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ARTICLE ABOUT The A-Z of Heavy Metal FROM SOUNDS (Part 4), April 26, 1975

So, as mentioned before, this concludes this series as I don`t have the next number of Sounds which ended with bands up to the letter Z.
I guess the two journalists in question here would correct a couple of things if they had the chance… among them the name of Kiss`s second album and the very strange omission of a band like Led Zeppelin in this article. They may not have been “metal” enough, but then some other bands shouldn`t be here too.
Read on!

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Rock from `eavy to `umble or
The Sounds A – Z of Heavy Metal

Compiled by Pete Makowski and Geoff Barton

H

Hardstuff

A hard rocking unit who recorded two albums on the Purple label (`Bullet Proof` and `Bolex Demtia`) then split. The band consisted of John Cann (guitar), ex-Atomic Rooster bassist John Gustafson and Paul Hammond (drums).

Hawkwind

You know the Hawks. Been together for years, once a people`s band, latterly spaced-out cosmic trippers with a diverting light show. Heavy as an asteroid; loud as a rocket blast; entertaining as a sci-fi novel. Their albums on UA are all readily available: `Hawkwind`, `In Search Of Space` (a classic), `Doremi Fasol Latido`, `Space Ritual` and `Hall Of The Mountain Grill`. Freak hit was `Silver Machine`. Follow-up `Urban Guerilla` was almost a success, too, but got deleted because of political implications. Current effort, `Kings Of Speed`, is the plague of the SOUNDS office.

Heavy Metal Kids

Came shortly after Silverhead and had that same punk rock appeal about them. Headed by mouthpiece Gary Holton they have been progressively building a strong following although their debut album on Atlantic didn`t sell as well as expected. Since then Micky Waller (ex Jeff Beck drummer) has left to form his own band and the band have changed their name to the Kids.

Hendrix

If the Troggs took Chip Taylor`s `Wild Thing` and made it kind of sleazy, Jimi Hendrix took it and gave it a sense of menace – which is why Makowski decides to include Hendrix but exclude the Troggs from this exhaustive list. One presumes. When Hendrix was on he was magnificent – one of the few men who could take the solo guitar and make it sound so good it didn`t need another instrument within a thousand miles. He could also be unbearably tiresome, over-extending licks and riffs until they bled white. But who else could have taken `Star Spangled Banner` and made it work for young America?

Humble Pie

At one time the Pie looked like strong contenders for the rock and roll throne the Stones had been so comfortably sitting on. They had a hard rhythmic style to put them in that league. The band were formed in `68. The combination of Steve Marriott, both from huge groups of that era (the Small Faces and the Herd respectively), sealed the band`s success from the start. Ex Art and Spooky Tooth bassist Greg Ridley and Jerry Shirley completed the line up. Their move to A&M from Immediate in 1970 coincided with a transition in the band`s style, a more aggressive brutal sound. This plus their consistent roadwork led to their imminent success in States and this country (they released three albums during this period `Humble Pie`, `Rock On` and `Live At The Fillmore`). It was obvious that Frampton and Marriott were taking two opposite musical directions and this led with the departure of the former who went to form his own band – Camel, who are still recording on the A&M label. The Pie took on the guitar services of ex Bakerloo, Colosseum man Dave Clempson. The band`s sound became more basic, the `white man soul` vocals of Marriott came to the forefront and they produced one killer of an album titled `Smokin“ in `72. This was followed by three less inspiring efforts (Eat It`, `Thunderbox` and `Streets Rats`) and the band are in the process of splitting.

Hustler

Formerly Flesh, this band first made their mark at the Marquee club where they built up a strong following. The line up then consisted of Steve Haynes (vocals), Micky Lluelyn (guitar), Kenny Lyons (bass), Kenny Daughters (organ) and Tony Beard (drums). They recorded their debut album last year on the Firefly label called `High Street` produced by ex Vinegar Joe guitar player Pete Gage. Since then the band have seen the departure of Beard who has been replaced by ex Tundra man Henry Spinetti.

Hydra

Out of the same camp as the Allmans/Marshall Tucker/Wet Willie, the guitar of Spencer Kirkpatrick and vocalist Wayne Bruce make this band a powerful, up front outfit. A four piece with only one album to their credit but worth watching. A big reputation down South.

I

Iggy Pop

He emulated his heroes – Jagger and the Doors – with unrestrained and exaggerated vigour. A showman supreme, he got a band together in his Ann Arbor home town in `69. Their sheer punk rock enthusiasm made up for their lack of musical skill, but essentially they were a live band and their albums sounded empty save a couple of songs that just happened to work. They recorded two albums on Elektra (`The Stooges` produced by ex Velvet John Cale, and `Funhouse`). Later Bowie produced them (`Raw Power`) an improvement, it was hailed by critics, but Iggy mysteriously disappeared and has had an uneven career since.

Iron Butterfly

Iron Butterfly are, arguably, the most successful, as far as record sales go, of all heavy bands. Their album `In-A-Gadda-Vida` shifted an incredible amount of copies and was just about the Sixties most successful album – it was the first to be awarded a platinum disc and stayed in the US charts for 140 weeks (Butterfly sold, in all, some seven million albums in that decade). They began in San Diego in 1966 and recorded their first album `Iron Butterfly – Heavy` within a year. Six albums were released by the band and all hit the US charts. Their original line up was Erik Braunn guitar, Lee Dorman bass, Ron Bushy drums and Doug Ingle organ and vocals. Later Braunn was replaced by two guitarists, Mike Pinera and Larry Reinhardt. They were basically a heavy blues based outfit with an irritating penchant for electronic gimmickry. Ingle, the band`s leader, had an eerie vocal style which became their trademark. Butterfly have recently reformed with two original members, Braunn and Bushy, and two new members, Phil Kramer bass and vocals, Howard Reitzes keyboards and vocals. They have an album, `Scorching Beauty`, out currently on MCA. It`s marginally better/worse than anything they`ve done before, depending on which way you look at it.

