Magic Bus` and I told him to get stuffed. Usually the requests have been from `Whistle Rymes` or songs like `Boris The Spider` and `Heaven And Hell.`

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“What I really mean to do more onstage with Ox is play bass solos. At the moment I`m trying to take over from guitar and keyboard solos on bass. I did do one but you probably didn`t notice because I push a button and the volume of my guitar suddenly doubles. No one notices cause the same thing has happened to Pete for years. People always wonder how he manages to play a lead phrase with his hands on a chord swinging his arms around and notes coming out but he`s using the same sort of guitar sound.”
Anyone with ears in good working condition must have noticed through the last couple years that Entwistle`s bass mastery has mysteriously improved. On `Quadrophenia` the prominent bass parts provided more than a solid underneath.
“I changed back to playing without a plectrum. `Tommy` was done with a plectrum but when `Who`s Next` came along I changed back to fingers. By the time we got to `Quadrophenia` I was used to recording with my fingers which makes me able to play much faster.
“`Quadrophenia` was really an instrumental album and you needed to hear the bass up, which seemed to hold the numbers together. I`ve always thought the bass had been light on all our albums up to `Quadrophenia`. Before that the only one I liked the bass sound on was `Live At Leeds`.”
Right now Ox are in America. When they return the band should be well oiled, running smoothly and ripe for perhaps a charity London gig, a possible benefit for the Battersea Dogs Home. Well something like that. While he`s away Decca have released the `Mad Dog` album, a curious assortment of past rock styles done up with a combination of serious and not-so-serious intentions. But the next Ox album should feature the band as it is in concert.
“That new album really started out as a `Rigor Mortis` album and then Ox was formed. We didn`t really know what directions we were going in till we played onstage. Now that we know it`s not going to be in that rock and roll vein. Obviously we`ll play some rock numbers, even the Who do that, but it will really be down to what we get together in the free form parts, improvising.

SPECTORISH

“It`s a nice change playing with a keyboard player. In the end it wasn`t worth having the bigger band. We`ve had two lady singers when we did that `Old Grey Whistle Test` because the single has female voices on it. Yeah I suppose the `Mad Dog` track was my sorta Spectorish number. I`ve always liked overdubbing lots of instruments. Unfortunately Spector discovered it first so everything after gets named after him.”
Aside from discovering multi-instrumentation and grandiose production after Spector, life for John Entwistle is good and productive. Unlike other musicians who sit back in their easy chair watching the caretaker keep the mansion tidy, Entwistle has been extremely busy taking part in the `Tommy` soundtrack album, mixing `Odds And Sods,` playing on `Fearless Flash` a rock musical of sorts, and producing the Sharks album that never was.
“I`ve spent the last year in the studio,” he says half seriously, “I have to be busy cause I can`t stand having free time. When the Who weren`t working I could have gone to the Bahamas for a month but I go out of my way to feel ill. When I`m healthy,” he says sardonically, “I feel ill.
“What I learned from producing that Sharks album is that I`m not built to be a producer. I started getting jealous, I wanted to play not suggest!”

OPPORTUNITY

But he will get the opportunity to play soon enough when the Who forge bravely into areas unknown this Spring to record their next vinyl effort.
“I`m really looking forward to doing the next Who album because it will be a straight album,” he says mustering up mild enthusiasm but secretly excited. “This next one won`t be such hard work cause `Quadrophenia` was difficult work. Some of those numbers had impact but others felt like padding. I like to hear the material rehearsed before we record which is what happened with the last album. The market will certainly be swamped with Who product soon,” he smiles slightly. “What with solo albums from Roger and Pete, the new Who album and the `Tommy` soundtrack.
“I don`t see the Who breaking up in the next six years, I hope,” he adds softly. “Nobody wants to break the Who up, not unless things started slipping downwards and we started to lose interest. But,” he predicted ordering another brandy and American, “that wouldn`t happen for at least three years.”
If time away from each other has given Who members individual self confidence, they should be able to reunite with renewed inspiration and enthusiasm. There will always be arguments, fights and squabbles as long as there is the Who and as even the most casual Who afficiando must know by now, the band do occasionally lose their collective tempers.
“The only time I got really angry was when we did a ten week American tour and came out of it with only £100 each,” John says in a burst of nostalgic recollections. “When I found that out I cut a mattress in half with a bowie knife. Every band has the same pressures but they don`t all come out of it.
“The thing about the Who,” John astutely concluded finishing up the last of the brandy, “is even when we did have punch-ups, we`d make up and get on even better.”
Here`s to the next punch-up.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Joe Cocker, Argent, Paul McCartney, The Troggs, Chaka Khan, Lindisfarne, Rupert Holmes, Black Oak Arkansas, Labelle, Return To Forever, Arthur Lee, Flying Burrito Brothers, Glitter Band, Andy Fraser, The Sound of Philly, Back Door, Ronnie Lane, ELO, Tom Paxton.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Alice Cooper FROM SOUNDS, March 1, 1975

