Month: May 2019

ARTICLE ABOUT Led Zeppelin FROM SOUNDS, February 1, 1975

To be “under the weather” out on tour must have been hell. When thousands await you on stage you don`t just lay flat on your back and cancel the show for any small reason. But I guess they had certain “remedies” in the seventies to help you survive the two hours you were obligated to deliver. Still – must have been tough if you were the frontman.
Read on!

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Limp Zep still reach heaven

Bad sound, flu and a broken finger can`t stop Zeppelin, Don Heyland reporting.

Led Zeppelin was alive, but not well in Chicago.
Robert Plant`s flu-ridden voice hurt the band in its first of three concerts in the Chicago stadium, the second stop on its tour. Jimmy Page was nursing a broken finger, too, although that didn`t make itself evident in any way, except perhaps choice of material.
What was worst of all was the old bugaboo of rock and roll, a goblin that seems to attack everyone from the most insignificant local band to the mighty supergroups: defective sound equipment.
In Led Zeppelin`s case, it`s understandable that the group wouldn`t want to be burdened with maintaining its own sound system if it only tours every year and a half. But they`re the ones who rented the system being used on the tour, so they must be held responsible.
Perhaps the audience sitting to the right side of the stage was luckier, but from a position fairly close up and directly in front of the PA speakers on the left side of the main floor, what was audible was mostly bass and drums, with a bit of guitar squeaking through.
One thing was sure: Neither John Paul Jones nor John Bonzo Bonham was under the weather. Jones`s bass lines sounded quite tasty all by themselves, and Bonham roared mightily at the drums.
On `The Song Remains The Same,` Jones actually duetted with Page, and very nicely.
As for Plant, he must have felt the irony of singing one of the five new songs, `Sick Again`, which song suffered too much from mixing problems to be absorbed.

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Plant did manage to marshal his strength for `Trampled Underfoot`, a grinding new rocker in the best Zeppelin tradition.
The best of the new songs, `Kashmir`, did not tax his voice too much, and even Page`s guitar came through enough on it to show that it will be a classic.
`In My Time Of Dying`, the old folk standard, also receives the Zeppelin treatment, and takes to it very well, even though the words sometimes don`t match the ripping attack by Page on slide and the booming rhythm.
`St. Peter at the gates of Heaven, won`t you let me in`, pleads Plant, knowing very well that the song is knocking down at those other gates.
The last new number, `Wanton Song`, is another rocker. It didn`t make much of an impression, but that could be because Page broke a guitar string at the start of it.
Other highlights of the concert were `Over The Hills And Far Away`, with Page`s fine fragile guitar work at the beginning and end contrasting with fiery playing in the middle: `When The Levee Breaks`, with Jimmy doing some marvellous slide work that I wish I could have heard better.
But of course, the finale of `Stairway To Heaven` was the highlight of the concert. It`s funny that this majestic, lyric number is, in the end, the song that stands for Led Zeppelin, a band associated with raunchy, high-decibel riffs and screaming vocals, but it definitely represents the group at its height.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Average White Band, Chick Corea, Gilbert O`Sullivan, Guess Who, Golden Earring, Trapeze, John Martyn, John McLaughlin, Gary Moore, Billy Connolly, J. Geils Band, John Holt, Hall & Oates, Donovan, Country Joe McDonald.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Golden Earring FROM SOUNDS, February 1, 1975

Never knew that Earring toured with Lynyrd Skynyrd until I read this one. Seems to me like a odd bill but that was what was so refreshing in the 70s – there were fewer “rules” and you could expect the unexpected. The band released their latest studio album Tits ‘n Ass in 2012 and are still a touring entity.
Read on!

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Dutch courage pays off

Strange chaps, these Golden Earrings. First `Up And Down Absurdia` was the title of their new album, then `Plus Minus Ubsurdio` and now it`s `Switch`. What`s going on? Geoff Barton investigates.

Golden Earring and Lynyrd Skynyrd were together responsible for one of the best concert series of 1974 – you remember, the powerful, if rather controversial double billed tour which, if nothing else, brought the rock year to an exciting and climatic close.
Heavy bets were laid and many a drunken pub argument was had as the question was raised time and again: which of the bands would emerge the better? When it was all over it was a very close thing – finally, it turned out to be impossible to decide.
Yes – it all worked out rather well and was, in all, a very fine package indeed. But what has been happening since then? Well, the Skynyrds are back in Muscle Shoals, working and recording for MCA; Earring are up to very much the same thing – they`re putting the finishing touches to a new album.
I met a busy Earring band at London`s IBC studios and first of all watched George Kooymans lay down a simple but particularly frenzied lick to enhance a virtually completed track for inclusion on the aforementioned album.
Then I went down with Barry into the studio proper to talk about the upcoming album. Is it still going to be called “Up And Down Absurdia”, Barry?
“No,” he laughs, “no, it isn`t. That was once its working title but, well, it isn`t any longer. Our first – rather cruel, I must admit – idea was to give everyone some different names and make a big joke about it all. We had this highly absurdistic feeling before we started this project, that was why the `Absurdia` was there, you know?
“Then I suddenly didn`t like `Up And Down` any more because I saw this album cover – I can`t even remember what it was – which happened to say `Up And Down, This And That`, you know? That always happens – you have something, then you come across something similar and you have to start all over again.

