Deep Purple

ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM SOUNDS, October 25, 1975

Time would definitely tell for this record. A very interesting perspective from the time it was released here. Do you agree with Mr. Barton?
Read on!

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Purple: tastes good, but…

Deep Purple: `Come Taste The Band` (Purple TPFA 6715) 39 mins.

Album review by Geoff Barton

Deep Purple have undergone personnel changes in the past and have always successfully pulled themselves through. Happily, `Come Taste The Band`, featuring guitarist Tommy Bolin in Ritchie Blackmore`s stead, brings the band out of their most recent crisis – although not as thoroughly nor as completely as you may have hoped.
This is a particularly fine rock album – but is that really enough? Although `Come Taste The Band` is on a rung above both `Burn` and the jaded `Stormbringer`, it`s not quite up to the required height. To justify their position as one of the world`s top bands and to quell the somewhat cynical rumours that they`ll never be able to fully recover from Blackmore`s departure. Purple needed to come up with a killer LP, something that would stand up proudly alongside the likes of `In Rock` and `Machine Head`. This isn`t it.
Tommy Bolin is an accomplished guitarist; of that there`s no doubt. He`s slotted into the band as neatly as a well-worn key into its lock. He`s injected a heavy dose of fresh energy – I haven`t heard Purple play with such boyish enthusiasm in a long time. His guitar work is succinct, immensely fluid, but never overbearing – indeed, `CTTB` displays a much freer, give-and-take musical attitude than even several early Purple albums.
The problem lies with the quality of the songs. Bolin`s songwriting prowess (he`s contributed eight numbers) is OK – yet he`s a long way from being able to write numbers of the calibre of `Space Truckin“, `Smoke On The Water`, or even (to switch to `RB`s Rainbow album) `Man On The Silver Mountain`.
Even so, they`re not appreciably different from the band of old, here – if anything, they seem to have consciously adhered to tradition, with numbers like `Comin` Home` (even though it has brief `Quadrant Four` guitar) and `Drifter`.
There are snatches, however, that may serve to betray the direction in which Purple may move in the future: the initially punchy `Love Child` has an incongruous funky section, together with what could well be Billy Preston`s moog. `Gettin` Tighter` and `I Need Love` have brief funk passages, as well.
Still, before I get too tied up in (minor) criticisms, let it be said that there is a lot to get excited about, here: notably the rampant `Dealer`, with its `Purple Haze`- like opening, timely ballad section and Hughes` meaty vocals more than making up for its hackneyed lyrical theme, and `Lady Luck`, a potential single.
`Come Taste The Band` is an album that stands head and shoulders above your normal mundane rock release, but at the same time the question must be asked: does it show enough potential and promise to ensure the new Purple a safe passage into the future? Time will tell.

Deep Purple

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
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ARTICLE ABOUT Roger Glover (Deep Purple) FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

I will let Wikipedia say what needs to be said about this one: “The work was originally conceived as a solo vehicle for Jon Lord to be produced by Roger Glover who had recently left Deep Purple. However, Lord proved too busy with Deep Purple, and Glover took up the reins on his own. Using his connections, Glover recruited a large cast of noted rock musicians, with a different vocalist for each character, including David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes.”
Read on!

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Glover has a ball

By Pete Makowski

Roger Glover is a satisfied person nowadays. Since his departure from Deep Purple, Glover has steadily been building up a good reputation as a record producer and now his new venture, “The Butterfly Ball”, will gain him respect as a musician and composer.
“I always felt that people expected certain kinds of things from me,” said Roger, “when I was approached to do this project, I thought `shall I do something really heavy and rocky, or shall I do the complete opposite`. Then I decided to do exactly what I felt was right, not just live up to everyone else`s expectations.”
“The Butterfly Ball And The Grasshoppers Feast” is the title of a book illustrated by Alan Aldridge (well known for “The Beatles Illustrated Lyrics”) around the poetry of William Plomer. Now Glover has taken the idea of the book and transformed it into music.
The music from the album is going to be used in a forthcoming cartoon serial based round the book and there are also possibilities of a film and a play.
The unlikely marriage of Aldridge and Glover resulted via British Lion who first met Roger via Purple when they filmed their “In Concert” performance.
“We used to get lots of offers to do film scores, but I never really considered it before although I did check them out. And when I left the band this came along and it interested me right from the start.
The next move was to write the music. “I didn`t write anything until it got close to the deadline, I find I work better under pressure.
“A lot of the numbers involved experimentation. I had to find out which vocalist would suit a certain number. If it didn`t work with the people at hand then I would hire a session guy.

