The Who

ARTICLE ABOUT The Who FROM SOUNDS, July 20, 1974

When it comes to Rock Operas, it is difficult not to the mention the Who. Due to their success with those, they became a very visual band and that led them into the world of film. Here is a report from the set of “Tommy”.

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Jolly Roger

Penny Valentine meets the most expensive prop any film ever had, Roger Daltrey.

In about an hour`s time Roger Daltrey, attired in nothing more protective than a loin cloth that closely resembles a baby`s nappy, will be pinned inside a silver iron maiden and have over 100 butterflies crawling and fluttering all over him.
Right now it`s lunch break on the set of “Tommy”, Ken Russell`s latest extravaganza, and Daltrey – the man who humbly calls himself “the most expensive prop any film ever had” – is incongerously merry in his dressing room at the Ladbroke Grove film studios.
There aren`t too many people that, faced with the prospect of “things” crawling all over their bodies could lash into a steak with as much relish as Daltrey is now, or indeed be laughing about it at all. But then filming the Who`s prodigious musical under Russell`s extraordinary visual eye has, as I find out, been an excellent lesson in survival. Man against cameras and effects. Almost a film within a film.
It is not surprising that people report tales of Daltrey`s explosion three days into filming, when he turned round to those nearest and cried in desperation: “This is the first and bloody last film I make”. Russell likes his stars to come hardy.
First there was the saga of the filthy pond water being hosed all over Roger, complete, as it transpires, with the fish that were harmlessly lying on the pond bottom.

Then there was the moment when Daltrey was thrown on set as part of the action and unfortunately missed the mattress that was supposed to break his fall. The result of this was that Daltrey had concussion and was unconcious for seven minutes. At the end of which time our hero came round to feebly enquire: “Did you get that take, Ken?”.
The fact that Roger now boasts absolutely no hair on one arm shouldn`t worry anyone either. Just a little incident, I hear, of walking through banks of flames in a thin T-shirt.
Of course the rest of the set and crew were wrapped up in asbestos suits at the time. And Daltrey did weakly mutter, “I think I`m burning, Ken” before going into what he described as a “yoga like trance and oddly dancing over the broken glass and through the heat not feeling a thing”.
When you hear all that, and think that there`s only three of the fifteen weeks filming to go, perhaps it`s a little easier to understand why the prospect of being locked in with butterflies for a couple of days should hold no worries for Daltrey.
He`s really enjoying the process of filming – the novelty of it, the professionalism, the ability to create the role in yet another way. And he does look shatteringly well, tanned boot polish brown from the filming at “Tommy`s holiday camp”. He`s happy too that Russell is pleased with the way things are going and confident enough to offer him the starring role in his next epic on composer Franz Liszt. Certainly things couldn`t be going better for Roger Daltrey ex-sheet metal worker.

But like everything in life Daltrey`s glee is not 100 per cent infallible. Over lunch it`s apparent that all is not as well as it would appear and rumours that the Who are coming close to their millionth reported break-up is obviously having its usual effect.
For the last two years Daltrey has had this somewhat frantic desire to keep everything going at top rate all at once – of being offered chances he couldn`t turn down, but only doing them when it suited the band he clings on to like a lover. He has always jealously advocated the group`s right to be bigger and better than they`ve ever been. And it has always been Roger that has somehow tried to use the things he`s been offered outside the group to give them a kick into action when things looked like they were getting too quiet.
Today it`s questions about the next film – due to start in January – and maybe the recording of his own second solo album that seems to suddenly bring things to the fore. The fact that the progress of the Who has always been Roger`s biggest worry is not helped by the current rumours that Moon wants to go and live in America, and that Pete can`t decide whether he wants to keep going out on the road. And Daltrey really does need the Who more than maybe anyone realises. To him the band has always been his security, his jumping off board. To make films and solo albums – a rewarding and ego boosting experience though it may be – has really always taken second place to the band and the three guys in it.
The frustration at the situation right now is easy to see in Daltrey`s eyes. The fact that it`s something that has become harder to sort out privately but has to be done in the constant glare of public attention only makes the situation worse.
“Bloody news stories”, he suddenly says pushing away the half eaten steak. “Stupid bloody news stories. As far as the papers are concerned the Who have bloody well been breaking up since the day they formed. And this situation now – well it`s the same one that was going on last year. It`s just that we`re going through a difficult period. It`s not down to breaking up. Everytime the Who are a bit quiet that starts. But it`s not. It`s down to – where do we go from here?”

