Month: January 2020

ARTICLE ABOUT John Lennon and Yoko Ono FROM Record Mirror, May 6, 1972

This is part two of the interview done with John & Yoko. So read on!

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It`s your message that counts

…not your money or your physical power says Lennon

Jean Francois Vallee concludes our two-part feature with John and Yoko

 
Q: Do you think that New York better expresses the realities of the Western world?

JOHN: Yes. It is the most advanced place in the world.

YOKO: Also, there are 10,000 Japenese, millions of Jews, Greeks . . .

JOHN : Peurto Ricans, blacks . . . .

YOKO: Italians . .

JOHN: . . All the nations of the world are here . . . .

YOKO: . . . All the nations of the world are here . . . .

YOKO: An international city.

JOHN: The most cosmopolitan city in the world.

Q: You contributed (in Rolling Stone) to the demythification of the culture created around rock and pop music, but at the same time you destroyed the platform, the vehicle of your politics and the potential power that the Beatles represented in this respect. Does not this constitute a dilemma?

JOHN: Yes, but even on my own I still have a lot of power. I can mobilise the media, and what is power without the media, without access to the mass of the public? This power exists because of the Beatles and I had my share. Now John and Yoko are bigger than John Lennon, bigger than George Harrison or Paul McCartney. This is our power now and this power belongs to everyone. We are making it available to everybody instead of using it by the Beatles for the Beatles. We destroyed the myths of the rock culture because the musicians – and this is true of The Who and the Stones as well as for the Beatles – all spoke of politics in their music but did nothing in reality. We now belong to the Rock Liberation Front.

Q: And what exactly is that?

JOHN: The Front was founded by David Peel, an anarchist musician, and A. J. Weberman. The object was to liberate the ‘princes’ of rock for themselves.

Q: To demythify them?

JOHN: To release them so that they could do something for the people.

POWER

YOKO: We do not try to speak because we have a special power but because what we have to say is very important.

JOHN: What Aristotle Onassis says is not imortant, 0.K? Onassis says nothing that is worth repeating. Nor does Agnew, nor Nixon. They have a physical power but what they say is not worth a damn. You see, it is not money that counts nor physical power but your message.

Q: You believe profoundly in this?

JOHN: Weberman has proved this starting with nothing. He got access to the media by using his grey matter and saying what he has to say. People say, “Of course you and Yoko, you have these bed-in campaigns for peace, but only celebrities could get away with this”; but this is not true, anybody can do this. Anybody with the talent of Weberman could have done it. Anybody can have access to the media because the media are easy to reach.

YOKO: The power is in the message not in the name. The name doesn’t mean a thing.

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Q: What are the projections of the Rock Liberation Front?

JOHN: When the Stones go to make their tour in June for money, we shall do ours for free. What do you say to that Mick? (sarcastic laugh).

FREE

Q: ‘Revolution number nine’ has the image of ultimate confusion, a sort of end of the world. Do you think that this is going to happen?

JOHN: Oh yes.

Q: The apocalypse?

JOHN: Ah, the apopo, the apopo, what you said… is a very big word. That means the end of everything. Doesn’t it? I do not believe in the end. The end doesn`t exist, neither does the beginning.

Q: But there is so much confusion that the song seemed to sound like the end of the world.

JOHN: No. no, it was simply a sound image of May 1968, a simple collage of a revolution in progress.

Q: Do you still record sound experiences on tape recorders for yourself?

JOHN: Yes, and Yoko’s album contains a lot of this material.

YOKO: We work together.

JOHN: Before it was just for me, but Yoko persuaded me to release it. It was because of her that I made ‘Revolution number nine’. Now we are continuing with these ideas in Yoko’s work.

YOKO: Strawberry Fields was the first Beatles song I heard and it impressed me very much. I know nothing about rock or pop, but it touched me. There is that universality in John’s music. It is not necessary to know rock and all that culture unless it comes across, and this is what we are trying to do. To cut out intellectualism and modes and styles, and to communicate simply and directly.

HELP

Q: In most of your songs you allow the vulnerable side of your personality to appear: ‘I am a loser,’ Help,’ etc. It is like an appeal to someone or somebody.

