ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM SOUNDS, August 21, 1971

A short article on Purple and a little bit about The Faces. Not the greatest piece of journalism but it is always nice to read anything written about bands this early in their career. And these days, when we do miss the great, late Jon Lord, it is a pleasure to “hear” from him again. So enjoy, my friends.

IMG_0948

A purple passage in Texas

Allan McDougall reports from Hollywood on Deep Purple in America

It`s 3 P.M. on a 95 degree Hollywood Friday afternoon, and you`re sitting high in your office thinking Friday thoughts of the beach, or the mountains or maybe the desert. Your intercom buzzes and your secretary says there`s a Jon Lord at the gate, should the guard let him in?
Then you remember tonight is the night to go down to Long Beach. Not to tour the Queen Mary, all high and dry and hamburger and cake stands, but to see Jon Lord and his organ and Ritchie and Roger and Little Ian and singer Ian who are gigging at L.B. with Rod Stewart and the very big now Faces.
You run out and meet Jon and say, “Far out, didn`t think you`d have time to fall by, watcha up to?” And Jon, as elegant as ever in his Avis renta-thing says, “I came in early to buy an organ – bloody airlines dropped mine.”
But first: liquid refreshment. Which in 95 deg. Hollywood means not the boozer because (A) there`s no pubs in L.A., really, and (B) imagine the kind of hangover you`d get in that kind of heat.

TOUR

So, sitting sipping our strawberry malts, Jon tells us about this tour of America:
“Actually, it been the best tour Deep Purple have done of the States. The most worthwhile so far. Gigging with The Faces has been so good. You know, obviously in most places we`ve played it`s been their audiences – Especially in Detroit and Chicago, which is where Rod Stewart`s label, Mercury, is headquartered.

ENCORES

“But in Texas, it seemed like they`d all come to see Deep Purple. Anyway, we usually had to work very hard to get the audiences going, and always got encores – which meant that The Faces also had to work especially hard to follow us. All of which meant a lot of fun for the audiences at every show.”
Knowing that Ritchie Blackmore is not quite the world`s No. 1 America fan, we ask if the man in black is digging it?
“Yes, Ritchie`s really getting into it at last, bless him. Now, he can see the sense of it – we all can. Did you know that our new album, `Fireball`, shipped 55,000 in the last three days?”
We pause to faint for a minute, because that`s a whole lot of albums for 3 days, and we think that all the signs that told us “At last Deep Purple are going to really do it in the States”, all those signs spoke with straight tongue.
“And there`s re-orders coming into Warner`s from all over the place,” Jon smilingly concludes.

JAMS

Later that day my lady and I drive down to Long Beach, but the traffic jams caused by the 20,000-odd people with tickets (and the 10,000-odd ticketless people) all trying to get in make us late for the show, and we get there at the end of “Strange Kind Of Woman” which goes down well.
Then Purple sneak into “Child In Time” which really gets the audience going. Having seen Purple perform in Paris and Berlin and London last year, we observe one big change in the act, and a nice one, too. Ritchie does an incredible solo where his guitar sounds like some monstrous cello.
Then comes the usual closer, “Mandrake Root”, great as ever with the strobe-lights and all, and the audience go crazy and Deep Purple should be very proud and happy.

EFFECTIVE

A word or two about those Faces: they are fantastic. Rod was just great, prancing around in his leopard-skin suit and while Mac and Ron and Ronnie and Kenny may not be the world`s flashiest musicians, they probably are the world`s most effective.

BOPPING

From “It`s All Over Now” to “Maybe I`m Amazed” to the Everly`s “When Will I Be Loved”, through old favourite “Country Comforts” and “Every Picture Tells A Story” new favourites “Maggie May”, they had the entire audience bopping happily at their feet.
And that was the best rock show South California`s seen in some years.

IMG_0960

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ravi Shankar, Mickey Finn, Roger McGuinn, Rick Nelson, Howard Riley, Eddie Harris, Mike Albuquerque, Supertramp, Mark/Almond, East of Eden, Woody Allen, The R&B Show, Terry Reid, Viv Stanshall, Louis Armstrong, Joseph Spence.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

Advertisements

ARTICLE ABOUT Supertramp FROM SOUNDS, August 21, 1971

A really good article from “ancient” times this one. Even Paul Kossoff, formerly of Free, shows up in it. Have a nice read everyone!

