Author: Geir Myklebust

ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM SOUNDS, September 18, 1971

I know there is a lot of Purple-fans following my blog, and I think they will like this review from Sounds today of the new-at-that-time album “Fireball”. Even if it is not that favourable, it is interesting to read what they thought of it at the time.
Earlier this year I saw the band in my home town and I must say that I was impressed with them. I think that Ian Gillan sings better now than he did 10 years ago. He and the band have adapted – keep away from “Child In Time” and everything is fine. And the band behind Mr. Gillan is what you may call “Seasoned Professionals” – the kind of musicians that is capable of blowing you away with their capabilities both as single instrumentalists and also as a group. You should go see them before they retire as you won`t see many bands of their like in the future.

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Deep Purple: “Fireball”
(Harvest SHVL793)

By Billy Walker

Purple`s place in British rock music is assured, which is just as well because there isn`t too much on “Fireball” that would further their cause, apart from two good tracks “Demon`s Eye” and “Fools”. The feel of the album, apart from these two numbers, is dominated by the drums / bass / guitar heaviness that is almost impossible to escape from with bands in Deep Purple`s musical area. True “Anyone`s Daughter” is a chirpy little ditty with acoustic guitar and piano, but unfortunately it doesn`t work. “Fireball”, the opening track, bursts out from the speakers like a bomb, a breakneck number urged on by Ian Paice`s drums, stabbing guitar and some space-age Lord organ, by comparison “No No No” is quite leisurely, but “Demon`s Eye” rocks better than any of its predecessors. Ian Gillan bares his chest more, Lord Jon lays down some attractive organ parts and guitarist Richie Blackmore gets more of a chance to show his hand, the tranquility and dream-like opening to “Fools” – light organ lines and drums – is shattered by fine old heavy rock bass/drums throbbing and Gillan`s rasping vocals. Add to this Blackmore`s wah wahing guitar and Gillan finally getting up a full head of steam and you have the only other good piece on the album. You can`t help but get the feeling that DP could have come up with something better – there`s no reason why all the tracks couldn`t have been up to the standard of “Demon`s” and “Fools”, the band are capable of it.

Fireball

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: John Lennon, Humble Pie, Soft Machine, Albert Lee, Bob Dylan, Mountain, Elton John, Titanic, Jim Gordon, John Coltrane, Brian Auger, Rankin File, Archie Fisher.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Titanic FROM SOUNDS, September 18, 1971

Many bands outside of the English-speaking countries have at almost all times had an extra challenge in trying to break through worldwide. The language barrier is there for those who doesn`t sing in English, and then there are those who sing with such an accent that it makes it harder for them to be taken seriously.
With an English vocalist, the Norwegian band Titanic shouldn`t have experienced those problems, but still never became a household name. Famous in Norway for having the first international hit for a Norwegian rock-band, the single “Sultana” also made it to No. 5 in the UK. Check it out on Youtube if you never heard it before.

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Titanic – did they sink or were they pushed?

By Billy Walker

Titanic, four Norwegians and a Briton, attempt next week what many “Continental” bands before them have failed to do with any real convictions – make it in Britain. For varying reasons their contemporaries just haven`t made an impact, Burnin` Red Ivanhoe perhaps the only real exception, and they too did not really build up any hard and fast following.
The most obvious disadvantage for any of these bands is the language barrier – the vocalist trying desperately to wrap himself wholeheartedly round English lyrics – and this does have some bearing on a band regardless of their ability as musicians.
But Titanic, French based but working all over Europe may have a trump card in British vocalist Roy Robinson, the rest of the band talk pretty good English and their material is all done in English. This, added to the fact that there`s the need for new faces around now, could help Titanic in their bid over here.
CBS Records are suitably impressed with their property, their single “Sultana” has shown a steady increase in Britain, and so far there are dates at the Marquee (September 20) and the Lyceum (26) and the possibility of a TV spot.

VENUE

With this in mind CBS sent over a party of four journalists (including myself) and two CBS representatives to catch the band live in Belgium, not Brussels as you might expect but Hasselt, quite a large and important town that stands on the Demer river and no doubt owes its name to the Belgian romantic poet Andre Henri Constant Van Hasselt.
The Germinal Hall (more shadows of literary genius here) was the chosen venue and Titanic were expected to set sail around 9 in the evening or 21.00 as we know it now, but due to their equipment having to come all the way from Spain (their gig the day before) by road things went pretty much as unexpected from then on. With all these hang ups it was the audience in the tiny, over-crowded and terrifically hot Germinal Hall that felt it most and they showed it later.
I`d seen them streaming into the hall around 7 p.m., there was no supporting act just Titanic and a disco to fill in the time until the band went on stage. The equipment arrived late, the crowd got hotter and less tolerant, the band didn`t go on stage until after 11 p.m. and when they did the amps were far too high and the sound obviously hadn`t been balanced properly.
Despite it all Titanic roared in Santana`s “Soul Sacrifice”, (a band with who they have quite a few musical line-ups consisting of guitar, organ, vocal, drums, timbals) and the audience seemed to like it. “Santa Fhey” (another of their hit singles on the Continent) and “Sultana” got the same sort of response but when the lights in the hall and the band`s equipment fused, it seemed like the straw that broke the camel`s back.

