Deep Purple

ARTICLE ABOUT Jon Lord (Deep Purple) FROM SOUNDS, April 29, 1972

Some very interesting musings in this article with maestro Jon Lord, one of the most important organ players in the history of rock. This one should please the Deep Purple fans out there. Enjoy!

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Lord of the deep

Interview by Steve Peacock

Jon Lord was at home in Barnes, and slightly bewildered to be so. For the second time in six months, Deep Purple had to cut short an American tour, and both times for the same reason. Last time, Ian Gillan got ill, with hepatitis; this time it was Ritchie Blackmore`s turn.
“I`m trying to work out what I`ve done wrong,” said Jon. “It doesn`t seem fair that the same group gets hit twice by hepatitis in six months – both times in the middle of an American tour. It seems that every time we go there we take two steps forward and one back.”
“To me, `Machine Head` (the new album) is the apex of what we started to do with `Deep Purple In Rock`, and I don`t really think we should carry on along quite the same line I think we should try and go round a few corners with the next one.
“Some people say about the group, probably with some justification, that we don`t seem to have progressed very far since `Deep Purple In Rock`, though certainly inwardly each musician has progressed enormously – the writing talents have improved, our way of working together has improved, and we`ve got a much better working relationship between ourselves and with an audience. But where some of that justification lies is in the fact that we haven`t really deviated from the very set line, and I think it`s time we started to shoot for the stars a little bit more.”

In other words, having consolidated their position as a tight, heavy rock band, it was time to be a little more adventurous. “My feeling has always been that with our tempos – the speeds we use and the kind of rhythms we choose for our numbers, could be a little more inventive. I think we`ve sometimes underestimated the ability of our audience – the people that like us – to accept something a little bit more. Just because people like `Hard Rock`, unquote, it doesn`t mean it has to be in 4/4 or a shuffle.
The talents of the band are equal to far more than we`re doing, while not putting down what we`ve done on the last three albums, and we`ve learnt a lot in that time. But I think we could now extend our boundaries a little bit. That doesn`t mean that we should do something in 5/4 just for the sake of doing it in 5/4, but we shouldn`t throw out the possibility of using different times and styles, bent to our own style.
“I think we`ve always been a little scared of losing what we gained with `Deep Purple In Rock`, because each individual in the band had spent so long trying to achieve something, that when you eventually get there half of you is saying you should perhaps move on from there, while the other half is saying `don`t knock a good thing`. I`ve seen it happen to so many bands – the first successful thing that happens to them tends to re-write their career for them for the next year or so.”
As he said, it`s something that happens to a lot of bands, but did he tend to think in terms of what might be good for the band`s career?

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“Not any more. The trouble is that when you`ve got five people in a band you`re going to get five different ideas of what`s going to be good for the band`s career. But for instance I`d think it would be excellent for our career to show a reasonably significant movement in direction on the next album. But I usually try to think as little as possible in those terms and more in terms of what would be good for the music we play, which will eventually determine the career anyway.”
So for him, whatever promotion and things the pop business gets up to, the music will out in the end? “I think it`s the only thing that`s got to matter in the end. On the rare occasions when we have over-concerned ourselves with extra-musical considerations, I think we`ve taken a little tumble. You know, when we`ve let ourselves be co-erced or co-erced ourselves into doing things just because they`d be good for our career. I`ve often found that because it`s either destroyed something we`ve been trying to build up musically, or it`s destroyed someone`s confidence in you because you`ve gone against a couple of principles they admired you for, it`s in actual fact not helped our career. So I like to think of the music, and everything we do going towards that, and our performance on stage, and try not to be involved in anything else.
“But I hate talking about `The Music` – it always sounds a bit false to me; especially when we`ve said over and over again that we`re basically a rock and roll band, and a loud and fairly unsubtle one at that. I`d like to think we could be just accepted as that, and then if we do something that`s a natural extension of that, but perhaps, a bit surprising…”