JOHN: Yes, that’s true. When I wrote ‘Mother’ and ‘Working class hero,’ people said: “Ah, he’s becoming introspective suddenly.” But I was no more introspective than I was in ‘Help’ or ‘I am a loser’ or Strawberry Fields.’ The only difference was that they were no longer Beatles songs.

YOKO: The most important change now is the fact that we can communicate with people like Jerry. Before we were in an ivory tower.

JOHN: ‘Imagine,’ both the song itself and the album, is the same thing as ‘working class hero’ and ‘Mother’ and ‘God’ on the first disc. But the first record was too real for people, so nobody bought it. It was banned on the radio. But the song ‘Imagine,’ which says: “Imagine that there was no more religion, no more country, no more politics” is virtually the communist manifesto, even though I am not particularly a communist and I do not belong to any movement. You see, ‘Imagine’ was exactly the same message, but sugar-coated. Now ‘Imagine’ is a big hit almost everywhere – anti-religious, anti-nationalistic, anti-conventional, anti-capitalistic song, but because it is sugar-coated it is accepted. Now I understand what you have to do. Put your political message across with a little honey. This is what we do above all, Jerry, Yoko and the others, it is to try to change the apathy of young people. The apathy which exists in America but which is infiltrating everywhere because everyone follows the American pattern, above all because of the music. The life style of this century has been fashioned by America. Young people are apathetic. They think there is nothing worthwhile to do and everything is finished. They want to take refuge in drugs to destroy themselves. Our work is to tell them that there is still hope and still a lot to do. We have to change their minds; we have to tell them that it is O.K. Things can change, and just because flower-power did not work it doesn’t mean that everything is finished. It is only the beginning. The revolution has only just begun. It is just the beginning of big changes.

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The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT John Lennon and Yoko Ono FROM Record Mirror, April 29, 1972

This is the first of a two-part interview with John and Yoko. For the sake of history and for the pure fact that Lennon was an important member of one of history`s biggest and best bands this needs to be out there. I wonder what causes Lennon would have been engaged in if he were alive today? One thing is for certain – he would have strong opinions regarding political subjects and he wouldn`t be afraid to express them.

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`Capitalism killed the Beatles`

Jean-Francois Vallee talks to John and Yoko

John and Yoko, what is happening with you?

JOHN: Recently I have been doing a lot of Jam sessions without rehearsals. It’s been good. We have been appearing on the stage suddenly in the middle of a concert just to play with other musicians — e.g. at Fillmore East and Toronto, and then we disappear. But now I do not want to do this anymore. We are forming a new Group with Phil Spector on organ and Yoko and me. The band will be expandible according to the number of musicians who want to play with us. I do not want too big a nucleus, 10 musicians at the most. Local bands will be able to play with us if they want, either with the Plastic Ono band or on their own. The Plastic One band will be the one constant element on the tour. In each town we will ask musicians and theatre groups to appear on stage with us. We want people to participate and not just to stand there open-mouthed as if they were looking at God on the stage.

YOKO: If you throw a stone in the water, the important thing is not the stone, but the waves it creates.

Q: Yoko, what do you think of John’s songs?

YOKO: What I admire in John’s songs is that they are so simple that people can sing them and make their own songs out of them. They are as simple as a heart beat: bang, bang, bang. It does not come from the head, but from the heart.

Q: The ‘Imagine’ LP seemed to be divided into questions and answers with Yoko?

JOHN : Yes, I never really thought of that but it is true in a sense. There is only one thing that I can see as a response, and that is love. This is what I was saying when I wrote `All you need is love’.

STRUCTURE

Q: ‘Imagine’ gave the idea of somebody fighting a difficult battle.

JOHN: Everybody is fighting. Three years ago I would have been looking for a Guru or looking for the answer in Karl Marx, but not any more. I was looking for a father figure but I do not want that any more, thanks to Dr. Janov. That’s not the same thing. He gave me a kind of structure and I do not need him any more. He helped me to accept myself. He is like Freud really and he says, if people had understood Freud they would have attempted to relive the initial crisis instead of intellectualising in order to disperse their problems.

Q: Isn’t the essential message of ‘Imagine’: “Do not be enslaved by myths?”

JOHN: Yes.

Q: But politics is made up of myths. You would like to meet Mao. Is not he a myth?

