Slade

ARTICLE ABOUT Slade FROM SOUNDS, April 26, 1975

No doubt that Mr. Holt had the time of his life watching Slade!
Read on.

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Slade – Kings of rock

Concert review by Phil Holt

Slade`s shows have an atmosphere all of their own, and the nearest comparison is that of a football match. The fans bring along their scarves, rosettes, top hats and either chant impatiently for their heroes to emerge or just simply sing Super Slade. Then, when the set gets underway, we have singing, shouting, stomping, swaying, choruses of `You`ll Never Walk Alone`, all led by the Kop cheerleader-in-chief, Noddy Holder. The control he exerts over the crowd is amazing and as successful as ever – he keeps the mood light and good natured with not a hint of aggro anywhere. Perhaps Noddy should be Tommy Doc`s next signing.
The music itself fits neatly into this package storming along at a vast rate of knots and containing the simple but effective hookline – either a riff or via the lyrics – that have made Slade the undisputed kings of commercial rock.
All the old favourites were there `Goodbye To Jane`, `Bangin` Man`, `Every Day`, plus a couple from the film, plus a couple of new numbers that fit into the Slade vein perfectly. The act itself was carefully structured with pedestals for Jimmy Lea and Dave Hill to mount and ramps extending into the audience.
But any doubts that may have existed about everything being too arranged was shattered by the spontaneous energy of Slade`s finale. This was a complete rock segment starting with `Let The Good Times Roll` and finishing with`Get Down And Get With It` that shook the Birmingham Odeon to its foundations. So Slade finished with a reception that they will find hard to equal anywhere in this country, never mind America.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frank Zappa, Gladys Knight, Women In Rock, Betty Wright, Steve Harley, Peter Frampton, Labelle, Peter Skellern, Ray Davies, Larry Uttal, Chris Spedding, Anne Murray, Sweet Sensation, Bernard Purdie, Mike Harding, Ronnie Lane, Yes.
The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.
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ARTICLE ABOUT Slade FROM SOUNDS, October 19, 1974

Here is a nice one with the drummer in Slade, Mr. Don Powell. Hope you like it!

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Slade: the final challenge

Yet another round of London hotel interviews for Slade. They must have stayed in (and subsequently been banned from – through no fault of their own) almost every hotel in town. It`s just as well they keep building new ones. This time Slade are here to finish off their “Flame” movie and to see the rough version of the finished film. Bill Henderson spoke to drummer Don Powell.

Slade interviews rarely produce much in the way of controversy – a bit of chat, a few laughs, reiterations of the Slade manifesto.
Basically, there`s never a lot new to speak about. Another hit single another hit album, another sell out tour of Britain, of Europe, of Australia and Japan. There isn`t a lot of contention there. The only sore point that ever arises is America, and the group`s relative lack of success there. And that is always dealt with the standard statement of intent (which I`ll return to later).
Now, at least there`s something different in the pipeline – a film. But even that could hardly be described as a variation from the norm of pop star progress from Bing Crosby/Frank Sinatra onwards. But at least it`s something new to talk about.
The film is about a group called Flame, as you probably know. The story of Flame is basically the story of Slade with a little scriptwriter`s licence.
“The writer, Andrew Birkin, and the director travelled with us during our last States tour, talked with us about our early days and wrote the story line basically around that,” explained Don. “They got to know us individually and wrote our characters to the parts.
“The worst part was wondering how the real actors were going to take to us but it was incredible. It was a bit strange at first but they helped us along.”
So basically it`s the story of Slade with the lads playing themselves. It`s not strictly a comedy but, as you might imagine, adlib Slade humour does surface throughout. We should be seeing it early in the New Year, perhaps even in time for Christmas.