“So then it was changed to `Plus Minus Absurdio`,” he sniggers, “which is quite a funny switch because it`s exactly the same, only it sounds different. But, well, that was too trendy as well. Eventually we decided to keep it straight and simple and call it `Switch`. It`s a good compromise, it means so many things – like it`s a little plastic knob, or it`s an operation. A switch can be anything, you can switch neighbourhoods, switch jobs, switch ladies, you know.
“That was it. I came up with a song called `The Switch` and it all just seemed to fit. We came up with ideas for the cover and everything. All of it really worked well.”
Last time I met Barry he hinted that the cover for “Up And Down Absurdia”, er… “Switch” was going to be something very special, incorporating an alternative sleeve or two to confuse record shops and would-be buyers of the album. Is that still going to happen?
“It`s been, how do you say it, perfectioned?”
Perfected.
“Perfected. Perfectionalised – sounds a lot more English, doesn`t it? Yes, it`s been perfected now and it`s going to be designed by a famous Dutch artist, Corstiaan de Vries. It ties in very much with the title. There`s a lyric sheet, plus the alternative cover, photographed by Graham Hughes.”
Will the album still be a kind of concept album?
“Well, I think all albums are basically concept albums if they`re made in the same lapse of time in the same state of mind. But to me the real idea of a concept album is one which tells a story – in that fashion, I don`t think `Switch` is a concept album at all. But personally all the lyrics were written in the same period, so there`s a definite line in everything. It`s quite an ironic line, really, but I like to think of it as absurd rather than ironic.”
Make of that what you will.

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I mentioned the tour with Skynyrd. Were you pleased with the way it went?
“Oooh yeah,” he says, enthusiastically. “As a matter of fact we didn`t really want to play England at that time because of the lack of new product. People would come and say to us: `if you tour England and you don`t have a hit single out, well, forget it. You`ll just have 100 people sitting in the front row`. So we didn`t expect that many people to show up.
“But all the halls were really full and I think we did some of the best concerts we`ve ever done. It was really a fantastic show – Lynyrd Skynyrd are a fine band and I think people got their money`s worth.”
But all too often the media seemed more concerned with Skynyrd than with Earring, didn`t it?
“Yeah, yeah,” he says, as if he`s heard all this before. “That would have really worried me if the same thing had happened with the people in the hall – like if people were still screaming for Skynyrd during our set – then I`d probably freak out. But that never really happened. Skynyrd always played a fine set and they`re great guys and I`m not knocking them at all at the moment – but they never really stole the show, you know?
“So when it actually didn`t happen and people are trying to insinuate that it did happen – what can you do? It`s like somebody telling you that your nose is flat and your ears are sticking out 30 centimetres, and you look in the mirror and you see it`s not true. That`s a silly example, but you know what I mean?”
Earring are soon off to tour Holland, Germany, France and Belgium – there`s also a possibility of a one-off gig at the Rainbow before they leave for the States in April. If that single British concert doesn`t come off they`ll be into an extensive British tour almost immediately after they`ve finished American commitments – that means some time in the Summer. Meanwhile, “Switch” is released throughout the world in early March.
“This has been our dream for so long,” says Barry, “to have an album out at the same time – everywhere. Before, we`ve always had one album out here, another there and a real old one there. It was just one big fuck up, all mixed up and horrible.
“This is going to make things a lot easier for us.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Average White Band, Chick Corea, Gilbert O`Sullivan, Guess Who, Led Zeppelin, Trapeze, John Martyn, John McLaughlin, Gary Moore, Billy Connolly, J. Geils Band, John Holt, Hall & Oates, Donovan, Country Joe McDonald.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Montrose FROM SOUNDS, January 25, 1975

Norwegian Constitution Day is the national day of Norway and today, on the day, I celebrate by giving you this article on Montrose. This article also shows why Barton and Makowski later ended up together as journalists in the legendary rock magazine “Kerrang!”.
Have a good read.