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And where DO they go from here?
“I think we`ve got to start thinking bigger than we have done. I think we`re going to do a TV special after this film – because once this film comes out believe me it`s going to make us important. I mean it`ll be bloody lunacy for the Who.
“But right now we need to go and record another album. A Who rock and roll album. “Quadrophenia” got blown out of all proportion. No, WE blew it out of all proportion.
“I thought `Quad` had that old Who thing but somehow it didn`t, it got lost again. It`s partly because we tried to do too much ourselves again and because we didn`t have a producer.
“And I think now`s the time we could all do a lot more in films. I mean we`ve got this one which, in Russell`s hands, is going to give us all another new dimension. I mean Moon for instance is fantastic in it. His Uncle Ernie is a bloody classic. No, I haven`t seen any of my own rushes yet, I don`t think I want to”.

Anyway, back to the subject at hand Roger…….
“Yeah, well we`ve wanted to do film things for the past four years and after this thing up and even if I do Liszt I`ll only do it if it says in the contract I can still work two days a week with the band. I mean we`ve GOT to work on the road and make more than one album a year. Otherwise it`s not the bleedin` Who, it`s a joke – like a session band.
“Look it`s not as upsetting as it could be because we`ve been through it all before and come out of it. It just gets me down when we play badly and those four nights we did in New York a couple of weeks ago weren`t good. Oh I mean the kids enjoyed it, but they`d have been happy if we`d got up there and farted. But there was only one night out of the four where we really played well and that`s just because we don`t work enough.
“Either we work or we don`t work. I`m not going on and on like this, because the Who are a bloody good band, they`re not a shit band.But we`ve got to stay on the ball. Gawd,” he sighs. “It`s at times like this that I wish the group wasn`t a name group. I wish we were small again so that we could just get on stage and gig. I think we should get out and play England in any little pissholes we can find”.

Daltrey has a habit of making you feel his frustration. Suddenly and strangely you`re getting as involved as he is, as worried that what he`s saying into a tape machine now is going to come out in cold print like a death knell. Good God y`ll what is happening here……?
But then maybe it`s not so strange. Ten years ago I looned out on Monday nights to The Scene Club to have my hand stamped in fluorescent ink and watch a band called the High Numbers. When, then, rock music was an exciting and unreliable child this band reflected it all. And that they became the Who and kept all that excitement is one of music`s more honourable hours.
Nostalgia may not be what it used to be, but the Who are definitely a band that hold a special place in everyone`s affections.
“Roger!” – the air of doom which suddenly hangs over our heads is whipped away by the entrance of the Who`s press brain, Keith Altham, bearing the trade papers. “It`s all conjecture” he says calmly. “After all how many other bands get involved in sole efforts and don`t split up. You`ve always had this “split” thing hanging over the Who right from the start – everything`ll be alright”.
Nice one Keith. Daltrey looks cheerier and starts leaping about getting ready for the afternoon`s shooting. Activily back to normal. Doug Clark comes breezing in to tell Roger he`s got to go to make up. Big next to Roger`s small brown frame, and with a creasing smile Doug is “Batman” to Daltrey`s “Robin”.

The stories start flowing again. The one about Moon getting so engrossed in his role as Uncle Ernie that where all the other actors used to filming – Oliver Reed, Jack Nicholson – could switch off their parts after a day`s work Moon couldn`t. And so Moon was Uncle Ernie morning, noon and night flashing raincoat and all.
The one about Roger having already started some background work into the life of Franz Liszt, discovering the fellow was pretty damn lary, and so christening him Franz Lust.
They reel out and we reel round some, I fear, just not printable here. But one of the best clean ones comes from Doug…
While they`ve been working in London some miles from the Daltrey manor house they`ve been staying in a penthouse on the 18th floor of a nearby hotel. One night last week, coming off set after ten hours solid slog, they staggered into the hotel in their T-shirts and jeans and went up to wash and change.
As they emerged from the penthouse lift, relates Doug, he was attacked by a frantic hotel employee who had leapt into the next lift and followed them up.
“Look here” he said grabbing Doug`s arm. “Don`t you realise that you building workers aren`t allowed up here on the 18th floor”.
Luckily the lead singer of the Who and the man about to immortalise Franz Liszt on celluloid was busy negotiating the lock on his room door and so was out of earshot.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: The Graeme Edge Band, Robin Trower, Man, Nigel Thomas, Chris Stainton, Chilli Willi, Robert Wyatt, J.J. Cale, Dobie Gray, Nazareth, Sonny Rollins, Druick and Lorange, The SHF Band.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT John Bundrick FROM SOUNDS, July 13, 1974

You don`t see an article in the mainstream music press with this man too often, so it is with great pleasure that I can re-publish this one. This man have worked with, among others, Free, The Who, Johnny Nash and Bob Marley.
Enjoy yourselves while I`m away. Tonight I will travel from Oslo to London and then further on to Doncaster in the Northern part of England. After a night in a hotel there I will go on to Grimsby and Cleethorpes to watch a great game of football between MK Dons and Grimsby on Saturday. Then on Tuesday it is back to London for a short stay there before going back to Trondheim on Wednesday evening. I will try to post here while I am away. And if you should be anywhere near the locations on my journey – look me up and we`ll have a pint and a talk!