It was, he admitted, a great temptation to go out on stage and play the things you know are going to go down well, and they`d fallen into the trap sometimes. And he, like Ritchie, had gone through a stage where he played “as many semiquavers as I could”. But they`ve both changed their ideas on that, and today Jon says he`d like to be known as “a reasonably funky organist” more than a speed king. As to the future of Purple, he says it`s really a question of using what they have:
“The thing is, I think, we`d like to stay within the structure of the band as it exists – which is a five piece rock band using organ, bass guitar, drums and voice – and use it in any way possible to increase the ability of the group to entertain.”
Like most bands, Purple had had their crises in the past, but now they seemed to be settled. “I think we`ve reached a lucky point in our lives where we can afford to take things at the right tempo, rather than that dreadful spurt we did after `Deep Purple In Rock` was big; we were working so hard then that the most simple argument could develop into `I`m going to leave` with no trouble at all. Now I think we`re a little slower coming to the boil.
“But you see the band still thoroughly enjoys playing on stage in front of an audience – there`s not one member who doesn`t feel that`s still the best moment, so I think just from that point of view the band will probably stick together. A couple of us are at the point now where we probably wouldn`t join another group if we left this one.
“But it all depends – it could last another three years, or it could last another three months; you never know when a group`s at this stage. It`s a happy unit and a successful one, so it could concievably go on for a long time, but somebody might just get to the stage where they think they`d really rather be doing something else.
“And I don`t think the group would continue if one person left – we`ve reached such a point of interdepenance. I`d be able to tell you better if it happened, but I think we`d call it a day.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Wishbone Ash, Maggie Bell, David Clayton-Thomas (Blood, Sweat & Tears), Matching Mole, Marc Bolan, Ornette Coleman, Peter Frampton, Rod Argent, Rita Coolidge, ELP, Robert Altman, Happy And Artie Traum.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM SOUNDS, December 4, 1971

It is always fun to read articles from way back, especially when one knows the history of a band as well as many do with Deep Purple. Some funny moments in this one for those “in the know”.
Have a nice read!

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Blackmore the Purple egotist

By Dick Meadows

The anatomy of a heavy rock band in today`s pop society is a complex one. The sweat and toil reaps reward in terms of enormous audience adulation and financial profit. But there is a difficult cross to bear at the same time and that is to be branded whipping boys in rock.
Led Zeppelin and Ten Years After have become almost institutions whose stature has lifted them above the bitching. At the other end of the scale Sabbath and Uriah Heep are down there in the muck-raking mire nailed to this cross by critics. That the cross seems to be made of pound notes and fan hysteria obviously makes it more bearable.
Just about balancing the see-saw of respect and smears is Deep Purple who have laboured for four years to achieve a mountain of success but still get slagged off rightly or wrongly for allegedly playing stereo-type, formula rock.
Purple`s stance in this situation is fairly predictable. They get hurt by the harsh words, fail to understand a lot of them and then begin to resent them. In about that order. “We still seem to upset many people but sometimes I really can`t see why.”
The speaker is Ritchie Blackmore, lead guitarist with the band. On stage the man is extrovert and an instinctive entertainer. But now in an office block high above the Christmas lights of Regent Street, W. 1., he sits quietly, an introvert who has to be coaxed into talking about his music and the group he has grown famous with. He admits that he seeks rather to play rock than have to interpret it through the process of question and answer.

SLAGGING

Blackmore talked easily enough, though, about criticism and Purple`s philosophy here. After all the band has had a good amount of practice in coming to terms with slagging which quite often they simply haven`t earned:
“We tend to consider what will please an audience. We think of that first and then what will please us perhaps second. So sometimes we get put down for playing fairly simple riffs. But you have got to consider the people you are playing for. That`s what it is all about.

ATTITUDE

King Crimson, for instance, turn out some very good stuff. I like things they do but what happens is that a lot of it goes over people`s heads.
Yes, we take criticism to heart but our attitude is not to talk about it too much. If we kept talking about what people were saying and what some reader from East Grinstead has written in a letter to a music paper then it would have a bad effect. We`d always be thinking, “Are we doing the right thing?”
It`s funny really, some people have such closed minds about Purple and other groups as well. When you are coming up there is encouragement but the same people who have encouraged you will then knock you down when you got some kind of success. Uriah Heep are having this happen to them, and they don`t deserve all the criticism.
You know, John Peel won`t play us. He says we play formula rock and that`s that. I don`t know where that man is at any more. I did once but not now. Have you heard some of the people he is playing now? And people he has helped build up, he has turned his back on.
Blackmore was speaking after a four-week break from pounding out rock on the road. Purple were set to go to North America this month until vocalist Ian Gillan was stricken with hepatitis. For a time he was very ill and the tour was postponed until January. Now Ian is recovering but is still weak. In the meantime the band has been taking things comparatively easily; the only time they get to rest is when one of their number is ill. Otherwise they work themselves to a standstill.
During their enforced lay-off organist Jon Lord has been working with Tony Ashton, bassist Roger Glover has been doing some producing, and Ritchie and “Little” Ian Paice, the drummer, have been playing with a third guy – who Ritchie won`t identify – as a rock trio. They have put down some songs and one will be released as a single in the new year under a name that gives no clue to its Deep Purple heritage.