IMG_0948

Changing the face of Supertramp

By Ray Telford

The trouble with most groups nowadays is that none of them seem to think any further than what is expected of them. Fourteen months ago Supertramp was an exception to that because they brought out one of the finest British rock albums of last year and with a kind of unspoken promise it seemed as though they might well continue in their good work.
Since then, though, nothing`s happened except for the release of “Indelibly Stamped” a few weeks ago which got a noticeably cooler reception than did their first, “Supertramp”. According to Kevin Currie, the group`s Liverpool drummer, the reason why Supertramp lay virtually dormant for all those months was because of a serious clash of musical ideas.

CHANGES

“Yeah, it just wasn`t happening personally for the group at that time,” he said. “It got so bad that the drummer had a nervous breakdown and at the time of recording the first album everybody hated each other`s guts. Considering all that it came out pretty well. It was a very melancholy kind of thing and the mood of the group fitted the music. That`s why people dug it I think.”
The changes in the group now have been fairly drastic. Frank Farrell replaced Richard Palmer who was lead guitarist – and as Frank plays bass, former bassist Roger Hodgson took over lead. Kevin replaced Bob Miller on drums. The lineup is completed by keyboard player Richard Davies and Dave Winthrop on saxes.
A couple of months ago rumours were flying thick and fast that Paul Kossoff was about to step in and recruit Roger Hodgson for his own group.
“Well, that`s not strictly true,” said Kevin. It`s true that Paul was interested in the group and in Roger, but Roger flatly said he didn`t want to leave. We all really dug Free and Paul came down to the country and had a blow and he played a gig with us but that was it.”
Perhaps it isn`t so prevalent on “Indelibly Stamped” but Kevin says that they are moving towards a much more melodic and positive form of rock and roll which he reckons will come over to their satisfaction on their third album.
“We`re still basically a rock band and we don`t want to change that but there isn`t any one set direction because we have so many ideas and influences which we`ll have to get together. Everyone is more concerned with melody and this album we`re working on now shows exactly where we`re at.”
As their publicity handout truthfully observes it is a minor miracle that Supertramp are still together. Indeed they have a good name and I feel it is this alone which has kept them together more than anything. Their first album gained them a hard core of followers especially on the college circuit but Kevin reasons that that type of audience is a limitation on the group.

LIVE GIGS

“Most of our live gigs have been college dates which means we`re only exposed to people who want to know about us anyway. Recently, though, we`ve played some northern gigs at things like Mecca Ballrooms and really straight sort of clubs and the receptions have been great. These are the kind of people that wouldn`t normally associate themselves with groovy college bands. We`ve still got a good name and even the people who haven`t seen us come along and they expect something good. Yeah, I think they`re getting it too.”

IMG_0947

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ravi Shankar, Mickey Finn, Roger McGuinn, Rick Nelson, Howard Riley, Eddie Harris, Mike Albuquerque, Supertramp, Mark/Almond, East of Eden, Woody Allen, The R&B Show, Terry Reid, Deep Purple, Viv Stanshall, Louis Armstrong, Joseph Spence.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Pink Floyd FROM SOUNDS, August 14, 1971

Another one with the Floyd. A couple of interesting opinions in this one. I recently saw one of the tribute bands, Brit Floyd, in my hometown of Trondheim and I would recommend them as the next best thing to the original band. The interest that there is in tribute bands to Floyd, shows how much we all miss the original band. Great music!

IMG_0910

Floyd – A buzz of interest

By Steve Peacock

There is a body of opinion, not so much in England but more in the rest of Europe and in America, which contends that the Pink Floyd never really did anything to match the things they did when Syd Barrett was with them.
Looking back over their work, and considering that the bulk of Syd`s work with the band was completed before the “Saucerful of Secrets” LP (he played on some tracks, but Dave Gilmour joined the Floyd while they were in the middle of recording that album) it seems a slightly ridiculous contention.
This is not to belittle Syd`s work at all – you only have to listen to that first album and hear things like his “Bike”, or to the two solo albums that he made since leaving the Floyd, to realise that he is an astonishingly original and inventive writer and musician.
And if you ever saw the group play live in the early days with Syd, you`ll know how important a force he was in their music.