J

James Gang

Formed in Cleveland, Ohio the original band consisted of Joe Walsh (guitar, keyboards, vocals), Jimmy Fox (drums) and Dale Peters (bass). The band produced a versatile range of what could be described as tasteful rock and roll. Walsh`s musical ambitions led to his departure and current solo successes after four albums (`Yer Album`, `Rides Again`, `Thirds`, `Live In Concert`). The remaining two employed the talents of Dominic Trojano for two albums (`Strait Shooter` and `Passin` Thru`), then left to record a solo album and is currently with The Guess Who. He was replaced by Denver guitarist Tommy Bolin and they have recorded two albums (`Gang Bang` and `Miami`). Now they`re a good rock band but nowhere near the standards of the original Walsh line-up.

Jo Jo Gunne

They never managed to sustain the success they had with their first single `Run, Run, Run`. The band was formed by two ex Spirit members Jay Ferguson (keyboards) and John Locke (bass). After three albums guitarist Matthew Andes left to be replaced by John Stahaley (formerly Spirit and Stahaley Brothers).

Judas Priest

Birmingham five piece who look like they could step into Sabbath`s shoes judging by the response they`ve been getting on tour. They have an album out on Gull records and are currently working on new product.

K

Kiss

Rock and roll meets Hammer films. Kiss have tried to combine glamour, horrorock, showmanship… if there was a drink comparable to their mixture of styles you`d have to have a strong stomach to hold it down. The band consists of Peter Criss (drums), Gene Simmons (guitar), Paul Stanley (guitar), Space Age Frehley (lead guitar) and they`ve recorded three albums (`Kiss`, `Nothing To Lose`, `Dressed To Kill`) on the Casablanca label.

L

Love Sculpture

Featuring Dave Edmunds and a bit bemused when their heavying-up of `Sabre Dance` was Number One here in 1967, they were “A local band that was never meant to be” according to their leader. They toured America because it was a good way to get their air fares paid, but split up when they got home. What really put the cap on it was when they found themselves topping the bill over Joe Cocker. They thought the joke had gone far enough.

Lynyrd Skynyrd

Seven piece Skynyrd have taken the States by storm over the last couple of years, their first album setting some non-Southern dudes back on their heels. Three guitars lead the Skynyrd attack but from evidence of their last (third) album they`ve taken their foot off the gas a bit.

M

Mahogany Rush

When Frank Marino was only fourteen years old, he had a bum trip. When he recovered in hospital he discovered he had suddenly acquired an adeptness for playing the guitar, he could play the solo on Garcias `Viola Blues` note for note even though he never heard it before. Then Hendrix overtook his style.

May Blitz

Headed by ex-Jeff Beck drummer Tony Newman, this band were given a lot of promo but didn`t live up to it. They recorded two albums on the Vertigo label (`May Blitz`, `2nd Of May`) and split.

MC5

`Brothers and sisters! I wanna see your hands up there! Lemme see your hands! I wanna hear some revolution out there brothers! I wanna hear a little revolution! It`s time to move! It`s time to testify! And I wanna know – are you ready to testify? Are you ready? I give a testimonial – the MC5!` So begins one of rock`s heaviest (if not the heaviest) live albums, the Motor City Five`s `Kick Out The Jams`. The band had several albums released over here on both the Elektra and Atlantic labels, but all have long since been deleted. The only MC5 material currently readily (or easily) available is a track on the `Age Of Atlantic` sampler album, `Tonight`. Brief facts: the band originated in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in the early/middle Sixties; their trademark: unsubtle, unsophisticated, often barely competent metal which assaulted you (both live and on record even at the most moderate volume) with the force of a fragmentation bomb and the intensity of a dentist`s drill; they were extremely politically orientated, turning up and gigging at many a revolutionary, extremist party rally; Rob Tyner, vocalist, was (and probably still is) the epitome of the perpetually screaming, practically out of tune rock singer. The MC5 once proted Norman Mailer to write a particularly gruesome account of one of their concerts. It`s a fact not too widely known that the jingle for Noel Edmonds` jolly `Kick Out The Jams` spot in his morning show comes from the album of the same name, except that it`s cleverly censored: the MC5 scream, `and right now it`s time to – kick out the jams, mother fuckers!`, while Noel has sensibly toned this down for his listeners and inserted `brothers and sisters` for the offensive final word.

Montrose

American band featuring ex- Edgar Winter sideman and sessionist Ronnie Montrose on blistering guitar. First album, released in 1973, was a rocker from end to end. Curiously, the band (at least on the two occasions I`ve seen them) fail to match up to their recorded sounds in live performance. Original line-up: Ronnie Montrose guitar, Sam Hagar vocals, Bill Church bass, Denny Carmassi drums. Alan Fitzgerald replaced Church for the second album `Paper Money` and Hagar recently left to form his own band, Sammy Wilde And The Dust Cloud. A new vocalist has not yet been announced, though Montrose is still intact.

Mott The Hoople

Mott the Hoople were always a schizophrenic band. Being the brainchild of Guy Stevens, they couldn`t have been anything but – he wanted a group that merged the Rolling Stones with Procol Harum. So their early albums zigzagged from manic, bad tempered thrash to reflective ballads – a quality that wasn`t reflected in the anarchy of their invariably shambolic live gigs. Finally, they gave up and split up. Then Bowie, `Dudes` and success. But Mott had always been a loser band, stumbling from one crisis to the next, and they remained so – once the original line-up split (Mick Ralphs and Verden Allen moving on ultimately to Bad Company and Cheeks) and the permutations of guitarists and keyboardmen started, the rot had set in. They fizzled out with Ian Hunter unable and unwilling to carry on as the group lynchpin any more. His solo career continues with the last Mott guitarist, ex-Spider, Mick Ronson, on another schizoid course; while the Mott remnants are about to record their first album with a new (secret) singer and guitarist. The future is uncertain as ever the past was.

Mountain

If Cream had never existed it`s doubtful that Mountain would have followed. Felix Pappalardi (Cream producer and bassist in his own right) pulled together the talents of Leslie West (guitar), formerly with a band called the Vagrants, Corky Laing (drums) and Steve Knight (keyboards) and broke really big in America but couldn`t repeat the feat in Britain. Felix had a great influence on Cream in the studio and some of these themes were much evident in albums such as `Nantucket Sleighride` and `Flowers Of Evil`. The band split in 1972 and spawned West, Bruce and Laing but reformed following the WB&L collapse only to work sporadically. Best albums vie between `Nantucket` and `Climbing`.