A few pleasantries from stage were met with either dis-interest or heavy expletives in return and although the band were really trying to get things to take off it was without result. The over amplification was such that inside the tiny hall it was hard to separate instruments correctly but from outside they sounded good.
It`s hardly fair to assess the band`s potential in Britain by this performance. The vocalist punishes his voice to incredible lengths to get a really hard rock sound, guitarist Janny sounded, beneath the banks of amps, to have a nice style and the organ really propelled the band along in their Santana-inspired excursions.
But at the Marquee, which has never claimed to be Britain`s most acoustically perfect venue, Titanic should be much more at home and will have the chance to show what they are really about and they`ll sink or swim on their ability. In Hasselt they sank but I think they were pushed a little.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: John Lennon, Humble Pie, Soft Machine, Albert Lee, Bob Dylan, Mountain, Elton John, Jim Gordon, John Coltrane, Brian Auger, Rankin File, Archie Fisher.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Elton John FROM SOUNDS, September 18, 1971

A man capable of composing a song like “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” will always be of interest to this blog, so it is with great pleasure that I give you this early concert review to read.

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ELTON – thrills his audience

By Chuck Pulin

A lady hurricane named Doria which dumped over six inches of rain in the New York area couldn`t dampen the fervour of Reg Dwight or the 8,000 members of the audience who turned out to rave at and over Elton John.
Asbury Park is about a two hour drive south of New York in the state of New Jersey. I would be correct in saying that Brighton and Asbury Park resemble each other. It was there in the neo gothic convention hall built in the 1920s that Elton gave the third concert of his latest American tour.
Having seen Elton at least a half a dozen times in the last few years, I had wondered if I would be bored by his stage performance. Would it lack lustre having gigged so many times in the last year?
I am able to report that Elton has not become dull and his performance on stage is one of the most exciting I`ve seen in recent months. With his mates Dee Murry on bass and Nigel Olsson on his ever expanding drum kit, Elton proceeded to thrill his audience, and got them cheering over and over again.

Dee and Nigel were introduced and finally Elton came out, this time wearing a purple cape, which he doffed revealing his electric green tee shirt and his “Woolworth Bermuda shorts” with high striped socks. Then started with “Friends”, moving into “Ballad Of A Well-Known Gun”, which was followed by “The King Must Die”.
He then asked the musical question “Can I Put You On” and sang a “Song For You”. Other songs were “Country Comfort”, “Honky Tonk Woman” and “Tiny Dancer” from his new LP due out in the first week of November.
“Take Me To The Pilot” was a prelude to a rave up version of “Give Peace A Chance” and in the middle Elton went into a ten minute free form piano riff, which stunned the crowd.
By this time I retreated from the audience to the safety of the stage and watched as Elton danced on the piano with his back to the audience.
Viewing Elton up close in concert is a must. He`s warm and humorous and works hard to please his audience. I am left with the vivid impression that Elton unlike many other musicians LOVES working before his audiences, and tries his damnedest to please the people who come to see him.

It`s hard to put in proper terms the physical excitement he creates and the huge amounts of energy he draws upon. Elton in my humble opinion joins Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, and Leon Russell in that same style of showmanship.
The two sets I saw at the Convention Hall, on August 28 in Asbury Park, topped the sets I`ve seen Elton do at The Fillmore or Carnegie Hall. I can`t ignore Dee and Nigel who have also improved along with Elton. Nigel`s drum kit has grown – but so has his range. The bass lines that Dee quietly plays make him the third important member of the trio.
If it seems that I`m biased about Elton, Dee and Nigel, you`re more than half correct. I would be delighted to be super critical of any band that does not earn your respect or your money. However, you`re safe with Messrs. John-Olsson and Murry. I`m just unhappy that I`ll have to wait perhaps six months to a year to see them perform here in the States again!