And of course there`s an accompanying soundtrack album, recorded two weeks before the film:
“We knew the basic storyline of the film so Nod and Jim wrote the songs to fit. We didn`t have any free time so they had to write it on our last American tour and then we rehearsed them as we went along – getting to the halls earlier and in hotel rooms and things. Then we spent like two weeks solid in the studio putting it together.”
The diversification of the Slade sound that has been apparent over the last album and recent singles will continue. This time they use brass.
“It`s the first time we ever used anything outside the group before, it was really strange having other guys in the studio and then listening back to it afterwards. We sound like a real group! We used the brass – Georgie Fame`s horn section – to augment a few things. And Nod and Jim`s writing is getting a lot better, trying to be a bit more experimental now.”
Chas Chandler is mixing the album in New York at the moment, then when the “odds and sods” are completed for the film, Slade begin yet another tour. This time of Europe, starting in…. Iceland. To be followed by a tour of America in the New Year. (Nothing planned for Britain at this stage).
But America, the cloud on the Slade horizon, the only blot on their success escutcheon, Through steady touring they`ve got to the stage where they sell out wherever they play but their records still don`t mean a light. Discouraged, Don?
“No, not at all. I mean, we`re actually getting to like working there now. When we first went we didn`t like the country – we liked working there but we didn`t like being there, until lately.”
America is the challenge, perhaps the only challenge they`ve got left. Their records still seem to fall between the AM and FM radio stools, in spite of the change in the Slade sound. The Slade answer to the dilemma as ever seems to keep on plugging away until America capitulates.

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“We really need to work there a long time, we haven`t worked there very much really. It`s a weird place, it`s so big. We`ll be spending quite a lot of time over there in the New Year.”
But after all, touring is the only way Slade know. It`s their prime motivation.
“We`re the kind of group that it`s hard for us not to work, to actually tour `cause we get bored if we don`t. I mean, it`s great to have some time off when we`ve finished but it`s great to get back. That`s the big kick we get, doing one-nighters.
“Making records is OK but you can`t beat being on stage. I like working in the studio but it gets kind of  mechanical. Studio work has gotta be done obviously but I don`t like going in for one or two days as we usually have to do. I like to work up and do what we gotta do and get back to the stage again.
“Even travelling I like, although we never get time to see anywhere. We spent some time in New Orleans last time – an amazing place, so unlike America. I couldn`t believe it: the hotel we were staying in, the Platters were playing downstairs in the bar, Clarence Frogman Henry was next door and somebody else next door again. And they`re the originals – not like what you get here at the Top Ranks!”
But in spite of Slade`s uncompromising attitude to America, playing there has changed them.
“We play longer and different numbers in America than in England. They want to hear the hits here, obviously you don`t get that in America.
“We went over there completely unknown – and we still are basically – so we tried new things and also got back to how we used to be in the early days, trying out new things and playing longer.”
Ah yes, the old days. Nostalgia.

“Last time in the States we managed to drive between some cities which was better. I think back to the old days of travelling in the van, stopping off at a tranny caff in the middle of the night for greasy bacon sandwiches and a big mug of tea – with no saucers!” (A reference to the genteel hotel crockery.)
“Back in Wolverhampton we still knock around with the old gang, always bringing up about the old days when we used to play the pubs and were always told to turn down. We still use those pubs and Wolverhampton`s still basically the same, the same groups playing.”
Roots is what you call it, I suppose. Slade still live in Wolverhampton, still aren`t quite used to the big city. And it`s the awareness of these roots that makes Slade a genuine “people`s band”, that chatting to them doesn`t bring out much in the way of profundities but is more like speaking to the guy next door and what keeps them touring with no urge to do anything else. Playing live like they always have, like they always will.
Speaking of the current scene, Don spoke of his liking for the Sparks and Bad Company records but that he would prefer to see them on stage. He likes 10cc and having worked with them in America has seen them live – the only time Slade ever get to see anybody: “Personally I`ve got that thing of seeing people live before making comments about them.”
The only way he knows how. When I asked him what innovations he might like to introduce to the band`s sound, the reply was entirely fitting: “Personally I like to use an old kit with pigskin heads to get back to that old, earthy sound.”
Which sums it up pretty well.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Humble Pie, Stephen Stills, Robin Trower, Big John Vary, Aj Webber, Rolling Stones, Syreeta Wright, Wishbone Ash, Mike McGear, Bert Jansch, Rufus, Minnie Riperton, John Coghlan, Bob Henrit.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Slade FROM SOUNDS, March 3, 1973

I think there may be a lesson or two when it comes to songwriting in this one. Many bands have been tempted to shake things up a bit in their career and do something else than they usually do musically. Quite often they fail, if not musically, so at least among their fans. Never change a winning team, they say, and in many ways this is very true for musical artists with one or two exceptions. Most should follow Slade`s lead on this one.
Until next time… have a good read!