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“I hope people don`t treat this as the soundtrack album, it`s the `Butterfly Ball` a thing of its own. Songs from the album will be used in the series when it`s made and sold, and I wouldn`t mind doing the incidental music for it because it`s something I haven`t done before.”
The projected cartoon series will be done by Alan Aldridge and Lee Mishkin. The pilot of the film is definitely in the Disney class. The film has that kind of appeal which will attract both the juvenile and adult market. Terry Flounders has the job of making “The Butterfly Ball” a household name – as he did with the Wombles. It`s a winner, although Roger can see some pitfalls.
“I can see a couple of things that would hold it back. Primarily my name. Y`see the album can`t exactly be described as a family album but then again it`s not anything in the mould of Purple. When people hear it they immediately put it under certain categories, which is something I can`t stand. This album should stand out on its own as much as within the context of the film… it`ll be interesting to see what the critics say.
“I`m really glad to be off the road,” said Glover, “although I`ve got to admit I did think about getting a band together. I sometimes miss gigging which is different to the high pressure touring schedules with Deep Purple.”
Glover puts his career with Purple well into the past, although he doesn`t knock it, he feels it has contributed to his cynical outlook towards the music business. “There are so many false people you can meet in a business like this it`s untrue.”
Glover`s production ventures have brought him much success and satisfaction. “It was when I started producing I realised I wanted to write again, cause when I produced a band I`d find myself writing parts and changing parts for them which I don`t feel is the right thing for a producer to do.
“I`ve been living in Kingsway (Ian Gillan`s studio) for the most of this year and I`ll be taking a rest for a while… I think I deserve it.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, George Harrison, Pink Floyd, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, Bad Company, Phil Spector, Thin Lizzy, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM SOUNDS, June 8, 1974

A short, but sort of funny review of this concert. A short mention of the Dio-led ELF too. Nice.

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Concert review

By Pete Makowski

Purple hit Coventry with two evenings of good music and sheer lunacy to mark the end of a triumphant British tour. Everything seemed quite normal at the opening of Elf`s set. They have developed into a highly polished professional unit. Ronnie Dio displayed his powerful vocals on a searing rendition of “Happy” from their current album “Carolina County Ball” and the delivery of this number was so crisp and powerful that the audience surged towards the stage in appreciation.
Suddenly from nowhere a “dirty great big” bag of flour hit Ronnie on the head. More of them seemed to appear from the corners of the stage and soon enough the whole line-up of Stephen Edwards (guitar), Craig Gruber (bass), Mickey Lee Soule (piano) and Cool Guy (drums) were covered in dat white stuff. The audience, who were looking a bit dead, didn`t seem to react to this attack.
Next on were Purple, kicking the set off in fine form with “Burn”. They played their asses off and the set ran smoothly apart from a mysterious incident involving a bottle breaking against the side of Glenn Hughes leg. Blackmore featured some really fine soloing and Ian Paice did a mindblasting solo in “You Fool No One” which went into “Mule”. David Coverdale displayed his vociferous vocals in “Mistreated”. It was a great set, not their best, but they were out to have a good time.