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Paper money on Montrose

By Geoff Barton

“They`re very popular, you know, Montrose,” I insist. “Yes, well… at least you and Makowski like them,” comes the scathing reply from the rest of the SOUNDS staffers.
But really, they`re perhaps the most underrated band on the current Warner Brothers Music Show tour – which has now moved on from Britain and is currently resident in Germany.
Montrose, formed in 1973 by ex-Edgar Winter guitarist Ronnie Montrose, are a clean, simple and high-powered, if unadventurous, rock band with two albums to their credit – `Montrose` and the recently-released and more mature `Paper Money`. You may remember their `Bad Motor Scooter` single which, considering it was a bit raucous and noisy to be ideal BBC playlist material, got a fair number of plays; if you don`t recall it, then keep an ear or two open for `Connection`, their version of the Stones number, which looks set to be their next release.
Montrose have played Britain before – as support on a Quo tour and briefly at the Who affair at Charlton. I talked to their vocalist Sam Hagar the day after the band had played Manchester, on the same bill as Little Feat and Tower Of Power. How was it, Sam?
“Well, it was our first gig in three weeks and it wasn`t really too good,” he drawled. “My mike broke on the third song and that threw me – I wasn`t at all relaxed. But I`m looking forward to playing the Rainbow, I don`t think we`ve had a good show in London yet.”
I saw the band at the aforementioned Charlton concert – they came on at 11.30 am and could only play for 40 minutes – it was all rather disappointing.
“Oh, I remember I was quite hoarse then, I could hardly sing that early in the morning. But I guess it went down well. I was glad to play there, it probably did us more good than harm.”

Sam describes the band`s first album as a “blazer” – and I was surprised to hear that they recorded it with no gigging experience behind them: “Ronnie and I had known each other for just two weeks and we`d written all the songs for `Montrose`. It all came together,” he snaps his fingers, “just like that. Within two months we`d recorded an album, and it had so much spark on it it was unbelievable.”
And the second album, `Paper Money`?
“It`s a really fine effort,” he says, “I`m very pleased with it. It seems to me that the first one had more direction – you put it on, you listened to it, you knew what the band was like – but `Paper Money` is more varied, more mellow. I`d never really sung slow numbers like `Connection` before and it turned out really well.”
After the Warner Brothers` Tour Montrose go back to the States to hopefully play as support with Humble Pie or the Faces – they also want to break Los Angeles and record another album. “But I`m sure we`ll be back in England in the Fall,” Sam says.
Finally, what sort of spirit is developing on this current tour? Perhaps one of friendly competition between the bands – or something a little deeper?
“I haven`t felt any weirdness,” Sam replies, “but then it`s all just started and I don`t really know. It`s going to be something to see who comes out smiling at the end of it all, to see who gets the best response out of the whole thing.”
My paper money is on Montrose.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Jeremy Spencer, Kevin Ayers, Alex Harvey, Overend Watts, Little Feat, David Essex, Jeff `Skunk` Baxter (Doobie Brothers), Jess Roden, Joe Walsh, John Entwistle.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Judas Priest FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

This as a fun one. The very first album by Judas Priest reviewed sort of favourably. I think the title cut of this album is really infectious and I wonder why Mr. Makowski didn`t mention this possible hit song in his review of the album. Well, you can`t win `em all I guess?

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Album Review

Judas Priest: “Rocka Rolla” (Gull Gu11 1005)

By Pete Makowski

This album reminds me a lot of Black Sabbath`s debut record – It doesn`t reach the highest peaks of originality but I can understand why this band are gaining in popularity. This album will undoubtedly cater to heavy metal freaks. The cover is by the most excellent John Pasche whose style is instantly recognisable. But back to the vinyl: I remember seeing this band many aeons ago in a different form, and even then they managed to pack quite a punch. The next time I saw them was when they supported Budgie and they were fair. This album indicates that the band have improved musically, although it seems to be derivative and cliched at times. The most original track and also the longest is “Winter”, which features some interesting feedback effects leading into a quite melodic section. The rest of the numbers move quite well as the title of one track implies – “Run Of The Mill”. It`s a pretty disposable album, but shows promising indications of things to come.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, Roger Glover, Pink Floyd, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, George Harrison, Phil Spector, Bad Company, Janis Ian, Elton John, Thin Lizzy.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Phil Lynott (Thin Lizzy) FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

One of the biggest poets in hard rock music – always good to read about him and here we learn about his recent book of poems, a book that in its first edition have an price estimate these days of 150 to 200 Euro.
Enjoy this one.

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Music while you wait

Thin Lizzy`s Phil Lynott has written quite a few good lyrics in his time and now he has a book out “Songs For While I`m Away” with 20 of his songs in it. Here he talks to Geoff Barton about the book and Thin Lizzy Mk. III.