Well, I will give it you straight: This is one of my favourite albums ever. I have played it so much that I`ve had a break from it for some years now. I almost overdosed on the sounds from this album. There is much to like here, but I would recommend playing “Steven” loud in a darkened rooom. What joy to listen to this – I think I need to play it again just because I`m writing this…
Read on!

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Necrophiliac nightmare boogie

Alice Cooper: `Welcome To My Nightmare` (Anchor 2011).

Record review by Pete Makowski

This is Alice`s soundtrack album… when you come to think of it, weren`t all his others? Mr Cooper has finally left the golf course to make a very welcome comeback to horrorock and rollsville. It`s strange, I wasn`t particularly enamoured by Cooper`s efforts on `Muscle Of Love` while a lot of people who were previously adverse to him went bananas over the album. Now with the arrival of this disc the same clan yell abuse when it touches the turntable. I think this is definitely Alice`s best offering yet. If you`ve never heard him before this is undoubtedly the one to get, it encapsulates all his previous ideas into one neat package – in fact Alice features a lot of his previous themes. This may be due to lack of ideas, but still the whole thing makes Alice sound fuller, more potent than ever before. A lot of credit must be given to the band backing him. Who could ask for a stronger line up than Steve Hunter and Dick Wagner (guitars), Johnny (Bee) Badanjek (drums), Jozef Chirowski (keyboards), Bob Ezrin (keyboards), Whitey Glan (drums), Tony Levin (bass)? A gathering of the finest session men who manage to inject a limitless amount of feel and excitement into Coopers work. Credit go to an assortment of writers, including Wagner, Ezrin (who also produced the album), Kim Fowley, and, of course, dear old Vinnie Furnier who spits and snarls those vocals with that lovable venomous fury as he takes you through his nightmare. The atmosphere is enhanced by a particularly powerful, maybe a bit corny, narrative from Vincent Price who is featured as the curator in `The Black Widow`.

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`Devil`s Food` has that same sinister phasing that can be found on `I Love The Dead`, although the necrophiliac boogie is reserved for `Cold Ethyl` on side two which features some searing guitar work from Steve Hunter. `Department Of Youth` is a tailor-made `Schools Out` type single that has a demented chorus line sung by Dave Ezrin and The Summerhill Children`s Choir. `Years Ago`, `Steven` and `The Awakening` is a trilogy (I think) about Steven going through phases of madness which still leaves you unsure whether he`s insane or not.
The final track `Escape` is almost Alice`s anthem and features those familiar screams of `I wanna get out of  here` that can also be heard on the `Love It To Death` album. The playing and arrangements are solid and consistent throughout, the only place this album falls short is in the lyrics which are a little corny at times. Apart from that, this platter confirms the return of the mascara-covered shock rocker. Now that I`ve heard the album I can`t wait to see the film!

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Joe Cocker, Argent, Paul McCartney, The Troggs, Chaka Khan, Lindisfarne, Rupert Holmes, Black Oak Arkansas, Labelle, Return To Forever, Arthur Lee, Flying Burrito Brothers, Glitter Band, Andy Fraser, John Entwistle, The Sound of Philly, Back Door, Ronnie Lane, ELO, Tom Paxton.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Singles reviewed by John Peel FROM SOUNDS, February 1, 1975

There were some very interesting singles reviewed in this edition of Sounds. So I collect those I found most interesting here, the one after the other for your enjoyment. John Peel was an English disc jockey, radio presenter, record producer and journalist. He was the longest serving of the original BBC Radio 1 DJs, broadcasting regularly from 1967 until his death in 2004. And while I don`t agree with all of his assessments of these artists reviewed here he should have credit for being one of the first broadcasters to play psychedelic rock and progressive rock records on British radio.
Read on!

