Humble Pie

ARTICLE ABOUT Humble Pie FROM SOUNDS, January 8, 1972

This band had more chart success after Frampton left the band and he had more success without this band, so it turned out well for them after all. One of the greatest English rock drummers also get a mention in this article.
Have a good read!

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Adding a little blues to the Pie

By Ray Telford

Humble Pie are now a band of some stature in Britain. Of course it took the super-aware American audiences to pick up on them first and start giving them the kind of respect any band needs for a healthy growth but that has seemed to be the way with most of the best of our home-grown rock bands – The Grease Band and Procol Harum being two of the more obvious examples.
Humble Pie returned from their umpteenth American tour a month before Christmas. That had been their first bunch of dates with new guitarist Dave Clempson since he took over from the talented and still under-rated Pete Frampton. In his last few months with Humble Pie, Frampton became aware of an ever increasing alienation between himself and the music he was obliged to play.
Clempson tells a similar story. Over two years he`d become some kind of guitar sensation with Colosseum but he too felt he was being drawn into musical directions which were not his cup of tea. There`s little doubt that Clempson`s departure from Colosseum did a lot to break up the band generally. Also they were a group largely out of place, sad as it may be, among contemporary British and American rock bands and I have little hesitation in guessing that this alone did much to speed up the Colosseum split.

Dave, however, has no such high flown theories. He simply speaks for himself when he says: “Before joining Colosseum I was just a happy little guitarist playing what I liked best but with Colosseum there was always something to live up to. The whole band were always consciously trying to knock people out and in the end that was what was beginning to screw me up.”
Nevertheless, it would have taken a shrewd observer indeed to predict a year ago that an instrumentalist like Clempson would one day find a home in a hard grooving band like Humble Pie. Dave hadn`t heard much of them until joining, apart from a few radio spots and a small tour of Germany they did with Colosseum two years ago. What he did hear, though, Dave liked.
Although he never had the chance to play a lot of blues in the past couple of years, Dave reckons he`ll now be able to make up for lost time.
“I`ve always thought of myself as a blues player and all the people in the band want me to play the blues and this is one reason why I`m much happier. With this band there`s no obsession about being better than anyone else which was what was happening in Colosseum. The guys in Humble Pie maybe aren`t the best at what they`re doing but we feel it and enjoy it and it just feels really natural.

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“You know, Greg (bassist Greg Ridley) is much the same as I am. He`s very paranoid about his playing. He wants me to teach him more about the technical things in music because right now he feels he needs it. He`s got amazing feel, a real natural feel, but he wants to know more about what he`s actually playing. Bass players like Jack Bruce are perfect because he has this feel born in him and he`s got a ridiculous technique.”
Taking into account his previous dissatisfaction, or even disillusionment with Colosseum, I put it to Dave that forming his own band would have been an ideal solution. He says it was a thought which he had toyed with and had even gone so far as suggesting the idea to one of his old friends from his days in Birmingham, drummer Cozy Powell, who now sits in the drum chair of the Jeff Beck Group.
“Someday I`m going to be in a band with Cozy,” Dave said determinedly. “When my first band (a useful blues band called Bakerloo) broke up I was going to get a band started with Dave Pegg and Cozy in Birmingham but then Dave joined Fairport Convention and I went to Colosseum and Cozy was also involved in a few things so it never came off. But I did think quite a lot about getting my own thing started a few times while I was with Colosseum.”
Naturally Dave`s link up with Pie presented problems but again he points out that they were things which only needed a little time to put right. He says joining was easy because they were playing the music he felt and knew best. Instrumentally, his biggest hangup was getting the hang of knowing how much to play and how much to leave out.

Dave admits to being somewhat apprehensive, though, about his replacing Pete Frampton, if not from a musical viewpoint, certainly on a personality basis. Especially in the States Frampton was much loved. Dave was worried about group images and wondered, needlessly as it turned out, if an ex-member of Colosseum was acceptable to Humble Pie audiences. The two guitar styles varied greatly but each fitted. However, the past American tour proved that audiences or appreciation had not dwindled over the departure of Frampton.
“When Pete left the band they wanted somebody who had a different style and not somebody who was going to be purely a replacement for Pete. Rick Derringer really wanted the job desperately but he played too much like Pete. They needed somebody too who could fit in along with Steve`s (Marriott) singing and rhythm guitar playing.”
Humble Pie are in the studios for the greater part of January recording their fourth album. It`ll be the first time Dave will have recorded with the band. He`s proved himself on gigs the forthcoming album will be his final test.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Sandy Denny, Mimi Farina, Josè Feliciano, T. Rex, Crowbar, Muggsy Spanier, Canned Heat, Eric Clapton, Teddy Osei, Georgie Fame, Rolling Stones.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

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ARTICLE ABOUT Humble Pie FROM SOUNDS, JULY 3, 1971

Here is a band that most have heard the name of, but still may not know their music. One of the bands forgotten by the tick-tocking of time, effectively ending their career in 1975 and then releasing two albums at the start of the 80s as a final “hurrah”.
The original members of this band all played in several bands, many of them known at least at the level of Humble Pie or more. Everyone knows Peter Frampton after his famous solo live album “Comes Alive”, but Steve Marriott should be a familiar name for most, not at least through his time playing for Small Faces.
At the time of this interview their greatest success as a band were still waiting just around the corner. In 1972 and 1973 they charted both in the UK and the US with the albums “Smokin`” and “Eat It”.