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Broken Arrows and Dark Saloons

John Bundrick (Rabbit to you folks) has been around. He`s worked with some of the hottest names in Texas as well as Johnny Nash, Suzi Quatro and the legendary Free and is currently in Kevin Ayers band. He`s travelled the world and been interviewed by Pete Makowski, not bad for a little ol` Southern boy uh? He`s also had one solo album, “Broken Arrows”, released, has another in the can and is currently working on a third, here PM finds out what makes Rabbit run…

Versatility is the keyword to Rabbit`s success… or downfall. Y`see being one of the cream session guys Rabbit`s versatility makes him compatible with any artist from say Suzi Quatro to Kevin Ayers, yet on album he can be so diverse that he feels maybe people aren`t too keen on his variation.
“I`m trying to get into my own… er bag, so`s that people can recognise me… but then again I want to keep mah versatility.”

ARCHETYPAL

In his mid twenties Rabbit`s an archetypal Texan dude, drawl an` all. His hair is permanently dishevelled, his eyes droop indicating that he`s permanently in need of sleep, his features are similar to Todd Rundgren; the toothy grin and general air of untogetherness.
Yet even at his most disorganised times – Rabbit`s music flows out of him like the brandy in his bottle neat, strong with a touch of finesse about it. Not unlike yer McCartneys and yer Rundgrens, Rabbit`s a musical magician, he seems to manipulate music into whichever form he wishes, like an artist selecting tones and contrasts, he seems to have complete command over what he`s doing.

OVER-INDULGENT

It goes without saying that Rabbit`s first album “Broken Arrows” should have been a commercial smash, although Rabbit can appreciate its lack of success. “That album was me, I had total command over it, so it might have been too over indulgent.”
Still, not to worry. Rabbit trucks on in Island studios, recording overdubbing and mixing tracks that may have originally been laid down a year ago. His whole flat is littered with tapes and cassettes with Free, Jess Roden and countless other artists he`s worked with, his life seems to consist of all night recording session and gigs.

DRINKING

Ask him what he was doing a couple of months ago and he`ll screw his face into a pained concentration and then sigh, “Shit, y`know I can`t remember… I remember getting kicked off a gig for being drunk, but I can`t remember who it was with.”
Rabbit vividly remembers his short stint with Baldry`s band on the Faces tour. “I got that job through the band`s bassist Archie Leggett, who`s an amazing character. The basic problem about the tour was that audiences only wanted to see the Faces.
“We got kicked off that tour for drinking too much, y`know Rod Stewart just came on one night and said that`s it. But bands like that shouldn`t have support acts anyway.”

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FLUIDITY

Next Rabbit lent his able keyboard playing hands to the Kevin Ayers band. “That, again, was through Archie. They were looking for a keyboard player and he suggested me.”
Rabbit refers to Ayers and Co as his “new friends”, he had never heard of Nico, Cale and is not familiar with style of music: “I found it strange, but I knew given time I could get into it. It was different, kinda freaky, so I`ve been trying to make it funky freaky, cause when I play something I like to put feeling into it.
“I really dig Eno, he`s funky. Y`know that track “Baby`s On Fire”, I`d really dig to do a funky version of that, there`s also a Cale number I`d like to do. Eno`s a really weird keyboard player, he marks out the keys on his moog for every number he does and the rest of the sounds he gets by turning all the knobs and controls… which is really amazing.
“Cale and Nico reminded me of people I knew in Texas around `69… but `74 style. Kevin`s (Ayers) attitude to life is amazing, the whole thing was so loose. It wasn`t like Free where on a bad night there`d be arguments and punch ups.
“The thing about Kevin was, that I didn`t know anything about him, before I joined. I was really surprised that he was going down so well, because I had never heard of him before. I tried to add something to the music. Ollie Halsall is good but he`s awful fucking fast… another versatile person.
“The live album`s a bit untogether, but the feel`s there. We were only together for about three days.”
Did they rehearse beforehand. “Oh sure, but that`s a different thing. We rehearsed a helluva lot, but the whole thing was relaxed. Kevin rehearses like Johnny (Nash), gets the basic thing together and lets the rest of it sort itself out.”
Another main source of Rabbit`s concentration is his new album “Dark Saloons” which has been recorded over a period of a year using different musicians, studios and facilities.
The album on first hearing is much stronger and has much more fluidity, continuation. “The album`s been ready for quite a while, but the company are looking for an angle to promote it. I think what I really need is a strong single, and to get that I think it would be better if someone else produced it. Someone who`s commercially minded.
“I`ve approached Micky Most and he`s interested, but I`ve been kinda backing out all the time. If I produced I`d just put down what I wanted but Micky`s a single maker, a hit maker and he`d know what sound to get, which song would be right, I need someone with that kind of confidence to show me the way.”