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ACCLAIM

“Let people hear it and maybe like it, rather than pick up the record and say, `Oh that`s Deep Purple, don`t like it and won`t play it`.” That`s Ritchie`s view.
The inevitable fragmentation during Gillan`s illness perhaps provides a clue to the future. Individual members of the band are inclined towards virtuosity on stage – Blackmore admits he is an egotist when playing – and they are eager to solo and take their fair share of acclaim. Whether they can continue to get sufficient personal satisfaction is doubtful, although obviously they`re not anxious to destroy the huge success story that has taken a long while to write.

MERGING

Nevertheless there have been musical clashes within the band in the past. Lord, for instance, is keen on merging rock with classics. Blackmore wants to remain more exclusively in rock.
The new album which is now being planned, takes on greater importance in this light. It will be recorded soon in the Rolling Stones` mobile studio at Montreux, Switzerland, and the probable title is “Machine Head”. Ritchie is excited about the album because the past few weeks have been a perfect opportunity to formulate a clear vision about what should go on it. The release date will probably be March and Ritchie is frank about its importance:
“This next album will show what Purple`s future really is. I personally didn`t like the last one, `Fireball`, too much, but this one I think will really get to the people. With `Fireball` we virtually made everything up in the studio, `give us a riff`, that sort of thing. We were working so hard that we never had any time to sit back and think of new ideas for the album. There are only three tracks I think are good. “No. No. No`. `Fools` and `Fireball` itself.”

DIRECTION

The lead guitarist reckons “Deep Purple In Rock” is the finest thing they have done on record. It showed them going in one clear direction which they weren`t before and that includes “Concert For Group And Orchestra”. Which way they go now remains to be seen. It promises to be a significant fifth year for the band from Deep Purple.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frank Zappa, Rikki Farr, Bob Dylan, Nicky Hopkins, Bunk Johnson, Country Joe and the Fish, Steve Marriott, Ian Hunter, Roy Harper, Emitt Rhodes, Charlie Wills, Melanie.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM SOUNDS, September 18, 1971

I know there is a lot of Purple-fans following my blog, and I think they will like this review from Sounds today of the new-at-that-time album “Fireball”. Even if it is not that favourable, it is interesting to read what they thought of it at the time.
Earlier this year I saw the band in my home town and I must say that I was impressed with them. I think that Ian Gillan sings better now than he did 10 years ago. He and the band have adapted – keep away from “Child In Time” and everything is fine. And the band behind Mr. Gillan is what you may call “Seasoned Professionals” – the kind of musicians that is capable of blowing you away with their capabilities both as single instrumentalists and also as a group. You should go see them before they retire as you won`t see many bands of their like in the future.

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Deep Purple: “Fireball”
(Harvest SHVL793)

By Billy Walker

Purple`s place in British rock music is assured, which is just as well because there isn`t too much on “Fireball” that would further their cause, apart from two good tracks “Demon`s Eye” and “Fools”. The feel of the album, apart from these two numbers, is dominated by the drums / bass / guitar heaviness that is almost impossible to escape from with bands in Deep Purple`s musical area. True “Anyone`s Daughter” is a chirpy little ditty with acoustic guitar and piano, but unfortunately it doesn`t work. “Fireball”, the opening track, bursts out from the speakers like a bomb, a breakneck number urged on by Ian Paice`s drums, stabbing guitar and some space-age Lord organ, by comparison “No No No” is quite leisurely, but “Demon`s Eye” rocks better than any of its predecessors. Ian Gillan bares his chest more, Lord Jon lays down some attractive organ parts and guitarist Richie Blackmore gets more of a chance to show his hand, the tranquility and dream-like opening to “Fools” – light organ lines and drums – is shattered by fine old heavy rock bass/drums throbbing and Gillan`s rasping vocals. Add to this Blackmore`s wah wahing guitar and Gillan finally getting up a full head of steam and you have the only other good piece on the album. You can`t help but get the feeling that DP could have come up with something better – there`s no reason why all the tracks couldn`t have been up to the standard of “Demon`s” and “Fools”, the band are capable of it.