N

Nazareth

A dynamic rock and roll four piece (Dan McCafferty, vocals, Manny Charlton, guitar, Pete Agnew, bass, Darryl Sweet, drums) from Dunfermline didn`t take off until the release of their third album `Razamanaz`. This was followed by chart appearances (`Broken Down Angel`, `This Flight Tonight`). Their next two albums (`Loud `n` Proud` and `Rampant`) sold well but their popularity waned in Britain when they concentrated their energies abroad where they are in the big league. The band have returned in powerful form with `Hair Of The Dog` which was produced by Charlton (the previous three were produced by ex-Purple man Roger Glover).

New York Dolls

`Too Much, Too Soon` was an appropriate title for their second album, the Dolls never quite seemed to make it. Visually and musically they were meant to represent New Yawk debauchery, the kid of the street sound. The band – David Johansen (vocals), Johnny Thunders (guitar), Sylvain Sylvain (bass) and Jerry Nolan (drums) – built a large following at Max`s Kansas City which captured the heart of the critics but were limited in their audience appeal (mainly confined to areas that were attracted by glitter rock).

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frank Zappa, Gladys Knight, Women In Rock, Betty Wright, Steve Harley, Peter Frampton, Labelle, Peter Skellern, Ray Davies, Larry Uttal, Chris Spedding, Anne Murray, Sweet Sensation, Bernard Purdie, Mike Harding, Ronnie Lane, Yes.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT The A-Z of Heavy Metal FROM SOUNDS (Part 3), April 26, 1975

And we continue with part 3 in these series. I must admit that I didn`t know all these bands/artist before reading about them here. Funny how some fell by the wayside and others became household names.
Read on!

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Rock from `eavy to `umble or
The Sounds A – Z of Heavy Metal

Compiled by Pete Makowski and Geoff Barton

D

Deep Purple

Originally the band sounded like the culmination of all the things that Vanilla Fudge had striven for. Elaborate arrangements, well played rock. The band was formed by ex Artwoods and Flowerpot man Jon Lord, Ritchie Blackmore (ex Screaming Lord Sutch, Neil Christians and the Crusaders) and former Searcher Chris Curtis in `68. Curtis left and was replaced by bass player Nick Simper plus the addition of vocalist Rod Evans. The band recorded three albums with this format – `Shades Of Deep Purple`, `Book Of Talysein` and `Deep Purple`. Evans split to the States to form Captain Beyond with ex-Iron Butterfly guitarist Mike Pinera and Bobby Caldwell. Simper went on to join Warhorse. Simper and Evans were replaced by Roger Glover and Ian Gillan respectively. They recorded `In Rock` in 1970, and the distinct sound of Blackmore`s piercing, innovative guitar style that took Hank Marvin`s tremelo one step further, plus the screaming banshee vocals of Gillan made this THE definitive progressive rock album. Purple rose from the underground following when they achieved commercial success (`Black Night`, Strange Kind Of Woman` and `Fireball`). They achieved gargantuan popularity in the States with `Machine Head` which was the top selling US album in `73. An album later Gillan and Glover split and the future of the band was dubious, but they went on and added unknown vocalist Dave Coverdale and ex Trapeze bassist Glenn Hughes. This made for a change in the band`s music, but not in the impetus of their success.

Deviants

While the rest of the world was dressing up in beads and kaftans, Mick Farren and the Social Deviants, taking their cue from the MC5, hopped into their leathers and became a street punk rock politico band. In other words, they bashed it out loud and had titles like `Let`s Loot The Supermarket`. They were born in Spring 1967 with Farren, Duncan Sanderson and Russ Hunter as the core and the fluctuating guitar team of Paul Rudolf and Sid Bishop. By the end of `67 they`d dropped the social bit (well, says Farren, “it was a bit long and cumbersome to say”) and they broke up during a tour of America in 1969. Russ and Sandy joined up with Twink and Rudolf in the Pink Fairies. The Deviants left behind three albums – `Ptoof`, `Disposable` and `Deviants`. The Pink Fairies were worthy successors, but they too are defunct now. Paul Rudolf now has The Paul Rudolf Bugs Bunny Drugs Band.

E

Eire Apparent

Eire Apparent is notable for two things – the presence of guitarist Henry McCullogh, subsequently with the Grease Band, Wings, and, occasionally, Frankie Miller and the production of Jimi Hendrix. One Buddah single, `Rock`n`Roll Band` shows just how well the combination worked.

F

Fanny

This four piece all girl group stripped away all the pre-conceived chauvinistic views of women in rock. They could hit as hard as a battering ram. Formed in California the original line up consisted of June Millington (guitar/vocals), Jean Millington (bass/vocals), Alice De Buhr (drums) and Nickey Barclay (keyboards/vocals). The popularity of this band opened a market for other female rock bands (Isis, Birtha, Mother Trucker). June Millington was the first to leave the band and was replaced by Suzi Quatro`s sister Patti. Nickey Barclay, who was the band`s main writer, left last year to form her own band, Good News.

Foghat

Energy laden, blues based rock and roll laced with glamour. Foghat were one of those bands, like Climax Chicago, struck big in America but haven`t even created a ripple of interest in this country. The original band were ex-Savoy Brown members Rod Price (guitar), Tony Stevens (bass), and Roger Earl (drums). They were soon joined by `Lonesome` Dave Peverett on guitar. They have recorded three successful albums (`Rock & Roll`, `Energized`, `Rock And Roll Outlaws`), on Bearsville label and recently Tony Stevens left to be replaced by Nick Jameson.

Andy Fraser Band

Fraser surfaced with a new band following Sharks and an aborted liaison with Frankie Miller – Nick Judd on keyboards, Kim Turner on drums and Fraser on lead bass and vocals. They`re the loudest I`ve heard in a long time and as cocky and as unsubtle as you like.

Fusion Orchestra

Later re-titled Jill Saward`s Fusion Orchestra, this band is not so much heavy as flashy, visually and musically. When last seen, Jill would whirl dervish-like from instrument to instrument as if seeking an electric Holy Grail. A somewhat frenzied band, in which the drummer has been known to do a solo stretching from one end of the hall to the other.

G

Brian Gamage And The Spikes

Issued a single, `Brain Damage`, in mid-1974. It featured a guitar solo played by hurling a meathook at a highly amplified Stratocaster. The band were first formed in 1963 and the current, ever-changing line-up stands at Brian Gamage vocals, Carole Lewis bugle (the only two remaining original members), Arthur Boonstock harpsichord and Ollibund Socket assorted tympani. Their long-awaited album `Blue Funk` is set for release in the distant future.