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But what about on the album side, would Rabbit hand over his ticket to a reputed producer?
“Yeh, that`s what I worried about. Y`see if Micky does the single and that goes into the charts then maybe the company might want him to produce… I don`t think so, I`d like to carry on producing because that`s what I dig the most. I know I make a few mistakes, but I won`t be able to expand if I don`t carry on.
“Another thing I`m worried about is if I make it on a single level, I`ll have to somehow capture an album market.”
There`s no doubt that Rabbit is capable of writing a hit single. I mean anyone who`s produced, written and arranged songs for Johnny Nash must have a strong commercial ear.
“The last thing I heard from Johnny he was in Los Angeles and looking for strong single material. Y`see it`s singles again.
“I like the album because it sounds more like a band, tougher. The next album I want to be softer but still with a lot of bite.”
One side of the album features Johnny Nash`s band Sons Of The Jungle, orchestra conducted by Marty Ford and a Swedish band. Side two features the ripping guitar of Snuffy Walden another quality Texan musician.
“I`d really like to have Snuffy in a band or at least on a permanent recording basis. His playing adds that magical quality into my songs.”
And so Rabbit coasts along, playing sessions, recording tracks (he`s even got some songs ready for his third album) pretty unaffected by the surrounding world…
“Ah`m terrible at words”, he would sigh, “I failed English, History even Physical Education… but I passed music”. Nuff said.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Back Door, Kiki Dee, Mike Heron, Marty Wilde, KoKoMo, Fusion Orchestra, The Average White Band, Kevin Coyne, Ron Wood, Bridget St. John, Chip Taylor, Eric Clapton, Gryphon, Tangerine Dream.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT The Who FROM SOUNDS, May 25, 1974

Today I`m celebrating my Birthday. At my age there are no guarantees any more, so I will have myself a really nice party, get drunk and reflect on life. Here`s to another year gone by – may life treat us all good in 2019!

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Concert review from Charlton Athletic Football Ground

By Steve Peacock

They began at dusk when the stage lights were just beginning to have their full effect, and played on for more than two hours into a balmy summer night. Pete Townshend compared the feeling to the time they played at Woodstock, which raised a right-on or two from the people, and the Who certainly chalked up more than their share of highs as they brought Charlton to a close.
It was a long day, and I tend to suffer from sensory overload at all-day concerts anyway, so if I say that I thought the Who`s set was patchy and that they went on a bit where a spot of judicious editing wouldn`t have come amiss, you`ll have to bear my lack of stamina in mind.
Bear in mind also that Charlton was the first time out for their new “Tommy”-less and “Quadrophenia”-less set, and it seemed they didn`t quite have the measure of the pace of the new show. The shape of their set moved in rough parabolic curves (O level maths you see, can`t beat a good education) but often I felt the distance between the peaks was elongated too far: they stretched out numbers to the point where you began to suspect they were playing for time.
Also, Townshend had some problem with a guitar amp, and there was a buzz on the PA which occasioned much fist shaking from stage towards mixing desk. The PA had been crisp and clear throughout the day, but once the buzz had been eliminated there was an appreciable drop in level and clarity through the second half of the Who`s set.
That said, there`s no denying that the Who are a magnificent band, and when they were on there was no-one to touch them: Daltrey the champion mike-swinger, Townshend the acrobat (For music and presentation there isn`t a front team that comes near them – not Rod and Ronnie, not even Mick and Keith), Entwistle in flash jacket and Mr. Bassman pose, and Moon… what can you say? Yes, well don`t.