JOHN: I would like to go to China just out of personal interest. Wouldn’t you?

Q: Yes.

JOHN: Well I shall go to China. I will take the opportunity to try to see Mao. If he is ill or dead or if he refuses to see me, too bad. But if I go there I want to meet people who are doing something important. It could just as easily be a youth leader. I am only saying Mao because may be that will help me to get to China.

YOKO: It is very important to go to China now, not only out of curiosity but because the world ought to go on getting smaller, and exchanges ought to be more and more open and be carried out more and more rapidly. China should not be isolated in a mystery. The mystery should be exposed and destroyed, and that will happen if we go there and they come here.

Q: The important thing is to communicate?

JOHN & YOKO: Yes.

Q: Do you not expect to find the answer in China?

JOHN: No, oh God no . . . I want to take a rock band to China. That is really what I want to do. To play rock in China. They have yet to see that.

YOKO: And we shall go there not only with musicians but with people like Jerry Rubin. As I have said, the message is music itself and Jerry has his own music and he wants to play.

Q: What is your political position at the moment?

YOKO: Same as yours.

Q: But it seems you are more involved than . . .

JOHN: . . . Than during the time of the Beatles?

Q: Yes.

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JOHN: The Beatles — that was something so enormous you just had to be a Beatle and nothing else. Being a Beatle took all your life and that was the problem. What I mean is that the Beatle thing became so big that it got to be a monster. It was not a monster at the beginning. The group communicated with people. They were the good times; we played in clubs and ballrooms and we spoke to people. It was really great. But then it became a kind of machine; it is like a guy who makes millions, like Rockefeller, or Getty, they become totally obsessed by money. How to look after their millions and how to make more. That is how the Beatles became. Think about the Beatles, for the Beatles and by the Beatles, and that is what I could not come to accept. There just was not any time to think of anything else. So the Beatles was just a period in my life. You know I have still got a long way to go. I lived 14 years of my life before the Beatles happened, and during 10 of those years I knew nothing about world politics. Nevertheless, if I did not have a political conscience, Marx and all that, I was aware of my own position in the working class in Liverpool and of being about to try to get into University and all the stupidities that go with it. So the Beatles were not so important. And now the Beatles are dead.

Q: If we were to make an inquest what would we discover was the cause of their death?

JOHN: Capitalism.

YOKO: It is dangerous when something becomes a myth; because they are all the same, they are all equal you see. When you asked us just now what our political position was, I said that it was the same as yours. We all have responsibilities in this Society because it is we who create that Society and everything that happens illustrates something in ourselves so we try to do everything we can by ourselves.

Q: I wanted to speak of the Beatles because that was really something for us, for my generation, something exceptional . . .

JOHN: Oh, for us as well.

YOKO: The Beatles was a social fact and also political in a sense.

JOHN: The Beatles had a social influence, a social impact. Then it became sterile, like a Government, that has stayed too long in power. When that situation arises you have to abdicate. So we abdicated . . . and now there are Santana, Marc Bolan, T Rex and all the new musicians. It is for them to carry on.

Q: Do you use your music as a means of promoting your politics?

JOHN: I am first of all a musician with lot of other interests on the side. You know, I believe that the situation that my political conscience puts me in is somewhere between “All you need is love” with the Beatles and “Power to the people” by the Plastic-Ono Band. In fact, what this really means is that I still believe in “All you need is love,” but I think also that now it is necessary to have something else as an additional aid.

Q: What do you think of the latest Dylan song, ‘George Jackson’?

JOHN: Hurrah . . . (He sings ‘George Jackson’) . I think it is fantastic.

CRISIS

Q: Do you think that he has suddenly taken a new political position?

JOHN: He has always been aware. People say Dylan has abandoned the Movement but Dylan was there before the Movement.

YOKO: That’s true.

JOHN: You see, Dylan exists with or without the Movement. We owe him a great deal of things. You cannot demolish the Beatles or Dylan because they have had a big effect and impact. It does not matter that Dylan has done nothing for six months or that he chooses to rest for a year, or that he is going through a psychological crisis, or that he has had an accident, or that he wants to live with four children and his family. Dylan has done what he has done and he continues. We ought to let him have a little time to breathe. He wrote ‘George Jackson’ despite attacks from everybody and not because of the attacks from everybody.