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: John Lennon, Humble Pie, Soft Machine, Albert Lee, Bob Dylan, Mountain, Titanic, Jim Gordon, John Coltrane, Brian Auger, Rankin File, Archie Fisher.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Tony Iommi (Black Sabbath) FROM SOUNDS, September 4, 1971

One early interview with the master himself. Not a good start on the interview for Mr. Telford, and it seems to me that Mr. Iommi wasn`t too fond of or experienced in this situation at that time.
Good stuff anyway, so have a nice read.

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The SOUNDS Talk-In

Tony Iommi of Black Sabbath

By Ray Telford

Can you tell me how the group started?

How we started? Look back in one of your papers and you`ll see it. I think we`ve done that one before. At the start it was just me and Bill (drummer Bill Ward) who were together and Ozzie and Geezer were in other groups. We all knew each other anyway, and to cut a long story short we just got together. This was in Birmingham.

Three years ago, by all accounts, you were playing a lot of jazz material and making a good job of it.

Well, we weren`t doing anything at all with that sort of thing and we just sort of got into something a bit heavier, you know. We liked it and it just kind of progressed and progressed from there. But even now there`s touches of jazz and things we put in sometime on stage – just to get back into the old thing.

MATERIAL

What are your answers to people who continually criticise Black Sabbath on their choice of material?

Well, we play it mainly because we like it, you know. We like what we`re doing – we just like the heavy thing. We found it was exciting and really got into it and that was it.

CHANGE

Did the crowds enjoy the music at first or was it simply something you wanted to play regardless?

We played it because we liked it. Then the crowds got to like it. We wouldn`t change if the crowds stopped liking it. If the heavy thing wentout we wouldn`t go on to something else that was new, like soul.

That`s what your advert says: “We would rather starve than change”.

Yeah, that`s it because we did starve when we started. We had nothing and nobody would book us, or listen to us or just take any time to bother. It was then that we were starving because we wanted to stick together and keep our music. That was it.

SOUNDS

What differences do you see between Black Sabbath and similar bands, like Led Zeppelin or Grand Funk Railroad?

That`s hard. Every band has their own sound. Grand Funk have their own sound, Mountain have theirs and I think we have ours, even down to words and vocal harmony. Mountain have got a sort of Creamy sound like vocal wise – they`re really good. Then there`s us, like, we sing about things that are happening. We all sing about different things.

MARKET

So you`re all playing for the same market?

Oh yeah, we`re playing mainly for the same people.

What age group is that?

In England? Well, it has varied, you know, since the single. When we first had the single it was bought by twelve and thirteen-year-olds or something but that dropped off a bit and we got back to sixteen to eighteen year olds.

What about America?

Well, you get any age there. It`s unbelievable. You can get, like, some who are about thirty or forty or whatever it is who come along and do like it. But mainly in the States it`s around eighteen.

Would you agree that Black Sabbath are looked on in the States as more of an underground band?

I think that in the States people are more into music. Like they`ll go miles to see a band and they seem to get more involved with the group. They know about you personally as well and they just get wrapped up in it all.

Who writes the band`s lyrics?

Geezer, the bass player, writes most of the lyrics. Some of them are very doomy but they vary from that to drugs and the bad things that are happening with the band. You know, just the sort of thing that people know about and groups can sing about.

Would you say your music has a lot to do with drugs?

No, I wouldn`t say it was druggy but it`s something that people know about. But in the songs we get the chance to mention all about drugs and things. We like people who come along to the gigs to get as much as they can out of it because we can get into it when we`re on stage. We try to relieve all the tension in the people who listen to us. To get everything out of their bodies – all the evil and everything.

Does this hark back to your original publicity where Sabbath were supposed to be involved in black magic?

Well, that was nothing to do with us anyway. You know somebody got hold of it and blew it up to such an extent that it took us six months to get it down to say that we weren`t black magic.

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EVIL

There is still an evil element in your music, though?

Yeah, there`s this kind of feel about it. See a lot of people in the States come and say how mysterious a lot of the songs are but they build this up in their heads before they even come to see us.

MELODY

Do you think that the melodic content in a song is still important for it to sell?

What if it`s got melody? Yeah, well some of our songs have got a melody bit in them. Like on the first album we`ve got a few melody bits in that sort of catches the ear. I suppose it`s all important, really.

What was the story behind you joining Jethro Tull?

Oh, I`ve forgotten now. I was only with them three weeks because we were just into two different things. We were going in different directions.

Why is it do you think Black Sabbath are so popular in America?

Well, we go down amazingly well. It was just one of those things that you can`t believe has happened. `Cause in America we made it so quick you know, we came up fast. The first tour went really well and the word spread around and by the second tour we were headlining at the Fillmore which has never been known for a group on its second tour.

SLAGGED

What are your reactions when people dissect your songs and read things into what are probably meant to be harmless lyrics?