Da (rest) da da, da (rest) da da… they were off on a peak with “Can`t Explain” and “Summertime Blues”, and they finished on a peak with two versions of “My Generation” – the first one straight and heavy, the second in boogie style. When a band has that kind of repertoire from which to draw there`s no way you`re not going to get off.
Other high points for me were “Behind Blue Eyes” which came fairly early on, Entwistle`s eccentric “Boris The Spider”, “Baba O`Reilly”, “Won`t Get Fooled Again”, “Magic Bus” and “See Me, Feel Me”: it was during that song that somebody scored bonus points for event management by turning on the full glare of Charlton`s floodlights to expose a sea of thousands of waving arms, stretched out towards the stage right back across the ground and up the terrace opposite. It was a breathtaking sight.
That`s the kind of thing that can only happen at events like Charlton and that is why they`re worth any amount of hanging around getting headaches and snarling at people who tread on your feet.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Goldie Zelkowitz, Curtis Knight, Simon Alexander, Steely Dan, Chris Stainton, Ronnie Lane, Elliott Murphy, Loudon Wainwright, Tim Buckley, Steve Miller, Beach Boys, Tommy Vance, Jim Simpson, Stefan Grossman, Lynsey de Paul, Mott the Hoople, Kevin Ayers,
Dave Cousins, ELP.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Keith Moon (The Who) FROM SOUNDS, December 29, 1973

Enjoy this great chat with Keith Moon from the last number of Sounds in 1973. Difficult to believe all those myths about him when you read this one. He probably did have a “bad” way to behave on occasion , but as is common in so many of us, we have a little bit of light and shade in our personalities. Hell of a drummer, he sure was.

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Life in the old Tom yet

Steve Peacock talking to Keith Moon

We`d been told that Keith Moon was ill, thus he wasn`t appearing in “Tommy”, but as often happens that wasn`t quite the case. In fact, he said, he`d never agreed to do “Tommy” at the Rainbow this year in the first place, but they`d said he would, and excused his withdrawal on the grounds that he was ill. Such is showbiz.
In fact, Mr. Moon was looking in peak condition, dressed as he was in impeccable early sixties gear – from the black, exquisitely tailored three-button jacket, the broad pink-stripped shirt with white button-down collar and black knitted tie, the slightly flared black cord trousers, to the original “She Loves You” stomping Beatle boots with cuban heels and pointed toes – all genuine and from the wardrobe of Mr. R. Starr.

FILM

He`d been for a screen test for a part Ringo was to play in the film “Stardust” – he already has a part in it, but they asked him, so why not? And, in fact, he was planning to visit the Rainbow for “Tommy” – but in a purely backstage role. He had promised, he said, to keep Viv Stanshall sober. No comment.
And he had been ill – though that was during the Who`s American tour. Or rather: “I`d been made ill. Someone put elephant tranquiliser in my drink. We found out later from the San Francisco hospital that four people who`d drunk from the same brandy bottle as me had been laid out, but fortunately I have a strong constitution and I didn`t notice it until it started to hit me towards the end of the show – then I was a total blank for ten hours. It seems the West Coast is very good at that kind of thing, they seem to think it`s funny, but if I ever found out who did it I`d rip his arm off and beat him to death with it.” Merry prankster, you have been warned.

BORED

As for “Tommy”, well – he feels he`s done that show as many times as he wants to, and he didn`t particularly want to get up on stage and flash through Uncle Ernie one more time: “It`s like playing the same song over and over again – eventually you get bored with it so you leave it out of the act. I`ve got fed up with playing the same part over and over again, so I`ve left it out of my act – no reason other than that.”
Or sometimes you re-arrange the number, and in a new form. Uncle Ernie Moon will go through the hoop just one more time. Keith has a number of projects on the go at the moment, including the “Stardust” film in March – which is loosely a follow-up to “That`ll Be The Day” with David Essex – Who tours of Europe and America later in 1974, and the film version of “Tommy” with Ken Russell directing, which they`ll be shooting in April. Earlier in the New Year, the Who will be recording some new Townshend songs for the film`s soundtrack. As musicians the “Tommy” film involves the whole group, but as actors it involves Roger and Keith “more than Pete and John. They really don`t have any interest in acting – John, for instance, would much rather be in the studio making music than making films, whereas with me it`s vice versa.”
So there`s life in the old deaf and dumb friend yet: you`d have thought that “Tommy” had had such a run with and without the Who that it would be very difficult to breathe new life into it. “Which is why it had to be Ken Russell – he`s the only person who could do that, the only person I know anyway. He came down to the studio while we were recording `Quadrophenia`, and he impressed each of us… he seemed one of the most perceptive men I`ve met. He really is an amazing man – if you start a sentence he`ll not only finish it for you, but go into the next one while you`re still thinking about it. I`m really looking forward to working with him.
“I spent a couple of hours with him over a bottle of wine at his house, and the way he saw the characters, the way he`d developed the characters, and the ideas he was coming up with… they`ve never ever been done like Ken`s going to do `em. His whole conception of `Tommy` is totally different from the way anyone else has seen it, but it`s still `Tommy`.”