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A Humble offering of rock `n` roll

By Royston Eldridge

Humble Pie have made it but they haven`t had it easy. They`ve done it the hard way by spending months working around America, living down that initial supergroup ballyhoo that they never really wanted, until now when they`ve reached the stage where they`re accepted as a rock and roll band in their own right.
And that`s really all they`ve ever wanted. “I can`t kid myself,” Steve Marriott says, “I`m an old rock and roller, I`ll never be anything else, I`ve never wanted to be anything else.” Peter Frampton thinks the same way too and both of them have always wanted a group to play in where they`ll be known as musicians and not pretty faces.
“We`ve done a few clubs in England, the Marquee and things like that, and we also did one Locarno which we decided we`d never do again after being screamed at. We`ve never wanted that; all we`ve wanted to do is just to lay some rock and roll on the audience and try and bring a little bit of excitement back. It`s been a bit dull, don`t you think?”
So far all the excitement that Humble Pie have created has been in America where they`ve worked their way up from supporting act to headliners. A switch which happened in one week in New York. “We played the Fillmore with Cactus and the next week they asked us both back and the next time we headlined over Cactus. It was a really good gig,” Frampton explains.

SCRATCH

In England progress has been slower but then Humble Pie haven`t played here that much. “When we first started we did a concert tour in England on the strength of the hit single and people weren`t really sure of us, they didn`t know whether we were going to be a teenybopper group or whatever. They weren`t too sure of our past reputations.
So we just decided to do America first, somewhere to go to where they had no pre-conceived idea of what we are, and we started from scratch there. I mean they knew Greg from Spooky Tooth and they knew Steve had come from the Small Faces but they didn`t really know Jerry or myself. I was known just about from the Herd because we were always meant to be going over but we never really made it.
“Now we`ve spent like nine months slowly building up a reputation in America and we`ve got a reputation as a good band now. It`s taken us some time, sure, the last tour was three months long, but we`d made up our minds to stay until the album got into the charts and it has done. It didn`t get as high as we`d have liked it to but it made it.” Frampton spoke from Frankfurt where he, Marriott, Greg Ridley and Jerry Shirley were in the middle of a European tour.
The Piemen return on Friday for Saturday`s Hyde Park concert with Grand Funk Railroad, a group that Humble Pie have played with a lot in the States. “We`ve done some really big arenas with Grand Funk and it was good for us because we`re able to reach so many people in a short space of time. Like at Madison Square Garden and St. Louis you`re playing to 20,000 at a time and then we`re playing Shea Stadium with them in July.

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RECORDS

During their last American tour, Humble Pie recorded at the Fillmore East and they hope to have a live album and their next single out of what was put down on tape at what Frampton describes as a “really good” gig.
“We did it about three weeks, it was the last gig we did and it was really good. We`ve got to mix it again, we`ve mixed it once, but we`re going to take the tapes to America with us when we go over to play Shea Stadium.
“The single will probably be `I Don`t Need No Doctor` which is a number that Ray Charles does very well. And the album will probably be a double album and that`ll be out in September. The single should be out at the end of July.
“The album will have the whole of the stage act on it and even some of the numbers that we don`t do every time. There`ll be some of our real favourites like `Rolling Stone` which is the Muddy Waters number, `Gilded Splinters` and `Four Day Creep` which is normally our opening number.”

CLOSE-DOWN

Hyde Park apart, Humble Pie aren`t likely to be playing England again until late autumn. After their next American tour they plan to return to Europe for a two-week round of appearances and then come back to England although Frampton feels there aren`t many good venues left.
“There seems to be something of a close down. When I was there I got the feeling that there was no excitement anymore, they`ve closed down Mothers in Birmingham which was a good gig, like doing the Marquee, but there`s not much else especially outside of London unless you do a concert tour. There`s Birmingham Town Hall, there`s a few other town halls, but there`s nothing like the Lyceum and you can`t keep playing London.”
America then remains of major importance to Humble Pie although they`d like, in Frampton`s words, to lay some rock and roll on English audiences. America has accepted them, England remains to be conquered.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Traffic, Bronco, Yes, Kate Taylor, Gary Burton, Tony Williams, Stephen Stills, Murray Head, Sandy Denny, John Sebastian, Clouds, Heads & Hands and Feet, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blood, Sweat & Tears, Curtis Mayfield, Scotty.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.