FLOOD

But that was then, and I think it is fair to say that – whatever the politics surrounding his departure from the group – if he hadn`t left, we wouldn`t have had a Pink Floyd for as long as we have. It got to the point within the group where Syd and the others just could not work together.
Syd left, the Pink Floyd carried on with Dave Gilmour, and have since been responsible for some of the most exciting and novel pieces of rock music to emerge from the great flood of ideas we`ve experienced during the past five years.
When people talk about the avant-garde of British rock music, whatever that might be, there are always two names that are mentioned; Soft Machine and Pink Floyd. In their separate ways, both have contributed a great deal. They`re not leaders, as such, because that implies that people have picked up on their music and copied it and though you could easily point to a thousand Mayall imitators, or Cream imitators, you`d be hard put to it to find more than a handful of groups who have borrowed in such an obvious way from the Soft Machine or the Floyd.
They have had their influence though – mainly by opening doors and expressing broad ideas that other musicians have absorbed into their attitudes more than their musical form.
One of the oddest things about the Floyd is that, after “Saucerful of Secrets”, it is difficult to find any kind of logical development in their music. Obviously there is progression from one musical idea to the next, but it isn`t in any clearly defined “direction”, and after listening to their most recent work you don`t really have any idea what they are likely to do next.

ENDLESS

Each album – in some cases each track – is a project on its own; everything they`ve done had been unmistakably Pink Floyd, but everything fits into a general idea rather than a pattern.
Who could have seen “Atom Heart Mother” after the “Ummagumma” album, or “Alan`s Psychedelic Breakfast” on the same album as “Atom Heart”? Not me, and I suspect not the Pink Floyd.
They are all notoriously vague when answering questions about what they are going to do in the future, or even what they are doing at any given time, and they tend to work very slowly – trying out a lot of ideas before they make a decision on what to carry right through.
The list of projects that get postponed, or half finished, or dropped because something else came along, is endless.
But one thing is always certain; when they come up with something it is usually excellent, and it always creates a loud buzz of interest.

Equipment

PA:
6 100 Watt Hiwatt Amps
17 100 Watt WEM Amps
1 40 Watt WEM Amp
1 Leslie 145 Speaker
4 WEM 2 x 15 Speakers
8 WEM 4 x 12 Speakers
11 WEM 4 x 12 Speaker Columns
8 WEM 2 x 15 Speaker Columns
4 WEM Horn Units
2 WEM Mixers
5 Binson Echo Units
1 WEM 1 x 12 Speaker Cabinet
4 3 x 10 WEM Speaker Columns
2 Leslie 147 Speakers
2 WEM Horns
4 Tannoy Speakers
1 H.H. Electronic 100 Watt Amp
1 Leslie Amp

MICROPHONES:
6 Sennheiser Microphones
12 Shure Microphones
12 Microphone Stands

GUITARS:
2 Fender Stratocaster Guitars
2 Fender Precision Bass Guitars

DRUMS:
1 Ludwig Drum Kit with 7 drums and 9 cymbals assorted sizes

ORGAN:
1 Hammond M102 Organ
1 Farfisa Organ Pack

OTHER INSTRUMENTS:
3 Revox Tape Recorders
1 Gong and Stand

IMG_0944

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Alun Davies, Roger McGuinn, Rev. Gary Davis, Judy Collins, Ottilie Patterson, Gentle Giant, Black Sabbath, Moby Grape, Henry McCullough, David Bowie, Marc Bolan, Yes, Family, ELP, Jethro Tull, Grease Band, Osibisa, Strawbs, Led Zeppelin, Mimi Farina.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Led Zeppelin FROM SOUNDS, August 14, 1971

One more in this series where a short article are followed by a detailed equipment list for the band. Hope the cover band artists enjoy this one too.