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Now`s the time for Slade

By Steve Peacock

“There`s a line in it that says `So you think my singing`s out of time, well it makes me money,`” says Noddy Holder, pausing to take in the effect of his words. And then he laughs.
`It` is “Cum On, Feel The Noize”, Slade`s new single, and is the reason that they were sitting around in a small dressing room at BBC TV centre last week, waiting for the technicians of Top Of The Pops to sort out some problems with Olivia Newton-John and the orchestra before the programme`s run-through started.
around showing off his Australian sun-tan – “actually it pissed with rain half the time we were over there” – and the anecdotes were flowing free. (This text started like this in the paper – not a mistake – Blog ed.)
A man from Scene and Heard bustles in clutching a tape recorder and asks them to do a quick trailer or two for the programme. Noddy shouts one into the mike – “This is Noddy Holder from Slade, we want you to listen to Scene and Heard because we listen to Scene and Heard, all right (crescendo) awrightawrightawrightawright! Keep On Rocking!” – and then he, Dave and Jimmy make up a couple of ditties based on Slade singles and bellow them into the mike with Nod strumming on acoustic.

TARTAN

They get a call that they`re on soon, and as Nod dons striped socks, tartan trews, tartan waistcoat and top hat to match. Dave disappears into the washroom to deck himself out in his latest creation. There`s a sudden hush as he re-appears, and the whole room dissolves in hysterics: he`s wearing a long black robe with mirrors stuck all over it, silver trousers underneath, and a kind of wire mesh headdress, silver, with more mirrors, that fastens under his chin. He looks like a Busby Berkely nun, and when someone stops laughing long enough to say he ought to be auditioning for a part in “The Sound Of Music”, he looks mock-hurt: “I was trying to look like Cleopatra.”
Listen he says as the helpless cackling starts to die away, “You write `em, I`ll sell `em.” A chorus of groans and “You`ve used that one before,” greets that one, and they`re off down the corridor into the cavenous studio for the run-through.
Watching on the monitors, it`s quickly apparent that the cameras can`t handle the reflected glare from all Dave`s mirrors – every time they turn on him the screen fills with dazzle. Back to the dressing room, manager Chas Chandler says he`ll have to strip it down a bit, and Dave looks suitably distressed.

ROCKING

There can be no doubt these days that Slade are stomping right to the top of the heap – a tight, exciting, fun rock band who`ve got the business of hit-singling, hit-albuming and sell-out concerting down to a fine art. They`re not breaking any frontiers of music, and they don`t much want to, but they`re rocking on, having a great time, and honing themselves up into one of the tightest and most expert rock bands we`ve ever had.
“The new single,” says Nod, “was made in much the same way as all the others – we went for a good commercial sound, and what we tried to get was something with a good singalong chorus. It`s got a lot more chords in it than we usually use – you can actually play it on Spanish guitars and it sounds just as good – and a strong melody, and I think it`s very easily remembered. It goes back to something we used to do a lot in a way, because we tried to use a lot of ringing chords, play them high up on the neck with a lot of open strings so they ring out.”
At its basic approach, “Cum On Feel The Noize” is quite obviously well in the traditional Slade mould, and they`re happy about that: “You can`t escape certain aspects of our singles,” says Dave. “I mean this one is very obviously Slade, and I don`t think you have to make a direct difference in your approach just because it`s your next single. You`ve got to keep it well within the vein of what`s being enjoyed nowadays, which is to get up and sing and really get on with it.”
Which is what they do, and the combination of enjoying what they`re doing at the moment and being successful with it, gives them little incentive to think about drastically changing their music. Though they hurry to point out that they`re not being complacent.