In my mind at least Phil Lynott is a first class, if not a foremost, rock lyricist. Perhaps it`s this which brings Thin Lizzy out of the bag of popular-but-pretty-boring-really bands, sets them a little apart from the rest, and gains them a certain amount of respect from fans and critics alike.
And though I`ve yet to see the new four piece Lizzy line-up, there`s no reason why they shouldn`t continue to be the same old solid, driving and powerful band that recorded “Vagabonds Of The Western World” and notched up no small amount of memorable live performances.
No reason at all… unless Phil abandons his bass guitar for quill pen and sets out to be a poet. Oho – that`s not in the least likely, but nevertheless he does have a book of poems or songs out at the moment, called “Songs For While I`m Away”.
It`s a brief selection of 20 or so of his songs, and most of them have been recorded at one time or another by the band, though not necessarily in the form in which they appear. They can`t really be categorised as poetry as such – they don`t really stand up to the transition on to the printed page – but if you can appreciate them as rock lyrics alone and nothing else, then they become quite superb.
The well-tried and popular rock lyric (i.e.: “Oooh baby, too much, yeah”) rarely says anything at all – no one worries about it that much, and more often than not it`s accepted as a matter of course. But Thin Lizzy lyrics are really the odd ones out. Be they about a juke joint and someone with their cycle outside (wanna try?), or about flagrant fields and schoolboy eyes, the Lizzy lyric invariably means something, tells a story of whatever.
And it`s a refreshing change.

INSPIRES

Lizzy`s management offices were pretty quiet – a typewriter clacked away in the background, and that was about it. Then Lynott & Co arrived, just back from a meeting with Phonogram, their new record company, to disrupt the whole scene. Lynott, clutching a Marvel Comic, strode into the room and caused quite a fracas. “What`s the Hulk`s other identity? Who`s the Silver Surfer?” he quizzed.
The interview, Phil. Oh yes.
“… Most of my songs are autobiographical,” he says in rapid, nasal Irish tones, “that`s what inspires me to write. If I experience something, and I think that experience is worth sharing with somebody else – then I write a song. My whole reason for writing songs is to share my experience with… whoever. Maybe the person who listens to our records, or has the book. I hope it`s an experience that they can relate to.”
Peter Fallon, poet and brother to B.P. Fallon, together with artist Jim Fitzpatrick suggested to Phil that he should get “Songs For While I`m Away” together. And so he did. He sent Fallon 50 or so poems from which he selected about 20, and Fitzpatrick chose a couple to illustrate. The above book was the eventual result.
Phil: “It wasn`t my idea at all. But Ireland is such a small place that you can easily get something like the book arranged and on the move. In England you need a reason to do this sort of thing. In Ireland you don`t need a reason. If you get your money back – great. If you lose it all – so what?”
There`s no chance that Phil will lose money on the book, for the first edition sold out quickly and it`s currently being reprinted. It looks like it`s going to be a steady seller for some time.

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PERSONAL

Some of the inclusions in the book struck me as being very personal exercises, notably one about a pregnant girl called “Little Girl In Bloom”, and another about racial prejudice entitled “Black Boys On The Corner”. I wondered if Phil was at all wary in revealing his personal thoughts to a wide audience.
“In the music it`s cool, but in the book it strikes me as being a little different. Recently I`ve been doing a fair amount of interviews concerning the book, and I find it really embarassing to talk about it. Sure I can talk about the book as a book alone – but the minute you sort of go into particular poems, it gets so embarassing, I figure I`ve said it the way I want to say it, so why should I expand upon it?
“But the nice thing about it is that people are looking at me now and saying: `yeah, he writes a decent lyric or two`. They realise that I`m not just a singer in a rock and roll band. So now I know that people are going to be listening to me, it`s definitely going to be harder to write songs. I want to try and make them more meaningful – I definitely want to spend a lot more time on them.
“But what`s really worrying me is that I`m doing more interviews about this book than about the band!”
Okay, so what about the band? The departure of Gary Moore led to the break up of perhaps one of the most visual three-piece bands, but the truth is that Moore wasn`t happy – he considered Lizzy a pop band, of all things. So, now we have Lizzy Mk. III, or thereabouts.

CRAZY

“All those personnel changes – for a while it was really bad, but now it`s beginning all over again. This Lizzy is the best Lizzy that`s ever been.” He pauses, as if expecting some sort of retort on my part, then continues:
“When we were a three-piece there was a certain emptiness in the sound, and we couldn`t explore the material sufficiently. But now the current band is playing… well, more like a band should play. With Gary we were like three individuals in one band, it was a crazy line-up, but as a live act we couldn`t fail.”
Gary Moore appears on one track called “Still In Love” on the new Lizzy album “Nightlife”, together with singer Frankie Miller. The rest of it is four-piece Lizzy with new guys Scott Gorham and Brian Robertson.
And before 1975 is out, there should be a Phil Lynott solo album, featuring material vastly different from the band`s usual stuff and showcasing him, if not necessarily in his capacity as musician, then in his capacity as a songwriter.
Phil: “I`m looking forward to the album more as a project than a product.”
And why not?

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, Roger Glover, Pink Floyd, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, George Harrison, Phil Spector, Bad Company, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.