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Could he be more specific? “Well no, not really – you`d have to spend a couple of hours with Ken Russell. But then we`ve got to see whether the ideas work, so the only way you can really know is to see the film.”
And so to “Stardust”. It`s a follow up to “That`ll Be The Day”, he says, in so much as that film covered a period up to the Beatles and the British invasion of America, and this one will take in the period from then up to the present day. “That`ll Be The Day” was: “a kind of English version of `American Graffitti` – America couldn`t  really identify with it, but this one goes from the Liverpool thing, the Beatles thing – which is one of the reasons Ringo didn`t want to do it, because he`s been through all that – brings the English and American things together, and then follows them as they began to find their own identities again.”
So while “That`ll Be The Day” was really more concerned with what was happening around the music of Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, and all those people – life as related to the jukebox and transistor radio speaker – “Stardust” will concern itself more with the life and times of musicians and others in the business of music. “It`s more involved with the pressures the musicians were under – the agency problems, management problems, what it takes to get a group to America, advertising bullshit and the hype that goes on to get a record in the charts – all that kind of `for God`s sake don`t say balls to a reporter, and don`t forget your 17` stuff. I think a lot of people will be more interested in that than in hearing a lot of oldies but goldies.”
Once again, Ray Conally has written the script, and Keith is more than happy: “He`s great, because he says `if you don`t like the way I`ve written this bit then I`ll change it, or you can write it, or we`ll write it together` – the important thing to him is to get it right for the person who`s playing it. He doesn`t feel he`s written a successful part unless the person who`s playing it feels comfortable saying the words.”
It seems that in the way Keith is able to work in films, he`s in an ideal situation. He`s able to be involved with all the aspects of creating a movie, rather than merely being one of the director`s pawns as we`re led to believe is generally the case. Hitchcock`s cattle – actors dictum seems as far away as the man with the cigar doing his `sign here and I`ll make you a star` routine in the pop world.

FLIPPANT

“Well, we`re all involved in trying to get the best film we can – that`s the most important thing. If I`m best at doing one thing, then I`ll do that, and the same with the others. We all get on well together, and we`ve all shared the same experiences, but on different levels. For instance, Ray`s never been on the road so when he says `what`s it like to be stuck in the back of a transit for eight hours?` I can tell him. I can`t write it, but I can explain to him what it feels like to be stuck in the back of a bloody transit for eight hours, and he can put it into words.
“There`s this great rapport, and it`s so much fun working on a film right from when it`s conceived, through the casting stage – thinking `who`ll be best for that bit, who`s really gone through that?` – right to making it. We don`t take it lightly, I don`t want to make it sound flippant, but the idea of one person directing on his own, one person casting, one person doing something else just doesn`t apply any more. That kind of enthusiasm comes out in the film, and it shows – on the screen it shows.”

ACTOR

He seems to have made the switch from drummer with the Who to film actor with remarkable ease. “I don`t think I`ve ever not been an actor – I`ve always been an actor that plays the drums. I haven`t been a film actor, but there are many aspects of acting – it`s just different ways of projecting. You project through the theatre on stage with the Who, and you project in a different way to a camera for a film – it`s the same thing, just a different approach. On a screen that`s maybe 70 foot wide, you may only have to lift your little finger, whereas to get the same effect on stage you`d have to swing your whole arm.”
He`s always been an actor – I wonder. Has he just been playing the part of the crazy drummer from the Who all these years? Are you an actor offstage Keith? “I seldom stop acting, except… well, when I`m asleep.”
Is it a conscious thing? “Not all the time. I`m a natural extrovert, and if I want to get a point across then I`ll use expressions – vocal or physical – that`ll do it. That`s what acting is, I suppose, and it comes very naturally to me.”
So instead of sitting in a hotel room saying “I`m bored”, you`ll throw the bed out of the window? “Something like that.”
There was that disturbance in Montreal for instance. “Ah, yes… well, it just escalates. `Oh dea, vats zis, it`s fallen off ze table… appears to have smashed on zose glasses zere… ooooh, dear, oh dear, now you`ve knocked a chair over and the cushions and the desk`s fallen over… bam, bam, bam, bam… oh dear, now the television seems to have gone out the window…`