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“We are progressing in many ways,” says Nod, “we`re getting better on stage, and in the studio we`re getting more relaxed and beginning to understand the techniques of recording better, and I think we`re writing better songs all the time. We don`t feel the style is getting worn at all, we just want to make it better all the time, adding ideas, and seeing what comes out of it all; what changes are coming will come gradually.”
As a guitarist, did Dave ever feel he needed more space to stretch himself? “No,” he said emphatically. “I think what I do inside the numbers is right at the moment. There are a lot of things I could do if I wanted to be a clever dick, but I think it would be pretty pointless.”
Nod: “The whole band works towards the vocals and the melody, and if anything cuts across that we scotch it. What we try to do at the moment is to make everything in the band complement the melody and the vocals – we don`t have to try to blow each other off or anything.”
Dave: “We haven`t got to prove anything to each other, we know exactly what we`re doing and what we can do.”
Nod: “We were listening to our very first album `Play It Loud` the other day, and the arrangements on it… just nothing complemented anything else. What we`ve been doing is simplifying everything down, so that you`ve got the bass and the drums keeping the rhythm going, and a strong melody, and then anything else you put in is really the icing on the cake.

“There are lots of things we can still use – like the violin, we`ve only used that on `Coz I Luv You` so far, so, we`ve got that to use still, and there`s vocal harmony which we used to do a lot, but we haven`t used much for a while. So we`ve got plenty of things still in the can that we can draw on.
“People in the business keep saying we ought to change soon because people will get sick of us, but the fact is that people aren`t getting sick of us – we`re selling more records every time we bring one out. The `Slayed` album sold as many in two weeks as `Slade Alive` did in nine months that it was in the charts, so things like that prove to us that we`re going the right way.”
What would happen if it came to a time when – as has happened to so many other groups – Slade wanted to change their music, but the record-buying people wanted them to keep on bashing out the same old story? “You mean if I wasn`t happy playing but people still enjoyed it? I don`t think that point will ever come. I`m happy playing at the moment, but if it ever did… well, we`d have to cross that bridge when we came to it. But I don`t think we`d ever get to the stage where we`d go on and play things we didn`t like just because other people like them.”
And remember, that cuts both ways.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Darryl Way (Curved Air), Sounds staff analyse David Bowie, Nazareth, Steve Marriott, Average White Band, Elton John, Geordie, Status Quo, Thin Lizzy, Stackridge,  Peter Gabriel, Mike Heron, Jesse Winchester.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Slade FROM SOUNDS, November 25, 1972

A nice album review from one of the most popular rock bands ever coming from the UK. Enjoy!

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Album review:

Slade: “Slayed?”
(Polydor 2383 163).

By Billy Walker

You can`t help but luv dear ol` Slade for just being themselves, no frills, just down to earth rock and rollers in it for the birds, booze, money and love of it all. They make good music, despite those who feel they`re just a good show and nothing else, and “Slayed?” has everything you`d expect; very few surprises but music that`ll get you up and jumpin` if you`re within a four to seventy four year old age group. “How Do You Ride” gets the boys off and kicking with a great Stones feel to the opening which rolls along within the number, Jimmy Lea gets some barrell house piano going in “The Whole World`s Goin` Crazee”, which is another great rock and roller, and the most obvious thing about the album is proof that Dave Hill`s a far better guitarist than you`d imagine and that Lea, along with Noddy Holder, writes some surprising lyrics. “Look At Last Nite”, “I Won`t Let It `Appen Agen” show this aspect of the band, but it`s numbers like Janis Joplin`s “Move Over”, played with complete confidence and understanding, and “Gudbuy T`Jane” that show what Slade`s about, their toughness and drive with “Jane” keeping up the very high standard of single releases they`ve set. “Mama Weer All Crazee Now” is included and “Gudbuy Gudbuy” flashes in like something from the Beatles` “Magical Mystery Tour” and then settles into a more Sladish theme, although Nod`s vocals here sound remarkably like John Lennon. No messin` from the boys here, a real nice rocker from Nod, Dave, Jimmy and Don. Long liv Slade.

Slade

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frankie Miller, Wishbone Ash, Steve Took, Edgar Broughton, Rod Stewart, Don McLean, Harry Chapin, Hookfoot, Lou Reizner, Allman Brothers, The organisers of the Isle of Wight Festival, Roy Harper, Gladys Knight, Tight Like That, Gentle Giant.

This issue is sold!

ARTICLE ABOUT Slade FROM SOUNDS, October 7, 1972

A strange phenomenon sometimes occur in the music business when a band who is very successful in their home country don`t “make it” in another country, even if their language, culture and shared history is the same. This is the story of Slade trying to crack America in a tale that countless other bands have experienced through the years. Slade did very well for themselves in Europe, but it is still a mystery why they never achieved the same levels of success in the US.