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They too were bombarded with flour at the end of “Space Trucking”. By this time the audience were on their feet and cheering and the band came back on for an encore which was “Going Down” which culminated with a line of trouserless roadies having a knees up across the stage. To finish this off a certain gentleman, who has been described as the entertainments officer, strode across the stage in black tights, knee-length boots and hat, looking like the son of Max Wall, and bared his buttocks to all.
Backstage after the show the scene was comparitively calm. Jon, Dave and Glenn were getting ready for their trip to Germany the next day where they will be performing Jon`s “Gemini Suite” and everyone was bidding each other farewell. Two burly characters confronted me “don`t forget to mention Pad of the plank and Jim for their excellent job on security”, uh okay, boys.
This tour has proved the new line-up to be a viable proposition, and this is obviously a skeleton of what to expect in the months to come.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bryan Ferry, Captain Beefheart, Jim Capaldi, Lee Jackson, Uriah Heep, Byzantium, Denny Cordell, Ronnie Lane, Blue, Nutz, Arthur Brown, Harry Chapin, Groundhogs, Genesis.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

ARTICLE ABOUT Glenn Hughes (Deep Purple) FROM SOUNDS, January 5, 1974

By having two articles concerning the same band straigt after one another I break a principle I usually have, but sometime life is more exciting if it is not entirely predictable. My friend Rad from Russia agrees with me when I say that you can`t really have too many articles about this band, so here is a really good article for you to enjoy. You can not be a fan of hard rock and dislike this fantastic band. So there…

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In at the deep end

Pete Makowski interviews new man Glen Hughes

At the tender age of twenty-two Glen Hughes has acquired something all musicians strive for and often never get: security. That magic word ensures your daily meal and keeps you in the musical limelight. Recently after the hasty departure of Roger Glover it was confirmed that Glen Hughes was to replace him.
Joining a band of Deep Purple`s stature has definitely given Glen Hughes a more predominant position in the music business and made his future much more secure. He has kept quite cool about the whole thing although when I spoke to him at the Park Hotel in Frankfurt he seemed very excited about the reaction the new Purple were receiving.

SURPRISE

I asked Glen how Purple originally spotted him. “It started about a year ago,” he replied with a slight tinge of Brummy accent. “Trapeze were playing in Miami Beach while Purple were on vacation. We were both staying in the same hotel and we met and we were playing some gigs in the same area and we used to go and see each other. I never knew they were checking me out, so it came as a complete surprise.”
I asked if he was worried about the fact that he and vocalist David Coverdale had taken the place of two people so well established within the group.
“I was a bit wary about it because at first I said no and yes. I said no because I wanted to sing, I didn`t care about anything else except although I love playing bass as well but I wouldn`t play with anybody if I couldn`t sing, because I love singing.
They (Purple) said it was OK because I would be singing and after that I went through a very horrible phase after the first month I had joined `cause they were looking for a singer, but they wanted two singers, but soon things became clearer and I realised they wanted to change the Purple sound by having two singers.”
What was the feeling at the time of Purple`s split?
“Fucking great! Because it was obvious the relationships weren`t good within the band and they knew they were going to split it just had to happen. It was planned that July was going to be the last tour.”
For people who aren`t too familiar with Trapeze, Glen`s previous band, they were a three piece comprising of Mel Galley (guitar), Dave Holland (drums) and of course Mr. Hughes (bass/vocals). The band originated as a five piece and released an album on Threshold. The strongest feature on the first effort was the powerful harmonies. The group eventually diminished to a trio and their second album – “Medusa” – was a start to the funky rock-soul feel they had.