Fireball

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: John Lennon, Humble Pie, Soft Machine, Albert Lee, Bob Dylan, Mountain, Elton John, Titanic, Jim Gordon, John Coltrane, Brian Auger, Rankin File, Archie Fisher.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM SOUNDS, August 21, 1971

A short article on Purple and a little bit about The Faces. Not the greatest piece of journalism but it is always nice to read anything written about bands this early in their career. And these days, when we do miss the great, late Jon Lord, it is a pleasure to “hear” from him again. So enjoy, my friends.

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A purple passage in Texas

Allan McDougall reports from Hollywood on Deep Purple in America

It`s 3 P.M. on a 95 degree Hollywood Friday afternoon, and you`re sitting high in your office thinking Friday thoughts of the beach, or the mountains or maybe the desert. Your intercom buzzes and your secretary says there`s a Jon Lord at the gate, should the guard let him in?
Then you remember tonight is the night to go down to Long Beach. Not to tour the Queen Mary, all high and dry and hamburger and cake stands, but to see Jon Lord and his organ and Ritchie and Roger and Little Ian and singer Ian who are gigging at L.B. with Rod Stewart and the very big now Faces.
You run out and meet Jon and say, “Far out, didn`t think you`d have time to fall by, watcha up to?” And Jon, as elegant as ever in his Avis renta-thing says, “I came in early to buy an organ – bloody airlines dropped mine.”
But first: liquid refreshment. Which in 95 deg. Hollywood means not the boozer because (A) there`s no pubs in L.A., really, and (B) imagine the kind of hangover you`d get in that kind of heat.

TOUR

So, sitting sipping our strawberry malts, Jon tells us about this tour of America:
“Actually, it been the best tour Deep Purple have done of the States. The most worthwhile so far. Gigging with The Faces has been so good. You know, obviously in most places we`ve played it`s been their audiences – Especially in Detroit and Chicago, which is where Rod Stewart`s label, Mercury, is headquartered.

ENCORES

“But in Texas, it seemed like they`d all come to see Deep Purple. Anyway, we usually had to work very hard to get the audiences going, and always got encores – which meant that The Faces also had to work especially hard to follow us. All of which meant a lot of fun for the audiences at every show.”
Knowing that Ritchie Blackmore is not quite the world`s No. 1 America fan, we ask if the man in black is digging it?
“Yes, Ritchie`s really getting into it at last, bless him. Now, he can see the sense of it – we all can. Did you know that our new album, `Fireball`, shipped 55,000 in the last three days?”
We pause to faint for a minute, because that`s a whole lot of albums for 3 days, and we think that all the signs that told us “At last Deep Purple are going to really do it in the States”, all those signs spoke with straight tongue.
“And there`s re-orders coming into Warner`s from all over the place,” Jon smilingly concludes.

JAMS

Later that day my lady and I drive down to Long Beach, but the traffic jams caused by the 20,000-odd people with tickets (and the 10,000-odd ticketless people) all trying to get in make us late for the show, and we get there at the end of “Strange Kind Of Woman” which goes down well.
Then Purple sneak into “Child In Time” which really gets the audience going. Having seen Purple perform in Paris and Berlin and London last year, we observe one big change in the act, and a nice one, too. Ritchie does an incredible solo where his guitar sounds like some monstrous cello.
Then comes the usual closer, “Mandrake Root”, great as ever with the strobe-lights and all, and the audience go crazy and Deep Purple should be very proud and happy.

EFFECTIVE

A word or two about those Faces: they are fantastic. Rod was just great, prancing around in his leopard-skin suit and while Mac and Ron and Ronnie and Kenny may not be the world`s flashiest musicians, they probably are the world`s most effective.