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Just a spot of homely vulgarity

Noddy Holder talking to Steve Peacock

Well, they had to drop the knickers out of the show, but a bit of good old Wolverhampton vulgarity didn`t come amiss in New York.
“We had this press conference in New York,” said Noddy, the day after Slade got back from their first States tour, “and all these underground press people were there asking all these really mad questions. All they wanted to know about was our dope and sex habits, what sort of creams do we use, that sort of question.”
So what did they do? “Told them. They weren`t expecting that I don`t think, but we can be just as vulgar as them any day, so we were. The press conference got really well debased after that, it was great fun.”

HARDER

After holding off from the States for a long time, for as long as it took them to achieve a string of hit singles and a solid on-stage reputation in this country, Slade had decided the time was right for them to go and start telling American audiences to Get Down And Get With It. It seems to have worked.
Their tour was opening the show for the likes of Humble Pie, J. Geils, and Boz Scraggs, and from all accounts – Noddy`s included – the audiences sat up and were interested.
“We had to work just like we did in England about a year ago – had to really work on them to get them interested and show them what we were all about. Opening the show, of course, we only had about 30 minutes, so it was a bit different, we had to change the act around a lot, cut out a lot of the humour, and make the music a lot harder.

HASSLE

“But the whole thing worked just like we hoped it would, and like we expected it to. Pie were bringing in the sort of audience who were likely to dig us anyway, so that was no problem, and they followed the instructions – right, they got up on their feet and danced. The only hassle we had was with the cops really – every time people got up to dance they pushed them back in their seats again. That was bad.”
Slade`s onslaught on the States seems to have been run as efficiently and cleverly as most of their operations. They picked the right time, the right tour, and – it seems – the right way of working.
Cutting the act down to 30 minutes, they wisely cut out a lot of the chat – “we had to leave out a lot of the humour thing anyway; some of it they could take, but some of it they couldn`t understand at all. The knickers thing for instance, that didn`t go over well at all” – and left in a set that ran “Hear Me Calling”, “Move over Baby”, “Darlin` Be Home Soon”, “Keep On Rocking”, “Tak Me Bak Ome”, and “Get Down And Get With It”.
If there was an encore it was “Mama Weer All Crazee Now”. If you`ve ever seen Slade on stage, you`ll know that would be a pretty impressive burst of rocking, especially from an opening act.

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They got the audiences going: “Promoters and people were telling us they don`t often see a band, especially a bottom of the bill band, go on stage with the attitude we do, wearing all the clothes and the make-up and stuff, and make such a good impression with the audiences. It was just working hard that did it I think – they were surprised.
“But I think it`s improved the band an awful lot too. In Europe it was getting to the point where the act was getting more important than the music, but America really tightened us up. People over here seemed to want all the act stuff so we were getting more and more into that, but in America they really wanted the music so we had to work hard on that, detail it out.
“The audiences over there seemed to be much more interested in the songs than they are over here, they really wanted to get into what we did as well as get up and rave. We did two shows in a lot of the places, and you`d get a lot of young kids coming to the early house, but mostly older people at the second one. That was a lot harder, because they were usually pretty stoned – it was hard getting over to them.”
But whatever the local difficulties, the tour seems to have set Slade well on the way to establishing themselves in the States. Just as they were leaving for home, “Slade Alive”, the album, and their single over there “Tak Me Bak Ome”, had both started into the chart. From here, they have to finish their studio album, do a European tour, then a British tour, and then back to the States, in the new year.

WINNING

The change has been refreshing in a way – as they predicted, it was like starting again. “The nice thing about it is that I think everyone steps into the States with an equal chance. Like people had heard a bit about what we`d been doing over here, but I think you really have to prove yourselves, to the audiences and to the press. They want to see for themselves.”
Did that apply to T. Rex as well, did he think. “I think it does. Nobody really asked us much about them or seemed to think they were much different from any other band going over there and trying to crack it.”
How did he feel it was going, comparatively?
“I think we`re winning.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dan Hicks, Home, Tom Paxton, Camel, Dave Davies, Chick Corea, Mott The Hoople, Jimi Hendrix, Stackridge, Alan Hull, Lindisfarne, Danny Seiwell, Natural Acoustic Band, Dando Shaft.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.