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Singles reviewed by John Peel

Star Time

***** An essential buy
**** Well worth having if you`ve got the money
*** Good, try to hear it
** Ho-hum
* Very ho-hum
No stars Pass by on the other side

Kiss: `Nothin` To Lose` (Casablanca). **

I played this on one of my inaudible radio programmes recently – and, hearing it again, I`m not entirely sure why. You must remember the furore last year – or was it the year before – when David Bowie`s arrival in New York stimulated a vast number of extreme groups with names like Wandering Hand & The Pontius Pilates, who wore lots of make-up and off-the-shoulder evening gowns and were liable, at the swish of a flimsy undergarment, to perform athletic sexual feats, with Latin names, on stage. Kiss may or may not come from New York – I neither know nor care – but they are one of the very few of the perv rock bands who managed to cunnilinger long enough to actually record. `Nothin` To Lose` is crypto-high-energy music, the musical equivalent of sleeping with one of those extravagantly proportioned inflatable women – with comprehensively detailed polythene genitalia – which seem to be called either Greta or Ingrid. `Cunnilinger long enough` is rather good, I think.

 
ZZ Top: `La Grange` (London). ***

The Texas-based blues-rockers (I`m trying for a job with Rolling Stone – hope you like that intro.) are big faves with the rank-and-file in the ZOUNDS office. If London had scrapped the moderately embarrassing John Lee Hokum spoken stuff that starts this it`d have scored another star. Good and tight and unadorned blues-based music otherwise. Buchanan-influenced guitar, tough rhythm. A good row, mainly instrumental.

 
Santana: `Mirage` (CBS). ***

From `BORBELETTA` and unaccountably pronounced “moo-rardge” throughout. Despite nondescript vocals worth hearing for no-nonsense playing – no religiously inspired needling about here – and touches of the S. Wonder`s. Perfectly acceptable.

 
Suzi Quatro: `Your Mamma Won`t Like Me` (RAK). ***

Just as I had convinced myself that Suzi couldn`t sing and that I was going to loathe all of her records, those Chinnichaps write her a proper song and she does it all rather well. By the funkiness of the band and the major shift in emphasis of the production I imagine that `Mamma` may have been recorded with America in mind. The band plays beautifully while S.Q. does a teenage Mae West with such lines as “I like your stimulation but that ain`t enough.” This is a far, far better thing.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits –  please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Average White Band, Chick Corea, Gilbert O`Sullivan, Guess Who, Led Zeppelin, Trapeze, John Martyn, John McLaughlin, Billy Connolly, J. Geils Band, John Holt, Hall & Oates, Donovan, Country Joe McDonald, Golden Earring, Gary Moore.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Gary Moore FROM SOUNDS, February 1, 1975

An article from the time when Mr. Moore were on the verge of wasting away three years with Colloseum II, when he and Phil Lynott together were a match made in heaven. Well, at least that`s my opinion and I have nothing against Colloseum at all, but I just feel that Gary should have spent these years in another way than he did. He was such a great talent – we all miss his very emotional and wonderful guitar-playing.

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True Stories: boy protege comes good

Gary quits Skid Row and Thin Lizzy but finds happiness is a warm Hiseman

By Pete Makowski

Remember super speedo guitarist Gary Moore? Well it seems a lot of you do gathering from enquiries that have filtered into the office. The last heard from Gary he was in Thin Lizzy – a short-lived stay. Then apparently Gary went to Germany to sort things out.
In fact, Moore`s been in Britain since August when he met that ace skin beater Jon Hiseman. “We met out of musical frustration. We were both sitting at home thinking of packing it in. I didn`t want to do anything unless it was with the best people.”
Before we get into Moore`s present plans let`s take a look into his illustrious past, at only 22, Moore has matured into one of Britain`s major guitar talents.
Moore`s professional career began when he was sixteen with a band called Skid Row formed by bass player Brush Shields. Wasn`t it in fact Brush who taught Moore how to play?
“That was bullshit, I was playing for seven years before that… Brush taught me a few things,” he replied with a sly grin. “I had a lot of experience in that band but a lot of people wanted us to be something we weren`t… the next Led Zeppelin or something like that.”
Even then Moore`s guitar prowess was stunning to say the least. The band brought out two albums on CBS then split, from there Moore formed his own band. “I took what was available… there were so many hassles and in the end we couldn`t afford to keep it going. That band taught me a lot – never to do it again.
“The whole band didn`t pull its weight, some people were committed to the music and some were there for the ride. Carrying passengers doesn`t go down in my book.” Out of that came an album `Grinding Stone`. “That was supposed to be a double, it doesn`t sound balanced as a single record set.”
So again Moore moved on to join the ranks of Lizzy. “I had a good time but it got to the point where I realised that Phil (Lynott) didn`t need me there, his songs were strong enough, he just needed some people to fill out the sound.”