Q: Do you see Weberman as a creation of his nightmares, just as Manson is a little bit of a nightmare creature of the Beatles fantasy?

JOHN: In a sense, yes, yes . . Although Weberman has qualities. It is just that he has gone too far.

YOKO: There is always this duality. The ying and the yang. For example, a great machine like the Beatles — they were to create some beautiful things and at the same time some terrible things, and those terrible things happen, then people give them too much importance.

Q: You have decided to live in New York. You have lots of money and you can choose a place much more welcoming. Why New York?

JOHN: Yoko lived here for 15 years. Then she returned to Japan, and then she went to London, and from London she brought me back to New York. New York remains the centre of the universe for me, the centre of the world. Yes, it is possible that America is going in the wrong direction. Like Rome, she will destroy herself and fall in ruins, and yet, I would rather be in the centre than in provincial places, in Britain, or Wales, or England.

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The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Yes FROM Record Mirror, April 29, 1972

I really liked this interview with Steve Howe – the journalist, Val Mabbs, did a very good job here.
You`re gonna enjoy this one a lot if you are a Yes fan!

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YES – NO PLACE TO PLAY

Steve Howe talks about the venue problem to Val Mabbs

FOLLOWING an extensive tour of America, Yes returned home to find that not only had the Rainbow Theatre, where they had made several appearances, closed, but also London`s Royal Albert Hall had imposed a ban on pop and rock groups.
Two events that only illuminate the growing problem in Britain, where many excellent bands continue to emerge, but the work circuit continually decreases.
Steve Howe sat relaxing in his cosy Hampstead flat, pondering the difficulties of working in Britain, and the comparison to America.
“It’s getting to be much more tricky,” says Steve. “The failure of the Rainbow Room was really a shame, because to me it was the nicest and best gig to do and I was looking forward to going back there. I don’t like the idea of playing in a ‘swimming pool’ like the Empire Pool much — it’s a little cold.
“The last tour we did in October was of city halls, and we packed it out, but though we loved it I don’t think we’d like to do that again. We’d like to play where we can get more people together for more of an event.”

PERFECT

The latest idea among the group members is for Yes to appear at the Crystal Palace, following their return from a further American tour which is planned to begin in July.
“To me Crystal Palace seems the perfect venue because it’s very organised, you can get a lot of people there; there are trees and grass and a nice bank to sit on.
“We’ll definitely do a British concert probably there, and I’ve got a fascination for playing at the Roundhouse,” Steve told me, but admitted that a tour of Britain is not a lucrative prospect for any group. “From a group’s point of view you have to work very hard and not get much back — it’s not a nice way to look at England but you can’t make money here.
“This idea for Crystal Palace could turn into a small tour, but we’ve got to have a strong act with several other groups to see. We really hope to get Jonathan Edwards — a folk rock star yet to be ‘born’ in England! — and at least two other bands, but not out and out heavy rock groups.”
For six weeks, with only four days’ rest, Yes have toured America, and due to the vastness of the country and the abundance of colleges and halls to cover, could continue for years to return constantly. But despite the enjoyment they obtain from touring there, Yes have no intention of moving permanently to that vast country.
As they plan to go into the recording studios throughout the entire month of June, and will be spending a month prior to that in rehearsal however, Yes will not be appearing in Britain until their September concert.
The idea is to do an album with an American tour to run in the new songs and then to come back for the show in England,” Steve explained.
When I queried if Yes might not be interested in appearing on one of the festival bills he told me, “In a way they seem a little old-fashioned to me. A festival lasting three days induces so many bad spirits I think. They’ve been a success and I’m not wiping them out completely, but I like the slightly more reserved idea of putting on a show — when the sun is out!”
Mr Howe is greatly moved by the sun, and admits that although he wrote a large amount of new music during the first tour of America, which was in the summer, on the subsequent tours the flow has declined.