Trapeze proved to be fairly successful in parts of America especially Texas where they shared their fans with ZZ Top, another hot three piece who were very close friends of theirs. They even had a chart entry in the States, “Black Cloud”, from the “Medusa” album, but alas they were cruelly ignored in Britain.
Even when the media buzzed with excitement on the release of their last and best album “You Are The Music, We`re Just The Band” there was still no flicker of hope for this ill-fated outfit.
I asked Glen how he felt about leaving Trapeze. “I was really happy with them, the only difference now is that now I`m getting treated better, I`ve got more money, which I don`t give a damn about because I`ve got lots more years to worry about something like that.
“But the thing is it got to a stage with Trapeze last year where it was so good and so tight but we weren`t getting anywhere at all. We did nine tours in America and we were just breaking it in some areas and that was after three years, there was no hope.”
Bass players and drummers are regarded as the guts of the band. I asked Glen how easily Ian Paice and he adapted to each other`s styles. “I felt as if I`d been playing with Ian so many years, because he`s so tight it`s a great feeling.”
How he felt the band had changed when he joined? “It`s like a new band, they`ve still got the three main guys in Purple. Ian Gillan and Roger were great but the original Purple were Ian Paice, Ritchie and Jon who I think are incredible and gave myself and David an opportunity and we took it.
“It`s a fight because some people want to hear the old songs, we do two old songs but apart from that it`s all new stuff and the majority of people reacted well. After only a few gigs I think it`s great!”
The European tour the band have just completed was to break in the new members; were the rest of the band worried about the replacements? “There wasn`t any bother about me because I had played a lot of American gigs but the biggest worry was David because he was taking Ian Gillan`s place.
“We`re singing together but he is taking his place on stage. Ian Gillan, as well as being great looking, had great feeling on the stage, that`s what they were worried about but he`s worked out all right.”

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KNOCKOUT

The band have just finished recording their new album “Burn” which proves to be an exciting recording. “It took ten days which is great, it was exciting to do; we used to spend all night playing. It was recorded in Montreux, Switzerland, and most of the cuts were done in two or three takes.
“I`m knocked out with the album, it sounds great when it`s loud. When we mixed it and then listened we were knocked out with it.”
I asked Glen how he rated the rest of the lads in the band. “I`ve always rated Ritchie for years, Ian Paice completely knocked me out when I saw him. Jon I`ve always admired as a musician, too, but when I saw him play I couldn`t hear him so I couldn`t feel what he was playing. But now I can hear him the stuff he plays is absolutely knockout especially on the album. I can`t describe working alongside him because he`s so precise he never makes a mistake.
“Ritchie`s the greatest improviser I`ve seen since Hendrix. He gets a bit pissed off because he knows he`s good but doesn`t go round telling everybody in print. It`s a bit sad when people go round saying Beck and Ronson are the best and nobody mentions Blackmore.”
Ever since Trapeze, Glen has always had soul influence. I asked him if the American tours had anything to do with this. “I think it was the way I was brought up really, because I missed out on all the Shadows, the rock and roll and was brought up with Tamla and soul and that`s how I was brought up to play.
“I left school when I was fifteen. I joined a little local band, called the News, playing lead guitar and it was a blues type band. Then I joined this band called Finders Keepers because I was broke and they needed a bass player and Mel (Galley) was in the band at the time. About nine months after we formed Trapeze.”
One thing which surprised me was the fact that Glen nearly joined the Electric Light Orchestra. Roy Wood asked me to join ELO before it was ever thought about. It was going to be Jeff, Roy, Bev and myself and some guys which they got eventually. I said yes, he asked me while The Move were still going, and in fact I left Trapeze, you know, did the big number, left the band very early on and I was rehearsing and living with Roy for two weeks. I then decided to go back to Trapeze.
“Although he was going to allow me to sing I think it would have been a bad move. He`s changed so many times he might have done something I wasn`t into and I would have been stuck.”
Something which Glen keeps on returning to is his split with Trapeze, clarifying his reason for leaving. “When I was with the band for three years I kept on saying `I`ll give it another year` and we did nine ten-week tours in America, that`s enough to break any band. The thing was in the States we didn`t have any agency and we couldn`t back any big bands so we were doing shit gigs all the time.
“It got us together musically but it screwed us up physically. I used to go to hospital to get shots, we were never big enough to cancel gigs.”
But although he`s had some rough experiences in the past Glen still holds a deep affection for the band. “I love that band,” he said, “I shall always want to be associated with them no matter what they do I`ll always want to jam with them `cause I love them.”