J. Geils

Energised R&B driven by the `Wolfman Jack` type vocals of ex-art student and disc jockey Peter Wolf and the screaming mouth-iron, courtesy of Magic Dick. This band of Americanos started life in `67 by Wolf and drummer Steven Bladd. The rest of the band – Danny Klein (bass), Seth Justman (keyboards), J. Geils (guitar) and Magic Dick Salwitz were picked up from a technical engineering college. They started out as a gritty, down to earth boogie band. Their last two albums (`Ladies Invited` and `Nightmares` – on the Atlantic label) were a little more sophisticated. Still a premier live act.

Geordie

Brash Newcastle band, formed in early 1972. Powerful stage act, had some success with the singles `Don`t Do That` and `All Because Of You` – the latter a blatant rip-off of all (at that time) current singles styles, notably Bolan`s `Solid Gold Easy Action`, but great fun all the same. Toured with Slade, have made two albums, `Hope You Like It` and `Don`t Be Fooled By The Name`. Line-up: Brian Johnson vocals, Vic Malcolm guitar, Tom Hill bass, Brian Gibson drums.

Golden Earring

Dutch band, guitarist George Kooymans formed it in 1965 as a bubblegum outfit. Gradually became influenced by early Sixties styles and developed into musically excellent, visually superb band but without much originality. They first came to Britain in 1973 in the wake of Focus` success and soon notched up a hit single, `Radar Love`, and an album, `Moontan`. Current efforts, `Kill Me (Ce Soir)` and `Switch` are disappointing – the band seem to have become too preoccupied with their flashy image.

Groundhogs

The archetypal heavy rock three piece, the Groundhogs originally derived their familiar sound in `68. They were a four piece blues band, but after the departure of vocalist Stephen Rye, Tony McPhee took over and in 1970, two albums later, they established their niche with `Thank Christ For The Bomb` which with the followup `Split` could be described as their definitive product. The moody hard edged sound of the band along with Tony McPhee`s sad sounding `droney` vocals made this mob a popular gigging band. In 1972 after the release of `Who Will Save The World`, drummer Ken Pusteinik left to be replaced by ex-Egg drummer Clive Brooks. This is when McPhee`s guitar and songwriting completely took over and after `Hogwash` he recorded a solo album in 1973 – `The Two Sides Of Tony `T.S.` McPhee`.

Grand Funk

Detroit punk rock at 14,000 watts. GFR were the first of the Teeny bop heavy rock gladiators. Originally put together by ex-Detroit disc jockey Terry Knight in late `69, Don Brewer (drums) and Mark Farner (guitar) were formerly from his backing band the Pack. They got Mel Scacher from Question Mark & The Mysterians. Funk went straight to the open air festivals, their main assets being volume and energy, and soon captured the hearts of a new generation of kids. The band suddenly became a monster (their fifth album `Survival` sold a million on the day of release) they became a liberated status symbol to the masses of teenagers who weren`t interested in The Cream or the Beatles. The band had produced their own album `Phoenix` after splitting from Knight and in fact rose back from the ashes and back into the charts. They added ex-Pack organist Craig Frost to their line up and their next two albums were produced by whiz kid Todd Rundgren.

Gun, Three Man Army, Baker-Gurvitz Army

Lots of Gurvitz brothers for your money. `Polecat Woman` is about the best thing they`ve done and is available on `Three Man Army Two`. The B-G Army sound promising.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frank Zappa, Gladys Knight, Women In Rock, Betty Wright, Steve Harley, Peter Frampton, Labelle, Peter Skellern, Ray Davies, Larry Uttal, Chris Spedding, Anne Murray, Sweet Sensation, Bernard Purdie, Mike Harding, Ronnie Lane, Yes.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT The A-Z of Heavy Metal FROM SOUNDS (Part 2), April 26, 1975

Here I continue what I started in my last post. Hope you enjoy it. These are the bands that mattered in 1975 when they spoke about “heavy metal”. I guess most people don`t call many of these bands “metal” in 2019.
Read on!

IMG_2731

Rock from `eavy to `umble or
The Sounds A – Z of Heavy Metal

Compiled by Pete Makowski and Geoff Barton

B

Babe Ruth

`Eek! `Screech!` Closely followed by a dull `clung!`

Bachman Turner Overdrive

Heavy Duty Rock. It all started when Randy Bachman left top selling Canadian band Guess Who. He wrote their hits (e.g `American Woman`) and eventually decided to try his hand at solo albums and producing. He got together with another ex-Guess Who member Chad Allen and his brother Rob Bachman to record an album `Brave Belt`. Reprise were interested in the product but wanted a band to go on the road and sell it. So C. F. Turner was added on bass to complete a roadworthy line up. Allen dropped out of the band before the release of the Belt`s second album, another Bachman, Timmy, joined on guitar. They recorded their third album and left Reprise to join Mercury, Brave Belt III became Bachman Turner Overdrive. After two moderately successful albums Timmy left to produce and was replaced by Great Vancouver guitarist Blair Thornton. Things began happening and by the time of the release of their third album – `Not Fragile` – they were big business. Their popularity has even spread here (You Ain`t Seen Nothin` Yet`, `Roll Down The Highway`). Their music combines all the excitement of the world`s leading rock bands, packaged neatly into one tight commercial bundle.

Bad Company

Probably one of today`s most popular `commercial` rock and roll bands. They`ve hit the jackpot from the start with their single `Can`t Get Enough Of Your Love` and album `Bad Co` and second time round their album `Straight Shooter` is selling well. Stable mates to those `eavy boys Zeppelin, Bad Co is half of Free, Paul Rodgers (vocals) and Simon Kirke (drums) – the others Paul Kossoff (unemployed) and Andy Fraser (new band just formed) – plus Mick Ralphs (guitar) ex-Mott, and former King Crimson bassist Boz Burrell.