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IDEA

“I’m glad this time though that I wasn’t using up more of my energy writing with the cassette, although sometimes when an idea comes I regret I’m not near a tape recorder, because it’s good to capture the song as it comes; just for your own amusement.
“The tour was hard work, particularly on the West Coast where the audiences are a bit more resistent. On the East Coast our reputation spread very quickly, now we’ve covered the West Coast supporting for the third time and there’s been a gradual build up.
“This time was the first they’d ever heard us in San Francisco, which is a whole England if you like, and you’ve got to get that from one show … !”
On stage Yes’ act is developing naturally, but following their American tour, Yes plan to use their recording engineer Eddy Offord permanently to mix their on stage sound.
“Originally he came over to help with the live recordings,” Steve explained. “And he helped with the PA and was turning out some incredible mixes — now we hope he can always mix our sound. The problem is he can’t record the set and mix it on stage, so we just let some guy loose in there to record us live.”

TAPES

Eighteen boxes of sixteen track tape are now waiting to be sorted through, when Eddy returns from the States, and it is planned to use two of them, along with two live tracks from the forthcoming tour, for a live Yes album. The Yes studio album, will consist of one piece of music on the first side, based on events in people’s lives, with a loose theme of leaving places.
Just one more recorded item to look forward to is an album which Steve and Jon Anderson are planning to record with MD Johnny Harris.
“One side will consist of Jon’s songs, which Johnny Harris will be working on, and we’re hoping to do ‘Mood For A Day’ with an orchestra. All this takes a lot of work, and it’s in the early stages, but we’re taking the first steps.”
In the meantime Mr Howe, having rested for two weeks, is already hankering after working again. “I wanna play,” he says characteristically. And therein lies the essence of Yes!

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A fantastic product – or so it seemed?

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

ARTICLE ABOUT Suzi Quatro FROM Record Mirror, May 13, 1972

A short, but early article on Suzi from the time when she released her debut single. The single was “Rolling Stone” and didn`t chart anywhere – except going to number one(!) in Portugal.

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If you knew Suzi like the tattooist knows Suzi!

SUZI QUATRO is surely the ideal girl to take out.
She reckons one drink — top whack two — is enough to give her a friendly buzz. Doesn’t bother about eating. And needs only three hours sleep per night.
She’s also a hot tip from Mickie Most to become a positive superstar as from the release of her single “Brain Confusion”, which is out on the Rak label soon.
When Mickie speaks thus, most of us listen. Actually he discovered Suzi in Detroit when he was there to record Jeff Beck at the Tamla studios. He was pretty amazed to see the girls clamouring round Suzi when she was on stage.
He persuaded her to come to England seven months ago and has since recorded her, encouraged her to write songs. No public appearances as yet. But she’ll form a band.
In Detroit, she had her own all-girl band, Cradle. She’d been with them since she was fourteen. She went on to play bass, sing . . . and dance on a telly show as Suzi Soul.
Peter Frampton digs her vastly, after working on her single . . . “We wrote a song in the first twenty minutes we met,” said the talkative Suzi, who was performing in Vietnam when she was seventeen.
She currently has two tattoos on her person . . . a star on a wrist, a rose on a shoulder. “Where’s the nearest tattooist?” she asked me. I didn’t know.
“I wanna get something tattooed on my ass,” she said. “I haven’t made up my mind yet.”
Which is a funny message to have tattooed on your ass. Oh, I don’t know though!

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The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Ian Gillan (Deep Purple) FROM Record Mirror, May 27, 1972

To someone who didn`t know better at the time it would seem as Mr. Gillan was a Christian. First he starred in a very central role in the musical “Jesus Christ Superstar” and then he produced the band “Jerusalem”. Funny business for a man who later composed a song called “No Laughing In Heaven”.
Oh, well, this is a treasure from those golden days at the start of the 70s and I`m off to a concert tonight with some other fans of Gillan`s main band Deep Purple, namely the incredible musos of Dream Theater.
Enjoy!