RIGOROUS

There were stories and rumours claiming that the old Deep Purple only saw each other when on stage, which is a far cry from the new band who have rigorous rehearsals and keep close contact. “We rehearsed three weeks in this castle on the Welsh borders every day and were always together. When I`m in London I stay at Ian`s.”
How had the band`s music changed in comparison to the old Purple? “They always wanted to play with a little bit more bluesy feel and now it makes you want to `shake your arse` and I think that`s why they changed their line up.”
One thing that`s pleased Glen no end is the fact that he`ll be partaking in solo projects as well. “I`m knocked out they`ve asked me to do my own album, which I`ll definitely do, but I`ll wait till people become more familiar with my name.”
He lay back in his chair and you could tell by the contented smile on his face that Glen was more excited than he let show. “I think everyone`s excited about this band, the album, the gigs. From the past few concerts I know people are coming to see the NEW Deep Purple and that`s great.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Denny Laine, Hughie Nicholson, Savoy Brown, Queen, Greenslade, Gary Glitter, Dave Lambert.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM SOUNDS, December 29, 1973

Out on the Deep Purple European Tour, that was an pre-tour for the release of their album “Burn”, Mr. Makowski was able to see the band in an very interesting period. They had just recorded their first album without two of their most famous members, Ian Gillan and Roger Glover, who were out of the band because of internal “conflicts”.
Now they had to find and introduce two new members that they hoped would be able to fill the giant shoes of the two were before them. Written before the release of their first album with Coverdale and Hughes, this was one of the first reports that fans of the band got of the new line up. I believe they felt a bit calmer after reading this report from Mr. Makowski.

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Purple are back, `nuff said?

Pete Makowski reports on their European tour

I was poundering many a question on leaving Heathrow Airport for Belgium to see the new look Deep Purple band who`ve recently acquired a vocalist and bass guitarist. Vocalists, like lead guitarists, are considered to be the focal point of most bands so the main question that arose was could Dave Coverdale take the floor where Ian Gillan had once stood with as much success? Glen Hughes – replacing Roger Glover – was playing bass and sharing vocals, how would he fair? Would the band die a death or receive their usual reception from droves of hard core fans?

BLEAK

Brussels proved as depressing and bleak a country as the one I`d just departed. The airport bus hostess called for our attention and informed that the vehicle was not working and that we`d have to walk across a barren runway plagued with gale force winds and heavy sleet.
On arrival at the band`s hotel it seemed that Purple were taking the chance of a sound test but at departure time they seemed calm enough, only Dave nervously anticipating the gig ahead and chewing his nails like a man awaiting the outcome of the 2.30 at Chepstow.
Glen Hughes confirmed that Purple had gone down extremely well in the earlier part of the tour as we filed into an awaiting fleet of sleek black limos – rock and roll`s adopted transport nowadays – to make our way to the gig.

LOONER

At the Forest National concert hall the band made their way down the long dark tunnel leading to the dressing rooms, passing a grey haired old lady collecting autographs and the usual lingerers hoping for a sight of their idols. A quick check with the roadies that everything was running according to schedule up front.
Inside the dressing rooms Jon Lord began tuning his mini Moog. Glen picked away on bass and from the next room came the thin rasping sound of Ritchie Blackmore`s guitar through the practice amp. Ian Paice wandered aimlessly around welcoming people with a rap on the head from his drumsticks. Like most drummers Ian is a genuine looner but has a great many interesting things to say about music too.
Dave Coverdale sat in the corner of the room and told me how pleased he`d been with the audience reactions to him and the `new` band in general. “There are only a few people who ask for the old numbers but they`re not abusive, they just make requests. They are also very critical, they don`t clap because it`s Purple.”
In front of stage my eyes gradually grew accustomed to the light and following the opening set by Tucky Buzzard I made out the shadowy figures of Purple on stage. As the spots lit up and the thunderous applause broke throughout the hall. Blackmore went straight into the chunky chords that intro “Burn”.
Wisps of dry ice filtered round the band`s feet as they joined Blackmore in building the strength of the number, this was the dawning of a new sound and concept for Purple and their music is certainly changing. They maintain that rugged energy element which has always been one of the band`s strengths, but the introduction of two new, enthusiastic members has injected a new vitality into the rest of Purple.