Jeff Beck

Beck can be as vicious as the heftiest of metallurgists, soft as a pigeon`s tail feather, depending on his mood, or his band, of the moment. Compare `Cause We`ve Ended Now As Lovers` with the savagery of his playing on the likes of `Plynth` (on Cosa Nostra Beck-Ola`) and see what I mean. Neither the Yardbirds (in which Beck replaced Eric Clapton) nor the brilliant Beck Group with Stewart, Wood and Waller was exactly heavy metal, but both were vital influences on the bands that made up the first division, first generation of the emerging muscular metal groups. Beck later joined Beck, Bogert, Appice, and joined the ranks of those who had followed on the lead of the old Beck bands. As usual, the results were sometimes spectacular, sometimes very ordinary. Beck quickly outgrew his desire to out-heavy the opposition, and moved on to more melodic and intricate music.

Bedlam

`Is Bedlam the new Cream` asked one music paper, well not quite, but Bedlam did revive a thrashing rock sound that was reminiscent of the late Sixties into a 70s package – a definite British sound that never quite made it. The band was formed by ex-Jeff Beck drummer Cozy Powell who along with Dave Ball (guitar), his brother Dennis (bass) and singer Frank Aiello produced one album.

Black Oak Arkansas

The blond and bleached Jim Dandy Mangrum and Arkansan cohorts are the epitome of American raunch and roll. The band started about 13 years ago when they acquired their first bits of equipment from local schools, `they just got off probation a couple of years ago. Their success is the result of solid roadwork and an exciting live performance. On record they seem to lack that certain je-ne-sais-quoi. Their new guitarist, 20 year old So` Bean, could put a change to that.

Black Sabbath

Highly popular, originally black magic, now big league metal band, Sabbath are currently slightly more mature in approach than they were say, with their first three albums. `Warning` a track on their first album produced by Roger Bain is definitely recommended. Had a hit with `Paranoid`. Currently hibernating.

Black Widow

Came out at the same time as Black Sabbath but never quite made it. Their music was in the same genre and they took the whole Black Magic thing one step further by culminating the show with a mock sacrifice featuring chief witch Alex Sanders and his wife. Got a lot of scandal press coverage.

Blue Cheer

Probably the closest thing to a critic`s idea of a Heavy Metal band. This powerhouse trio were an American interpretation of the Cream and the Yardbirds? Their weapon was volume, energy and simplicity and in `67 they pioneered a style which has remained with us ever since. Their rendition of Cochran`s `Summertime Blues` was a Heavy Metal anthem, a classic, those bombastic powerchords, throbbing bass blues and battering percussion sent the message home. The original line up featured Paul Whaley (drums), Dick Peterson (bass) and Leigh Stephens (guitar). Stephens left the band to record some solo albums and was replaced by Randy Holden, this also marked the end of the band for most people. They never bettered their first two efforts `Vincibus Eruptium` and `Outside Inside`.

Blue Oyster Cult

Probably the most competent of recent American heavy bands. Undeniably derivative, the B. O`Cult are nevertheless great fun. Surrealist lyrics and Buck Dharma`s sizzling guitar are the two things that strike you immediately. Their current `On Your Feet Or On Your Knees` double album is the best live rock effort for years.

Edgar Broughton Band

From the Midlands, and regarded as outcasts even in their family life, `Them Broughtons` started a rock and roll band. They got famous for benefits and free gigs, for the People`s Music, for endless versions of tunes like `Out Demons Out` and `Freedom`, and they gathered an audience that included some of the most loyal and relentless head-shakers and shoulder-joggers known to the British concert hall. In some ways they were close to the Third World War kind of thing – Preachin` revolution if not violence – and they`ve had their share of busts and court cases. These days they`re more into mime and theatre than the star right heads – down – and – people`s – boogie number but the WEEMEENIT set is still strong and faithful.

Brownsville Station

“We`re just aiming for that great E chord in the sky”, says the Station`s outspoken guitarist / vocalist Cub Koda. It seems this bombshell trio found it. Their music is raucous punk rock, tight, jam-free. They scored with their teenage anthem `Smoking In The Boys Room` which also sold well here. Henry `H-Bomb` Weck (drums) and Michael Lutz (bass) completed the trio. So far they`ve had two hit albums in the States – `Yeah` and `School Punks`.

Budgie

Loud three-piece Welsh band, first formed in 1968 when bassist Burke Shelley met one-time drummer Ray Phillips in a record shop. Their first album, released in July 1971, was produced by Roger Bain. Guitarist Tony Bourge pumps out a good bludgeoning riff, their numbers `Breadfan` and `Whisky River` are as good metal as you`ll hear anywhere. Phillips (now in a band called Woman) was replaced by Pete Boot (who has since joined Sweaty Betty) and the band`s current drummer is a guy called Steve Williams. Their fourth album `In For The Kill` just made the album charts last year. Their repertoire also includes numbers with eccentric titles: `Nude Disintegrating Parachutist Woman`, `A Crash Course In Brain Surgery` for example. Great stuff.

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CREAM 

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Cactus

Beck, Bogert and Appice without Beck? Cactus were probably what Tim Bogert and Carmine Appice got together to flex their muscles before the formation of BB&A. Featuring Rusty Day (vocals), Jim McCarthy (guitar), they released three albums in this form between 1970 and 1972 then split. Another Cactus without the original core of the band (ie Appice and Bogert) appeared on the scene, which seemed a pointless excercise.

Climax Chicago

Out of the blues boom came a thousand bands, each one aping the city blues of America and few of them making big waves. Foghat were one (see below) and the Climax Chicago Blues Band, with the influences inherent in the name, were another. They played a lot here around 69/70, didn`t get very far, and eventually made a more than respectable living in America – easing off the blues pedal and doing that boogie-metal thing a bit more. Hence they dropped the `Blues Band` tag. It`s a familiar story.

Alice Cooper

Shockrock. The name was enough to confuse people. When Alice Cooper (alias Vincent Furnier) and his Detroit cronies (Glen Buxton, guitar, Michael Bruce, guitar, Dennis Dunaway, bass and Neal Smith, drums) appeared on the scene, no one was ready. They were so unpopular that their mass dejection inspired Frank Zappa to sign them onto his label – Straight. They released two albums, `Pretties For You` and `Easy Action` in `69, and they bombed miserably. It wasn`t until the band moved to Warners that they got the visuals of their act and the music together, this resulted with the classic `Love It To Death` album in `71, followed by US hit single `I`m Eighteen` which was proclaimed a contemporary to `My Generation`. Their show progressed from mere hangings to simulated mutilations as the years progressed, their music became more theatrical. They scored in this country with `School`s Out` in `72, followed by `Elected`. The band peaked with `Billion Dollar Babies` in `73 and retired from touring, and a year later they released `Muscle Of Love` which was the first album to receive mass appraisal on a musical level by the press. Again they remained static for a year, Cooper has returned with Lou Reed`s former band backing him and a new album and show (`Welcome To My Nightmare`). The rest of the original band, whose future with Cooper is still not definite, are in the process of recording solo ventures. Cooper`s antics have lost their initial controversial appeal. Although it`s equally theatrical, somehow it seems oddly normal in this day and age.