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Svengali Ian Gillan tells of his first Purple Production

CAPTURING THE BIRTH

James Craig chronicles the progress of Jerusalem

POP MUSIC as someone once remarked is well left in the hands of youth and as some of our super stars totter towards the thirty plus signs it might be as well to offer some encouragement and help to those on the starting line.
Certainly that is the thinking behind Deep Purple`s vocalist Ian Gillan`s helping hand to four young men from Salisbury in a band with the unlikely name of `Jerusalem` with an even more unlikely titled single `Kamakazi Moth` (Decca) and an album just released.
Ian has just formed a new production company ‘Pussy Music’ and ‘Pussy Enterprises’ to which Jerusalem have become the first signings and last week he introduced me to half the group in the forms of Bob Cooke (lead guitar) and Paul Dean (bass) over a flagon of ale while he explained his involvement.
“My interest has been in an advisory capacity,” said Ian. “I didn’t so much produce the album as simply advise on a few technical problems and make some suggestions. I came across the band at a time when they were trying to get a record deal together and were in a state of confusion.
“In some ways its a nostalgic thing for me because I see them going through the same kind of problems and transitions that I did in the early days, before Episode Six even, when I was playing with little local bands in Hayes, Middlesex. I’ve always regretted that I never had any record of those early efforts because there was something about the brash enthusiasm of an early musical birth that you never recapture.
“I don’t want to give the impression that these boys are novices because they are not. They started playing almost as infants at school five years ago when Paul met up with Ray Sparrow and got a band together and later at college they met Bill Hinde and Bob Cooke.
“More recently they`ve brought in a new singer, Lynden Williams, and he has just the right kind of dramatics and vocal ability that convinced me that he had what it takes.”

Originally they started out as a `mean dirty blues band’ and moved through a phase they like to forget which was vaguely progressive which means everyone who came to see them sat on the floor like in-animate blobs and soaked up the vibes.
“Young people have just naturally got more energy than that and we want to see them moving about and enjoying themselves,” says Paul.
“Personally I feel that the ‘flashier’ a band is when they come on stage the better they look.
“I think people like Bolan have got it right – young audiences want to see something a bit exotic on stage. We are a flash band in that sense — a bit vicious and a bit sensual. We use a lot of volume but not as a cheap way to generate excitement.”
I think it was Paul who mentioned that the band had got a recent touch of ‘the support band blues’ playing second string to such formidable talents as Curved Air and Manfred Mann.
“Manfred has really got a very good little band together now,” said Paul. “He’s gone back to a basically pop format and it seems to be working. ” He was most impressed to witness the star playing chess in his dressing room prior to his appearance.
“The problem with playing in support of big name bands is that you know that they have come to see the headliners and you’ve really got to play your arse off to get any attention.”
Ian interjected to blow their own trumpet for them.
“Mind you,” he said. “I don’t care what anyone says it is the sole aim of any support band to blow the top of the bill off the stage and if anyone had got a ‘clapometer’ together I think ‘Jerusalem’ would have taken a few points off some of the bands they’ve worked with recently like Medicine Head.
“I don’t think we should give the impression that we go in with that attitude though,” said Paul guardedly. “I mean we found a group billed below us on a recent bill and I felt just a little embarrassed. It’s competitive without being cut-throat.”

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Paul Dean – Jerusalem

Jerusalem have already suffered at the hands of word-slinging record reviewers who like to discourage new rock bands before they have managed to make their first tentative steps but overall they are winning recognition for their musical exuberance and crowd pleasing performance.
Ian hit out at some of those critics who do not seem to care about anything formative or cannot necessarily compare to the technical proficiency of more experienced and qualified musicians.
“I really feel some of these critics who cannot accept the fact that so called ‘heavy music’ has now become pop music by virtue of the fact that it is popular are writing with their heads in the sand,” he said.
“Why is it that some writers seem to adopt this postion that nothing can ever be any good if it is widely accepted and why is it that some bands like Black Sabbath seem so anxious to put down the young people who come to their concerts and refer to them disragingly as `teenyboppers’.
“How would you like to be called a ‘teenybopper’ just because you happened to be young and like bands that retained some essence of vitality. That’s just something else I can’t understand.
A band is hungry so it becomes good out of that hunger. It gets recognised and successful then throws the acceptance back in the faces of the people who made them. It just doesn’t make sense.
“Critics who are not prepared to encourage new talent and make some kind of allowance that no band becomes as good as those who are on top immediately are doing no good to themselves or the business that feeds them. They slam a show which maybe 5,000 people dug and the unfortunate thing is that maybe a quarter of a million people read the review!”
All bands like ‘Jerusalem’ want is a chance to prove themselves and Gillan is doing his bit to lend a hand. More established artists with his attitude would be no bad thing.

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Would this ad be allowed in 2020? Not sure about that….

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.