TRICKS

No one`s denying that Gillan and Glover were major forces in the old guard but they seemed to come to a standstill after “Machine Head” and it was generally known all was not quite right regarding the compatability of the band members.
Purple have developed a helluva lot more of what Ian Paice describes as `balls`, the two new members are better than I`d imagined and while I`d always admired Glen Hughes` work in Trapeze I didn`t expect the very funky feel he`s injected into the band.
Dave on the other hand still has a lot to learn about making use of the whole stage area and the tricks of handling a few thousand watts of PA. Dave admitted later: “I used to sing through a hundred watts of PA and now I`ve got God knows how many watts. It`s hard for me to put all my feeling into it but that`ll come in time, the rest of the lads are so bloody good when they`re soloing I find myself standing there in amazement.”

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TASTEFUL

Like Glen, Dave also has a love for soul music and an extremely powerful voice with a lot of depth and guts. By the time Purple reach Britain, Coverdale will be able to prove his virtuosity as a singer and performer and he`s already acquired a great number of European fans.
Back on stage the new numbers are so tight they have to be seen to be believed. Purple played a lot of material from their new album, a recording that will make up for a lot of disappointments on their “Who Do They Think They Are” album. Ritchie has always been acclaimed as a technical player but never as one with enough feel but that`s another thing that can be dismissed.
He comes over as a very tasteful blues guitarist and this is highlighted in a tasty number titled “Mistreated” with all the emotion and feel you want. As a showman he can`t be faulted either, contorting his body to those bent guitar notes, raising his arm high in the air and watching the band out of the corner of his eye to see that everything`s working perfectly.
More crowd eruptions when Jon Lord announced they were going to do one of Purple`s old numbers: “It was written in 1736, hope you like it.” A pregnant silence and then Ritchie delicately plays a flurry of notes that lead into the instantly recognisable chords of “Smoke On The Water”.
Glen and Dave shared the vocals – a very powerful combination – and Paice played a very energetic drum solo featuring some good phasing through the right and left hand bank of on stage speakers.
The set culminated with “Highway Star”, a stunning climax featuring solos from each of the band, Glen constantly strutting back and forth, flicking his long mane of hair back out of his eyes and playing solid, mean bass with a wah wah attachment.
Jon Lord followed with some skillful switching from mini Moog to electric piano and Blackmore put the final seal on the gig by hurling his Stratocaster into the air, catching it a split second before it hit the stage, dry ice swirled again and it was only seconds before they were into the inevitable encore.

EXCITING

Saturday, Frankfurt: It was a particularly hard day for Purple`s road crew, the gear had arrived late and no transport from the airport to the next venue was available. It had been one of those troublesome tours according to Magnet, one of the band`s roadies.
This concert was to be held at the vast Festerhaller which was about five times the size of the previous night`s gig, this (Germany) is Deep Purple country and the gig proved everything it should have, both musically and visually exciting.
But Ian Paice was slightly disappointed with the gig: “The excitement was there but the music wasn`t that together. No one has seen the real potential of this band, I think we`ll be bigger than we`ve been before.” Hot words but Ian`s been in the band to know what`s cooking.

WATCHES

After the concert German EMI held a reception for the band who were presented with engraved gold watches for the sales of “Made In Japan”, “It`s a bit embarrasing receiving a gift for something you didn`t play on” admitted Glen. The reception also marked the band`s release of a double compilation “Mark 1 & 2”. The material includes a beautifully arranged version of the Beatles` “Help”.
As I left Purple they were heading for Munich for a well earned day off, pleased that they`ve been readily accepted with the new guys and I can understand why. This change in personnel has given Purple a complete new lease of life and should leave them safely nestled in the top bracket of rock bands for a good while yet.
Let`s just say Purple are back. Nuff said?

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At the time when mushroom and bumble bee motifs were “de rigeur”.

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Leo Sayer, The Who, Gallagher&Lyle, Keith Emerson, Beck, Bogert & Appice, Magma.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.