“It`s not planned, it just escalates, the adrenalin builds up and then bingo – `what would you like? Cold coffee, a bit of toast and six hours in Montreal nick. I shall have to write to the Queen about that really – Canadian breakfasts are terrible. I`ve had much better in Holloway. She`s neglecting the colonies – `bout time she went over there, showed the old boat race again.”
One of the best descriptions I heard of that kind of human whirlwind was by the novelist Edna O`Brien. On TV, Russell Harty asked her if she ever `freaked out`. Yes, she said, in the sense that she got into something to such an extent that she just didn`t think about ever coming back.
“You do”, affirms Mr. Moon. “You just become one with all of it, and then when you`re brought down and all of a sudden you`re sitting in the back of a Black Maria, that`s when it hits you. (In his best downtrodden Dudley Moore voice): `Dear Mum, once again Life has stood up and punched me right between the eyes.`
“That`s when you`re back to reality. It`s impossible to explain, it`s complete escapism. You`ve got all this energy which has got to go somewhere – and it takes you.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Leo Sayer, Tim Bogert, Gallagher&Lyle, Keith Emerson, Deep Purple, Magma.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Roger Daltrey (The Who) FROM SOUNDS, September 15, 1973

A very good insight into what was happening around the band before the release of “Quadrophenia”. Deserves to be read.
Ok, I will be off to Copenhagen this weekend, so I will see you around again on Monday with a very good article on a band who, among other things, drew attention to a machine for driving piles into the ground.

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The Thinking Man`s Who

Roger Daltrey talks to Rob Mackie about the new Who album, `Tommy` on film and much more

Behind the penetratingly blue eyes of Roger Daltrey is no kind of sad man. Roger has every reason to feel sour. In the first place, it`s criminal to have to leave a beautiful country home for the sweat of central London on the sort of day when the London papers are fond of exclaiming `Phew, what a scorcher!`
It`s one of those days that turns the other cheek around lunchtime, and slyly changes from being hot and sunny to being sweaty and brooding. On top of that, Roger has no sooner got to Track`s Windmill Street offices and parked than some dolt backs into his car leaving a few scratch marks on the shiny blue chrome.
However, a couple of cups of tea, and Roger`s soon revived and happy enough, turning a creaky wooden chair into a rocking chair somewhat perilously, in Track`s little downstairs studio, he chats about this and that in the multifarious activities of the Who, and sounds always like someone who knows what he wants, makes up his mind about it and sticks with it, making the best of the situation.
It`s true of the interview itself, and it`s true of the way Roger comes over physically and in what he says. He`s not one, for instance, to have a big pop star wardrobe full of flashy clothes. He seems to choose what suits him and leave the rest in the shops. Here he is in his `Best` T-shirt, which I seem to remember him wearing when he played “Tommy” at the Rainbow.
Since then, Roger`s become a star in his own right as well, and it`s typical that he did it with a good, clean straightforward set of… well, pop songs I suppose. Songs, anyway that everyone could understand, identify with and enjoy, not the `pandering to the masses` approach that pop has come to mean. Roger describes them as “Just good songs to hum in the loo.”

In “Quadrophenia”, Roger`s saddled again with his old `bad` role in the group, but I reckon an important part of his role in the group has been as a sort of anchor to keep the ship tied to a firm base through some of the more outrageous and at times unworkable schemes to have emanated from various and fertile Who brains.
Roger has enough common sense and confidence to know when to dig his heels in. I must be about the 101st person to tell him that surely “One Man Band” would be the best follow-up single to “Giving It All Away”, but Roger knows better, and I expect he`ll be proved right.
“Everybody`s said that,” said Roger, with a slight hint of exasperation, tipping his chair back a little more precariously than usual, but of course, maintaining his balance. “I`ve never thought that though. It`s just too obvious. The only reason I`m putting a single out now is because the record company wants one out. I`m not prepared to go on and record something just for a single, so they said they were taking one off “Daltrey”, and at least they`ve given me the opportunity to decide which one we`re going to use.
“I don`t think `One Man Band` will stand up to a lot of play, it`s so instant. You shouldn`t necessarily like a single first time. `Giving It All Away` took such a long time to grow on some people, that once it did, it was a good sign because a single has to stand up to so much airplay. That`s always assuming that `Thinking` is going to get a lot of airplay,” he adds with a laugh.
In case you don`t remember the title from the album, it`s the one which begins “I was just thinking about a girl,” and one of the songs that best shows how well Roger can build a song`s drama with his vocals, and without the aid of three madmen pounding away behind him as usual.