Cream

They came along at just the right time, they were (almost) the first, and they were magnificent. Three musicians from jazz, rock and R&B backgrounds who called themselves, and were, the Cream – the first genuine `supergroup`. In 1966 they came wailing out of nowhere with Jack Bruce howling `I Feel Free` and Eric Clapton doing things on the fretboard that most people figured was sleight of hand, while Ginger Baker`s restrained thunder provided an indespensable bottom. All of a sudden those twelve bar clichès were as viable as yesterday`s papers, and everyone craned their necks to see how long Cream could fly. It was 1966 the dawn of Flower-Power, `Revolver` had warped a good few minds and paved the way for further psychedelic excess, San Francisco was the new Liverpool, and Dylan had disappeared, for the time being at least. An audience and a generation of performers had grown through pop and wanted something more challenging. Cream gave it them in no uncertain terms. At the critical moment when pop was beginning to take itself seriously and call itself rock, along came three musical colossi, as it then seemed, who asserted without need of proof that you could play rock with all the passion and technical skill of any other music, and still create riotous excitement. Hendrix as an instrumentalist and Pete Townshend, for a while, were the only other people even in the running. Clapton, a blues purist until Hendrix opened his ears to flash and pyrotechnics, blossomed in Cream: on the old blues classics he wrought wondrous changes, and on Brown and Bruce`s originals he positively went into orbit. Bruce had a fluid lyrical bass style and a voice like a chilling gale. Baker, in the best performances he has given before or since, could even make a cowbell speak. `Fresh Cream` their first album, and the electrifying impact of their live performances revolutionised rock. They set the trend for extended soloing, which is fully explored in the live half of their double album `Wheels Of Fire`. A second album `Disraeli Gears` had appeared meanwhile containing classics such as the haunting `Strange Brew` and `Tales Of Brave Ulysses`. Tours of Britain and America followed and unanimous critical and commercial success. Then in 1969 always plagued by internal dissent, they broke up; Clapton to go to the abortive Blind Faith and then solo. Baker also to Blind Faith, then his ill-fated Airforce, and Africa for a long while before returning with the Baker-Gurvitz Army: Jack Bruce to various jazz outfits, and solo work again with poet Pete Brown`s lyrics, before a brief spell with Mountain`s Leslie West and Corky Laing, and now of course his new group with Carla Bley and Mick Taylor. For a while the Cream mantle fell upon Mountain who ploughed the Cream furrow until it was a highway. But Mountain were not alone; Cream made changes in rock that ensured it would never be the same again.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frank Zappa, Gladys Knight, Women In Rock, Betty Wright, Steve Harley, Peter Frampton, Labelle, Peter Skellern, Ray Davies, Larry Uttal, Chris Spedding, Anne Murray, Sweet Sensation, Bernard Purdie, Mike Harding, Ronnie Lane, Yes.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT The A-Z of Heavy Metal FROM SOUNDS, April 26, 1975

This is a really fun one. It is also sort of a long article, so I will have to split it up in several parts.
Unfortunately I don`t have the next Sounds paper, so this will end a little bit out in the letter N.
Whatever – it is great fun to read these early impressions of this genre of music by two music journalists that have made a lifelong career out of writing about these kind of bands. Kudos to them both!
Read on!

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Rock from `eavy to `umble or
The Sounds A – Z of Heavy Metal

Foreward by Mike Flood Page

Compiled by Pete Makowski and Geoff Barton

Rolling Stone took a page and a half and still wasn`t sure, NME took eight lines and got as close to the truth, and Pete Makowski says however I do it he`ll disagree with my definition of Heavy Metal.
Besides if you want to damn someone these days, and induce cries of `Boring!` from those SOUNDS staff sober enough to yell, you`ll accuse them of being a Heavy Metal band. Visions of subhuman monsters with but one chord and a grunt between them, and enough amplification to project their sound half-way round the globe are summoned swiftly to mind. One thing is sure, nobody can agree on a definition of Heavy Metal.
What follows is of necessity an individual view. After only a few broken limbs and life-long friendships sundered we at SOUNDS settled upon the bands that we list below. At further risk to my own health, I will now set out a personal definition, and pass it to the subs before Makowski gets back from the boozer.
There isn`t even any agreement on where it all began: Pete Townshend dates his own initiation into the possibillities of the electrified guitar to the first time he heard Link Wray`s solo on `Rumble` in 1958; but there are those who will point out that Les Paul first plugged a pick-up onto his guitar sometime around 1935; and there again, claims have been made for practioners of electrified guitar existing here and there in the 1920s. Besides Pete Makowski probably thinks Rock and Roll started with Grand Funk, and Steve Peacock probably thinks Hank Marvin invented the tremelo arm. You can`t please them all.
What is certain is that by the 1950s the electric guitar had been perfected as a popular instrument by blues performers like T-Bone Walker to the point that it was ready and primed, and branded as a dangerous weapon when the first rock and rollers picked it up. From there on it developed gradually until the early 60s when a new generation of British blues guitarists, weaned on rock and roll and turning towards the blues to find something more valid than the brylcreem pap of that era, burst onto the scene.