BOPPING

From “It`s All Over Now” to “Maybe I`m Amazed” to the Everly`s “When Will I Be Loved”, through old favourite “Country Comforts” and “Every Picture Tells A Story” new favourites “Maggie May”, they had the entire audience bopping happily at their feet.
And that was the best rock show South California`s seen in some years.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ravi Shankar, Mickey Finn, Roger McGuinn, Rick Nelson, Howard Riley, Eddie Harris, Mike Albuquerque, Supertramp, Mark/Almond, East of Eden, Woody Allen, The R&B Show, Terry Reid, Viv Stanshall, Louis Armstrong, Joseph Spence.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM New Musical Express, March 20, 1976

Just a short concert review confirming that the music journalists could smell a break-up coming. They were absolutely right when it came to Purple as this was one of their last concerts until the reformation in 1984.

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Wembley

By Tony Stewart

At the Empire Pool, Deep Purple rule.
The roaring audience of ten thousand or so press their hands to their heads as their ears get pinned back flat by the band`s first number, and David Coverdale steps forward.
“We`ve come to quash rumours that Purple have finished.”
Lapping up that welcome news, the crowd call for more, little realising in their ecstatic bliss that within the group things do seem decidedly amiss. It`s not only possible, but highly probably that changes in personnel will occur.
Even backstage, an aura of discontent is evident before the gig. There`s no feeling of an event about to happen, which a Wembley gig certainly should be. And the obvious joviality between Lord, Coverdale, Paice and Bolin (Hughes isn`t around) is only superficial. To me the spirit of the band seems drained.
Weariness is offered as an excuse, but more likely discontent is creeping in. Like an unattended case of dry rot.
And back on stage under the elaborate lighting for the first of their two nights at the Pool, the evidence that something`s fundamentally wrong with the present Purple concept is about to unfold.

Admittedly, their second number, “Lady Luck”, proves that the present line-up can work. Coverdale slices his voice, pitched dangerously higher than his natural range will safely allow, through the thick carpet of organ chords laid by Jon Lord, while Ian Paice, on drums, and Glenn Hughes on bass, create as solid a rhythm as anyone could wish for. Tommy Bolin, his long hair tinted a variety of colours, splatters the piece with some frenetic guitar soloing to justify his position as Blackmore`s successor.
It`s a well integrated five-piece, as startlingly direct as a glass of cold water down your neck, but the impact is diluted by bouts of blatant indulgence and internal political games.
Although there`s a fairly high degree of individual ability within Purple, their talents are certainly not directed towards group unity. As Paice slams into the uptempo meat of “Gettin` Tighter” like a gale slamming wooden shutters against a wall, Coverdale is pushed off stage so that Hughes can handle the vocals.
And from this point on, with the exception of Lord`s soulful “This Time Round,” the act is virtually a rotation of solos from Hughes, Bolin, Lord and Paice.
The results are both predictable and bizarre.

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As is to be expected, too much instrumental freedom leads to abuse of the privilege. Lord`s main solo deterioriates into sub-Emerson electronic noise, and Bolin blows his rating with the audience by strutting his talent like a two-bit whore who promises the goods, teases, and eventually doesn`t deliver.
The main weirdness exists between Bolin (who invariably seems on the point of losing his balance) and Hughes, who face each other like two fighting cocks sizing up one another`s potential threat.
But Coverdale gets the rough deal. So infrequent and brief are his appearances on stage that he fails to establish a firm rapport with the audience, and “Speed King” seems a contrived finale.
What Purple lack is conflict. Gone is the jousting of organ and guitar for space that used to exist between Blackmore and Lord which created so many spontaneous solos. An occasional clash between the vocals of Coverdale and Hughes wouldn`t be out of place either.
Instead, they all merely go through the motions of a formula which becomes increasingly boring as the set continues. And you can even tell when the dry ice is going to be poured onto the stage.
No, they`re not finished. Not quite.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of New Musical Express also contains articles/interviews with these people: Laura Nyro, The Eagles, King Crimson, Phil Spector, Dick Morrisey and Terry Smith, Zal Cleminson, The Who/Steve Gibbons Band, Bobby Womack, The Tubes.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 15 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.