The difference meant being forced into a healthy change of outlook and attitude. “That whole album was feeling a way through and searching for something outside of the Who. I`m a rock and roll singer with what I think is the best rock and roll band in the world, and if I sing rock`n`roll, it belongs to that. With the band, I was getting into the state of thinking I knew exactly what to do with each song, when I did this, I put the Who out of my mind, and thought about different ways and techniques of singing, and after doing the Who`s album, which we`ve just finished, I know that it definitely has helped.
“The album that we`ve just done, the guy is a very mixed up, screwed-up kid, and I think I`ve managed to get that effect, just little differences, but I think it`s worked.”
So from one new solo role, playing himself, Roger`s been thrown straight into another alter ego, which will perhaps escalate and mushroom as much as “Tommy” has. Already, what was originally planned as half a double album has become an entire project with enough available Townshend songs to fill at least two double albums.
Roger`s role? “I`m the aggressive, nasty, mean, drink all the booze sort of job, John`s sensitive, Keith is the absolute madman, and Pete is the religious type – God if you like. My role? Yes I think it`s about right!” he chortles. “No it`s more as I was really, the album`s about the past – he`s on a boat and looking back at all the things he`s been through. Which is more or less what we`re doing now, trying to find a new direction.”
But Roger remains steadfastly behind the idea of quality rather than quantity. “We`re not the sort of band that can say `We`ve got to make an album, lads. Let`s go in the studio next week and bash out a couple of tunes.
“It`s not worth recording like that for a band like the Who. It would kill us. With us, it`s not just an album, but a whole thing to follow. It`s problems for us, but we thrive on them.”

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Will the quadrophenic Jimmy mushroom in the same way as “Tommy” has through the various media? Roger thinks that musically it`s better, but he`s a little worried, from the point of view that the subject matter may be a bit less universal.
“The Americans` idea of a mod is somebody wearing a bull`s eye T-shirt, which is not really what it`s all about, you know. It`s hard to think how other people are going to react to it, all it is at the moment is a lot of songs and some ideas. I haven`t even heard it as a total thing myself.
“Besides which, once we get it on the road, it develops. The kids made “Tommy” what it was, we didn`t. We made the record, and helped it on its way.”
Which brought us on to the “Tommy” film, about which Roger is thoroughly enthusiastic, even though it`s going to mean going over some old ground again. “I think it`s perfect for a film, and Ken Russell`s the perfect director. I promise you that will be the last thing we do to do with “Tommy”, though.
“I think `Tommy` can say a hell of a lot more than `Jesus Christ Superstar` has ever said, and Russell`s got a lot of good ideas.
The roles? “I`d like someone like Mick Jagger to play the pinball wizard. The mother`s really difficult… they`re all going to have to be really good professional people. I`d think of someone like Bette Midler. Moon`s playing Uncle Ernie of course, or if you like Moon`s playing Moon.
“It`s gonna be acting and singing, I think there`s about one spoken word, and all the instrumentals will just be visuals, which is all you need, and that`s why Russell will be so bloody perfect for it. His visuals will be some of the best I`ve ever seen.”
Needless to say, Roger will be Tommy, although there will also be a second Tommy for the childhood parts. The score is set to be started on January 1, and before then the Famous Who Tour, the first here for two years, may actually have taken place. The plans, which are still not finalised, are for the band to play about seven Northern gigs, hopefully including two each in Manchester and Newcastle, and then go to the States for 10 days, and come back and play four or five days in London.

After two years of busy seclusion, the Who are girding their loins to hit us on all fronts again. In what spare time he has had, Roger`s been slaving over his extensive home and garden, and is now in a condition of near athlete fitness that he feels is necessary for the sort of extended controlled energies that go into a series of Who concerts.
The thought of actually being on the road again brings out a mixture of strong emotions. “We`re frightened to death, but we know we`ll take it in our stride.
Roger doesn`t expect they`ll make much money from the English tour, but does expect a lot of fun.
We went upstairs for a quick preview of Quadrophenia`s own Pinball Wizard, a number called “5.15”, which will be backed with the stage number “Water”, for a pre-album taster.
I`m not really supposed to review it, but suffice it to say that when the Who said they were getting a little too ordered and smooth on “Who`s Next”, I didn`t really believe it until you compare this one, which builds from a subtle start to all the dirt and grit of yer archetypal `oo. It had Roger and I helplessly bopping in the offices, and should be coming your way in little more than a month.
We pored over some possible album sleeves as well, and it seems as sure as makes no difference that the front will be a stark, striking photo of a back-view mod on a flash mid-sixties scooter with fur on the back and all mod cons. A lot of its atmosphere comes from the ethereal misty smoke behind him, putting the whole thing somewhere between dreams and reality.
It sets the tone brilliantly – a look back at the frustrated angry pill-popper of “My Generation” with hindsight but without condescension. That`s the Who `73 really. Still fighting not to be establishment, still as different as air, earth, fire and water, still as similar as the four liths of an orange. And still the best living definition of that time-honoured term “rock`n`roll.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dale Griffin, Roxy Music, Jess Roden, Billy Preston, Nick Mason, Home, Hemlock, Lou Reizner, Commander Cody, Elton John, Rolling Stones, Tony McPhee, America, Martin Carthy.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.