They had grown up accepting the electric guitar, had marvelled at the echo chamber and the tremelo arm, and they began to take everything a little further. Clapton, Beck and Page – the three linchpins of the movement – all belonged at various times to the Yardbirds, and all were virtuosi. The debate still rages as to who exactly used a wah-wah pedal first, it hardly matters now. But the seeds of the later onslaught on the senses had begun.
For the crucial elements of Heavy Metal – though no band may have all of them – are these: 1) a grounding in the blues which graduates of the British Blues Boom had in abundance, which yielded the characteristic basic riff; 2) a soloist: no matter that by the time of Iron Butterfly`s `In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida` that soloist had only two notes to play. This idea became fashionable with the rise of a self-consciously `artistic` pop music in the mid-60s when Hendrix took wing and Cream arrived. Clapton has subsequently said that Hendrix opened his eyes to the possibilities of the guitar. Until he saw Hendrix play he had been a blues purist, but he reasoned if a black guy could get away with that, then what was he deliberately restricting himself for?
As is well known lesser imaginations seized upon the fifteen minute solo as an excuse to hide their inability to write enough good songs to last out a set and gave the whole thing a bad name, but not before the likes of Clapton and Hendrix had shown to what heights a guitar could soar.
3) Sheer bloody volume! It is said that a small dog unfortunate enough to wander too close to Blue Cheer`s speakers was killed instantly. “Past the pain threshold!” threatened to become the slogan of the Heavy Metal merchants in the late 60s. That they could do this was down to the rapid technological innovations of Jim Marshall, Mr Watkins and many more nameless inventors who found that as fast as they could add another stack of speakers or a fuzz-box or a few more switches and synthis to feed the guitar through some kid would find a way to use them. Reverb, feedback and a whole battery of technical effects come in here.

4) Energy: not to be confused with volume, it is an indefinable quality which can penetrate to the mind of the most doped-out, wiped-out, deranged teenager and have him (or her; mainly him) up on his feet yelling for more, and preferably tearing up the first three rows of seats as well. This often explains why some of the best exponents of the genre are constantly better live than on record.
Of course in its pristine form it couldn`t last. Nothing good ever does; so as we enter the second half of the 1970s Heavy Metal, which for sheer sonic atrocity makes the outrage of the 1950s rock and roller look more like Stone Age by comparison, has begun to break down several different ways. There always was a twofold split in Heavy Metal between the basic pounding beat which gave it its simple appeal, and the technical prowess of some of its best soloists. As it became clear that most guitarists hadn`t three minutes worth of original ideas, let alone fifteen, many bands took the easy option and cut down on improvisation to concentrate on boogie.
You know who I mean.
Others took technical sophistication to its logical extreme so as well as Black Sabbath we have John McLaughlin; for every Grand Funk there is a Carlos Santana. That`s about it, except I forgot the vocals: at their best as in the searing voice of a Robert Plant they recall the old blues shouting tradition taken into the space age; at their worst they are best forgotten.
Uh, oh… here comes Makowski again, I`m off…

A

Aerosmith

Rhinestone rock and roll. Aerosmith look like the New York Dolls and play like rock and roll demons. They were formed in 1970 featuring Joe Perry (guitar), Tom Hamilton (bass), ex-drummer Steve Tyler (vocals), Joey Kramer (drums) and Brad Whitford (guitar). Tyler plus the twin spearheads of the guitars are the main focal point of this US outfit and they have achieved moderate success in the States with their two CBS albums – `Aerosmith` and `Get Your Wings Off`.

The Amboy Dukes

Who plays 150 nights a year to millions of fans? Who is able to break glass with a single note? Who is the king of feedback guitar? Why Ted Nugent of course. He and his merry bunch of Amboy Dukes have been causing havoc in America since 1965. In fact they were probably the most progressive rock band in the late Sixties with well arranged toons n` all. Now they have returned as a metallic three piece, nothing special, just loud and energetic with two albums on Zappa`s label Discrete (`Call Of The Wild` and `Tooth Fang And Claw`) Nugent – the outrageous guitar leader of the band – is still challenging everyone to a duel.

Amon Duul II

Rootless, bizarre German band, often freaky, create a crashing, eccentric wall of sound. The original Amon Duul was (more or less) a studio group that came together once a year in a studio and then broke up again. Anxious to make Duul a more permanent concern, two guys called Chris Karrer and John Weinzierl brought about the formation of II. The band have preoccupation with Lemmings (there`s a compilation album, `Lemmingmania`, currently available on UA), nonsensical lyrics, weird album covers and, more notably, tripped-out song titles: `Flesh-Coloured Anti-Aircraft Alarm`, `Hallucination Guillotine` for example. Even their wailing female vocalist is called Renate Knaup-Krotenschwantz, and you can`t say fairer than that.

Atomic Rooster

Formed when Vincent Crane and Carl Palmer left the amazing Crazy World of Arthur Brown. Palmer soon left – the first of numerous changes, but with the arrival of guitarist John Cann, Rooster had two successive hits in 1970, with a good extension of the Crazy World organ-based sound. More upheavals followed `Tomorrow Night` and `Devil`s Answer`, but through all the changes, most notably singer Chris Farlowe including a label switch from B&C to Pye, Rooster, still based around Crane, failed to recapture their early popularity.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frank Zappa, Gladys Knight, Women In Rock, Betty Wright, Steve Harley, Peter Frampton, Labelle, Peter Skellern, Ray Davies, Larry Uttal, Chris Spedding, Anne Murray, Sweet Sensation, Bernard Purdie, Mike Harding, Ronnie Lane, Yes.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT “The cost of rock” FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

At the time of posting this it is Easter. A very special time for a lot of Christians and a very happy time for those of us who may be sinners and don`t believe, as we have some time off work for a few days. To celebrate I give you a very special article where we learn a bit about the economy behind touring in the early 70s. I have tried to make it as informative as possible by having the equivalent price in todays money value (2018) in brackets beside the prices given. I hope you find it interesting.

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Where will it all end?

In this, Geoff Barton looks closely at the financial side of putting a band on the road.