Yeah, you get that everywhere. We try not to think about it. It`s like getting slagged – I mean we`ve been slagged so many bloody times now. I get to wonder sometimes, you know, there must be someone else they can slag. You just get used to it.
For instance I remember one review of our first album and it must have been given the worst rating ever and the things they said about it I thought: “Oh, Christ, this is it,” and it really brought us down because we wondered if everyone else would think the same. It`s just like one man`s opinion. It`s true that the black magic publicity might have influenced some people in their opinions of the first LP and that`s why it pissed us off to hear about all this shit that we were doing spells.
The audiences knew what we were doing but the reporter who came along and had never seen us just took it for granted that we did do black magic and all that sort of stuff.

What differences are there between your new album, “Master of Reality” and the group`s last two?

It`s a bit more varied than the other two. Like I did a little acoustic thing that lasts for about thirty seconds just to give it a little break. That`s all it was meant for because it breaks up the rest of the numbers. It makes a little change and then people will notice the heavy things more. Instead of doing an album of all heavy numbers that little classical thing and a slow number where I play a bit of flute shows what we can do – we`re not just a heavy band.
We love playing jazz and we`ve surprised a lot of people in what we can play in jazz because what we play now is very loud and basic and people find it easier to get into. What we played before was a bit complicated and people couldn`t grasp it – “What the hell`s this sort of thing?”

NEXT ONE

How much further can you go with your present type of music?

That`s a hard question. Well, we hope to go tons further but where it`ll go to nobody knows. After “Paranoid” someone asked us what the next one would be like and we just hadn`t a clue – no idea at all.

How much of your material is worked out in the studio?

Well, on the “Paranoid” album, we wrote “Paranoid” in the studio – five minutes that was.

The words too?

Well, it just took Geezer a few minutes to write them down. There was a couple we wrote in the studio off “Paranoid” and I think there was one off the first. The last album we wrote the one with the flute in the studio.

CLASSED

When did you start playing flute?

When we played jazz and that sort of thing I used to play flute then. Of course, I got the usual people saying it sounded like so and so and it was like Roland Kirk so we thought “get rid of that”. See, you always get classed with someone else.
If a new group comes out now they`re like Led Zeppelin or like Black Sabbath or Deep Purple and they`re not given a chance but there you are, what can you do? As long as the people like it, though, I can`t see any harm in it myself.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Carole King, Audience, Jethro Tull, John Cale, Stud, Steve Cropper, Charlie Parker, Bernie Taupin, Helen Reddy, Alan Bown, Moody Blues, Curtiss Maldoon, Seals and Crofts, Osibisa, Poco, Hawkwind, Peter Bardens, Open Road, John Lee Hooker, Jimmy Reed, Keith Christmas, Freddie King, Beach Boys, Dave Ellis.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Rick Wakeman FROM SOUNDS, August 28, 1971

This excellent article is also an example of how I think when I DON`T edit what I think may be a mistake in the text of an article. In this article there is a mention of someone called “Nick Simpler” who I think may be the former Deep Purple man Nick Simper. I don`t edit this in the small chance that there actually was someone called Nick Simpler jamming in Brentford. So now you know – I`m not just totally ignorant of these things.
Have fun reading.

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Just another Yes man…

By Penny Valentine

When he was six years old Rick Wakeman`s father dispatched him to a very fine lady piano teacher in Harrow. Two lessons later the infant Wakeman had decided to be a concert pianist. He never actually made it to the concert platform – all kinds of other small diversions like football, girls, and bands kept getting in the way. But he did make it to the Royal College of Music in London, where, at his first clarinet lesson, he stunned the entire teaching staff. Not exactly by his brilliant virtuosity, but because he collapsed at their feet in a drunken stupour.
From such humble beginnings mightly acorns grow and today Rick Wakeman is a fine musician who last week started a new and happy chapter in his life by joining the increasingly talented Yes.
To be honest he didn`t exactly look ENTIRELY happy when I met him on Wednesday, but then it had been an exhausting five days. After 124 hours without sleep our tall thin blonde hero was beginning to wilt – not unexpectedly. His days split between recording his first album with Yes and then rushing off to Trident to complete session work he was committed to and only time for a quick breakfast at home in between.
Musically his joining up with Yes couldn`t have come at a better time. The band had already decided that for their tour of Britain this autumn they would work on a whole new stage concept barring all old material in the act. So Wakeman comes in at the beginning of a new Yes era able to add his ideas and become an integral part of the band from scratch.
As the temperature soared into the clammy 80s in London, and we threw down as many cold cokes as we could. Rick brightened up and agreed that – by pure accident – it had all been a very lucky series of coincidences:

BENEFIT

“I think it got to the point with the Strawbs when we just weren`t right for each other. I`m sure we`ll all benefit from the split because we were beginning to compromise a lot on ideas – like we`d use half of my ideas and half of theirs – and I don`t think it was helping what was eventually coming out. We ended up lacking challenge. Complacency set in, and for the last couple of months we just weren`t working. I went back to doing a lot of session work and then three weeks ago, Steve Howe, phoned and asked me if I`d like to go along and play a bit with Yes and see how we all got on.”
For Yes, Rick turned out to be exactly the musician they needed – a man with ideas a very high standard on five keyboards including Moog and organ. For Wakeman, Yes turned out to be the most enthusiastic hard working band he`d ever met:
“I found all the ideas I`d had before but never used, waking up and coming to the surface. And what happened on the first session was that I found the ideas. Yes had about their music and direction were very similar to mine. We have a complete understanding and they`re incredibly enthusiastic. I think Yes are going to get much bigger than they are now and if they don`t, well, all I can say is that it certainly won`t be through lack of work or enthusiasm – I`ve never known a band work so hard it`s a wonder they haven`t all collapsed by now.
Yes, of course, it`s been great coming in now when they`re working on all new material. On the tour I think only about ten minutes out of the hour and a half act will be old stuff. Like they`ll probably have to do “No Disgrace”, and there is a piano solo I did with the Strawbs we`re thinking of putting together with Steve`s guitar solo “The Clap” but that`s all. I don`t think you can integrate old thought and new thoughts.”

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On stage Rick plans, for the first time, to use all five keyboards and so Yes`s live sound will have a chance to expand even further:
“I suppose it sounds a bit flash but it`s really for the sake of having exactly the right sound. We`re using four keyboards on the album and I think it`s only fair to an audience to get the sounds over live the same way – I don`t like substitute sounds anyway. If something`s definitely needed than I don`t see why you shouldn`t use it.”
Wakeman`s reputation as a musician has grown so huge over the past couple of years, he`s been one of those people that you think has been around for ever that it comes as a surprise to discover that actually Yes is only the second professional group he`s played with.
He started with semi-pro bands at 14 when he was still at school and the recollection of those halycon days brings him out in a rash of laughter. His first great break came with the “Atlantic Blues”, band where he played a Woolworth`s organ using the speakers from two old radios (“Needless to say the result was – dreadful”) and one of their first gigs was at the Neasden Mental Home.
“I think the crunch came when we were the interval group at the Byron Greenford for 30s. We were so bad it was the shortest interval in the history of the place.”
But things picked up after that. Fast and furious he moved into a trio dance band for gigs at the British Legion Greenford and Rick became the richest kid in his class, then to Ealing Social Club (£12 a weekend); Brent Borough Social Club (£15 a week); his own band at 16; Ronnie Smith`s dance band (£15 a week) where he joined the “ranks of the moth eaten jackets and punch-ups”. After joining the Royal College he worked as a freelance and then started session work for Denny Cordell and Tony Visconti. Then back to Ronnie Smith (£28 a week this time) because he`d just got married and needed the money. By now he`d left the Royal College and had started doing sessions with a band called The Strawbs: “The highlight of my week was at the Red Lion Brentford where jam sessions went on with John Entwistle, James Royal, Nick Simpler, Mitch Mitchell -everyone turned up for these incredible rock and roll evenings, and I was really honoured to be there playing with these great musicians.”

FAMOUS

By now Wakeman`s session work was becoming famous. He played the classic mellotron passages on David Bowie`s “Space Oddity”, and was a regular session man for Al Stewart, Ralph McTell, Cat Stevens only recently popping up on T. Rex`s “Get It On”.
The Strawbs, who he`d worked with on “Dragonfly”, one day said why didn`t he rehearse with them? And promptly turned up with a crate of beer and offered him a place in the band on piano:
“We had some fabulous times, there`s no doubt about it. I was knocked out the first time I saw my name in print when I was with them. It may sound flash but it`s great, I just sat there staring at it. But at that time the band were incredibly in debt and the equipment was farcical. I had an old Hammond I`d jumped up and down on for years and was a wreck and we had to shift all our own equipment because there were no roadies. Then we got new management and things picked up. I think the standout point was when we did the Kilby Hall gig it did us so much good it just built up from there.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ten Years After, Elton John, Link Wray, Richie Havens, Tom McGuinness, Terry and Gay Woods, Monty Python, Bo Diddley, Edgar Broughton, Mike Harrison, Sam Charters, Miller Anderson, Allan Taylor.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.