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Moore`s eyes immediately lit up when I asked him about his present position. At present the band consists of Hiseman, ex-Blodwyn bassist Andy Pyle and Gary. They are currently looking for a singer and keyboards player.
The band have been rehearsing five days a week for the last few months: “We get there at ten in the morning and go on through till five, there`s no mucking about. It`s difficult to describe the type of music we`re playing in words.
“We`re trying to set a different direction, not like Yes, but we`re not going to blow people`s ears off. I know we`re going to have a hard time when we start gigging. I know we`re going to get a hammering from the press or maybe go over people`s heads but we`re not going to change for anybody.
“Jon Hiseman has taught me a helluva lot,” said Moore with some reverence. “He played me things by people like Coltrane that I had never heard before. He also wants it to be known that this is not his band.”
The band have already written some material, Gary composes while Hiseman writes the lyrics then they work it out together in rehearsals. “Jon gives me the lyrics and I take them home, take them apart and work melodies out. “We do other people`s material like Joni Mitchell`s `Down To You` and a Jack Bruce number but they`ve both got our trademark.
“The good thing about this band is that we`ve had a lot of experience in the music business itself. We`re not going to be rushed into any deals, we`re all free of contracts. All the gear we`ve got belongs to Jon`s PA company so we`re pretty independent.
“We`re not going to record an album until we`ve been on the road for at least three months cause that`s when it`s peaking. And when we do record an album it`s going to have a very live feel.”
There`s still the vocalist to find, they`ve already tried Graham Bell and Steve Yorke. “There is one guy that I think will be joining but I can`t tell you his name at the moment. Y`see this band`s got so much scope, there aren`t any restrictions but the hardest part is finding suitable people.
“We`ve all been searching for a band like this. We`re all on the same level musically, all we have to do is take it by the reins and go.”
One of Moore`s future ambitions is to play with an orchestra. “If I did something like that in a few years time I`d be a very satisfied person. I`m starting to take my own direction as a guitar player. If you asked me about a year ago who I am influenced by then I would have said Hendrix or Zappa while now it`s different. My style changes every year… now I want to play 1975 style.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Average White Band, Chick Corea, Gilbert O`Sullivan, Guess Who, Led Zeppelin, Trapeze, John Martyn, John McLaughlin, Billy Connolly, J. Geils Band, John Holt, Hall & Oates, Donovan, Country Joe McDonald, Golden Earring.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) FROM SOUNDS, February 1, 1975

Just like Mr. Barton I find that this album is not the strongest in the ELO catalog. But still it definitely has its good moments. The album cover is kinda nice too, making you think of “Alice in Wonderland”.
Read on!

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Electric Light Orchestra: `El Dorado` (Warner Bros.)

Album review by Geoff Barton

Many have attempted to achieve the perfect synthesis between rock and classical music, and I dare say that the ELO have succeeded better than most – but even so this `El Dorado` album is far from their best, I think. It`s a curious, haphazard work that manages to touch on just about every extreme of the musical spectrum. On one hand there`s the fragmentary mixture of classical tunes – the titles of which you just can`t seem to put your finger on – at the beginning of `Boy Blue`: on the other there`s the straight rock and roll of the strangely-titled `Illusions In G Major`. The overall sound of this, presumably some sort of concept album, is quite insistent and decidedly uncomfortable. Jeff Lynne`s production is unsubtle and, at times, the whole thing comes out through the speakers with almost bludgeoning power. At the beginning `El Dorado` is immediately reminiscent of the Moodies, as guest speaker murmurs indistinctly and in deep tones over sweeping strings. This leads into `Can`t Get It Out Of My Head`, possibly the most outstanding track on the album, with memorable chorus – something ELO have always excelled at – and, towards the end, a tasteful exchange between synthesiser and violins. `Laredo Tornado` has Stevie Wonder undertones (this is turning out to be a strange mixture) and the first side climaxes in no mean fashion as rock collides with a mixture of, or so it seems, the themes from `The Magnificent Seven` and `The Big Country` together with the `William Tell Overture`. Besides `Illusions In G`, side two is notable for Lennonesque vocals on `Mister Kingdom`. This one`s a gently reflective tune for ELO – yet it still comes across with the force of a ten thousand watt neon sign. Most strange.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Average White Band, Chick Corea, Gilbert O`Sullivan, Guess Who, Led Zeppelin, Trapeze, John Martyn, John McLaughlin, Gary Moore, Billy Connolly, J. Geils Band, John Holt, Hall & Oates, Donovan, Country Joe McDonald, Golden Earring.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.