Now that a crisp new copy of SOUNDS costs you 10p(£1,15), Mars bars set you back 6p and the price of petrol has risen to God knows how much per measly gallon, it`s hardly surprising to see ticket prices spiralling steadily upwards along with everything else.
These days 50p(£5,75) makes for a cheap gig, and if you`re lucky enough to get two good bands for that price, then it`s something of a bargain. I suppose it`s fair to quote £2(£23) as an average price to pay to see a reasonably big band – although many think that the advent of the £5(£57,50) ticket is not that far away.
Be that as it may, people were recently willing to pay £3.50(£34,50) for a super-cramped Wembley supergig – not even the most fervent CSN&Y fan could call that value for money. Or maybe he could – after all, the eternal inflationary black market ticket racket thrives on the poor fans who will pay just about any price to see their heroes, whoever they may be.
But don`t think I`m putting the 70,000-odd Wembley concert goers down. I remember I was equally willing to queue for seven hours, for the most part squashed up against a brick wall, to pay £4.40(£46) for two plots of carpet to see a rather duff Who gig at London`s Lyceum. Dreadful.
I guess we all reckon that we`ve been ripped off at one time or another and, theoretically, it should never happen. But, of course, it does – and all too frequently.
If you`ve ever felt particularly hard done by, your natural recourse is to blame the band in question. But touring is a complex venture all the way down the line, and a hell of a lot more people other than the bands are involved.
You`ve got promoters, roadies, stage managers, social secretaries or whatever. They`ve all got to come out on top, with their heads above water. Yeah… a complex venture. You pay the price, you see the band, but just where does all your money go?

If anything goes wrong during the process of setting up a gig, the promoter will feel the brunt of it first and foremost. He has to pay the rental costs for a hall, which naturally varies from place to place; he has to finance the printing of posters and maybe advertise in the papers; he has to pay any staff he employs, and so on and so on. Getting a concert together is a risky business and about a third of the price on your creased up ticket goes to the promoter. Hopefully he makes a profit somewhere.
Then there`s eight per cent VAT on the ticket, and some box office commission probably has to come out of it as well. The rest goes to the band.
Simple enough? Oh no, it doesn`t stop there.
Take Gallagher And Lyle, for example. They`ve just completed a nationwide tour with support act, comedian and 14 piece orchestra – a four hour show in all, which they financed themselves to the tune of a cool £15,000 (£172,500). “The costs were collossal” said an undaunted Berry Gallagher. “Out of an initial outlay of of £15,000 we got about £3,000 (£34,500) back. We`re quite pleased.”
Gallagher And Lyle insisted on a maximum price of £1 (£11.50) for all the dates. That`s a good gesture, but on the face of it they lost a lot of money. Why did you do it, Benny?
“It was just to promote our album. Sure, we lost a lot, but it was worthwhile because our album sales doubled.”
The cheapo-cheapo G&L roadshow was probably an exception to the traditional touring rule, if there is such a thing. The band`s fee varies from £750 (£8625) to £1,000 (£11,500) so they obviously couldn`t hope to break even, let alone show a profit. Just look at these figures: there were 29 people on the road, and hotel bills came to £3,500 (£40,250); wages for the orchestra alone came to £5,000 (£57,500); and the costs of hiring a three ton lorry and a 41 seater coach amounted to £1,500 (£17,250). It makes your £1 ticket stub seem rather insignificant, doesn`t it?

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Benny: “The main thing is to give everyone a good quality concert. If it`s cheap too, all well and good. But I don`t see the value behind groups charging outrageous prices. It`s crazy. Naturally, the band must be very good to be able to charge a large sum – but I wouldn`t pay their price. They can`t be that good.”
Gallagher And Lyle plan to tour again in late December or the New Year, this time charging about £1.50 (£17,25) a gig. Benny: “It`s about time we made some money.”
So that`s where your money goes. Well, some of it at least. The Gallagher And Lyle tour was, admittedly, an extreme and hardly characteristic case. But at least it gives you some idea as to the vast amount of money wrapped up in a band on the road.
10cc currently have a more conventional stage show, and their manager Rick Dixon was at first a bit dubious about participating in a sort of band breakdown, for tax reasons. But eventually 10cc`s financial secrets were revealed.
10cc have been on the road for about a year now, and Rick thinks that when it comes round to assessing the band`s situation, money-wise, they`re going to be very much in the red. Still, during that year 10cc have risen in stature and popularity and can now command an, on the surface, substantial fee of £1,000 per gig. The band have six people in their road crew – a sound engineer, three equipment guys and two to deal with the lighting. They run three vehicles – two for equipment and lighting which they hire and one, a Mercedes limo, which they own themselves and travel in.

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“We used to own a Mercedes van,” says Rick, “but as the band got bigger and the PA got bigger it became inadequate for our needs. We didn`t buy a new one but decided to start hiring. It worked out for us as a very good deal. Hiring is a better proposition. If we owned trucks they`d be written off within three years anyway. The hire company is responsible for their vehicle – if the engine falls out it`s their lookout, not ours.”
At the moment 10cc charge around £1,25 (£14.38) per ticket per gig, and through Rick`s own admittance they`re businessmen in part: “If we know we`re going to fill a place, we go for a higher price.”
Out of the band`s average fee of £1,000, £750 has been spent even before they get out on to the stage: “the £1,000 has to cover road crew wages; hotel bills; petrol for three vehicles; the purchase price of one vehicle; the depreciation of vehicles, equipment, etcetera; publicity; miscellaneous expenses…” The list is almost endless. Oh yeah – the band have to earn a living out of all that as well.
Rick: “I`m sure there are easier ways to live. If we weren`t slightly crazy and very dedicated we`d never be doing this at all. People think we lead an easy life, but I tell you it`s not much fun leaving home at 9 a.m. and getting back at 4 a.m. the next day.”
So, when you buy your ticket you`re not just paying to see a band, but you`re directly paying for many other things besides. The next time you pay to see a gig and complain about the price of the ticket, just think about it for a while. Is the price you`re paying all that much out of the way?
Rick: “It`s been the same for a long, long time – no-one has it as good as British concert-goers. In Holland you pay maybe £15 (£172.50) to see Shirley Bassey, and when 10cc played Copenhagen the tickets were £5 (£57.50) each.”
And will we eventually be paying these prices? “It`s a question of politics, a higher standard of living, world prices, what have you. If Britain is to attain a standard of living comparable to that of the rest of the EEC we must pay the price.
“Pop music is a business, like anything else. Petrol costs more, vehicles cost more, insurance costs more, electricity costs more, everything costs more. Someone somewhere has to pay for it all and, as always, it`s usually the consumer.”
A depressing picture, to be sure. Meanwhile, Bowie talks about charging £8 (£92) per seat for a British “theatour”, and I dare say we`ll willingly pay that much if he comes over. But it`s got to end somewhere. It can`t go on forever. Can it?

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pink Floyd, Pete Brown, George Harrison, Roger Glover, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, Bad Company, Phil Spector, Thin Lizzy, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.