IMG_0910

From ashes

By Martin Hayman

Led Zeppelin could surely never have foreseen the welter of superlatives that has overwhelmed them since they rose from the ashes of the Yardbirds in 1968. At the time they made their first foray to the U.S. on Boxing Day 1968 to name their debut precisely, the band was a collection of new faces and one of Jimmy Page`s old session playing mates.
In the Yardbirds Page had been somewhat overshadowed by Jeff Beck, whose fame had rapidly advanced in the U.S. with his collaboration with Rod “the Mod” Stewart. Page had taken bass until Beck`s departure and it seemed a bit too good to be true that the struggling Yardbirds could nurture yet another guitarist of comparable brilliance. But as it turned out, it was Page who took the larger slice of dollars and fame, for Page was a guitarist in a band rather than a guitarist with a few sidemen.
Page formed the nucleus of the new band with session drummer John Paul Jones, and eventually took on, independently, two of the former members of Birmingham`s Band of Joy, bassist John Bonham and vocalist Robert Plant. The latter has been one of their strongest assets. Not only could he sing, and sing with phenomenal power and projection, but he seemed to have an instinctive understanding of Page`s guitar pyrotechnics; such a close affinity was there between voice and guitar that at times one wondered whether it could be telepathic. He also had the right face and image, blond, tall, dramatic, obviously English.

DEATH

The combination of a heavy name on guitar and the teen-pulling power of Robert Plant proved a sure-fire combination for the concert-halls of the States. For rather less obvious reasons, Zeppelin never really got off the ground in Britain before they disappeared over the Atlantic.
Perhaps English audiences were still too fixated with the death of Cream and pre-occupied with finding another band who stuck more closely to the blues format. Although Zeppelin very honestly credited blues material to the composers, they only used it as a taking-off point for their own brand of what has appropriately been called thunder rock; nobody can accuse them, however, of not being in complete command of the blues format, as they demonstrate in their compelling rendition of the Howlin` Wolf Classic “How Many More Years?”

STRAIN

Their rise to such dizzy heights has not been without a certain amount of strain from within and backbiting from without, of course. Staunch allies have turned out to be a trifle lukewarm when it became clear that this was a group for everybody to enjoy, and yesterday`s superstars have cooled off on the whole set-up to a marked degree. Plant now feels that he has to hold back a bit to keep from burning himself out: “If you take up the reins that are given you, you end up destroying yourself.”
It was for that reason that the band put together their last album in the country with a mobile recording truck, and produced some pleasantly contrasting acoustic material.
A new album was recorded in February, and delays in mixing should be resolved in the near future.

Equipment

JIMMY PAGE
4 4×12 Marshall speaker cabinets, each have 3 35 watt speakers in each cabinet
2 Hiwatt 100 watt amplifiers, treble booster
2 Vox echoe chambers
1 Echoplex echo chambers
1 Sonie Wave (Therome)
2 Les Paul guitars
1 Rickenbacker 12-string guitar
1 Fender Telecaster
Ernie Ball Super Slinky strings
Vox Wah Wah pedal

JOHN PAUL JONES
Fender jazz bass guitar
Fender Telecaster bass guitar
3 acoustic cabinets
2 acoustic amp tops (pre-amp)
2 Marshall 4×12 horn cabinets = 3 SW speakers
2 Marshall 100 watt amplifiers
1 Farfisa Duo Pro organ
1 Farfisa single manual organ
1 145 Leslie speaker cabinet

JOHN BONHAM
Drums all by Ludwig
1 14 in. x 10 in. side Tom Tom
1 16 in. x 16 in. side Tom Tom
1 18 in. x 16 in. side Tom Tom
2 26 in. x 15 in. bass drums
2 14 in. x 6 1/2 in. snare drums
1 24 in. Ride cymbal
2 20 in. crash cymbals
2 14 in. Hi Hat cymbals

ROBERT PLANT
3000 watt JBL PA system
8 6 ft. x 4 ft. Wuffer speaker cabinets
4 long range horns
4 medium range horns
4 close range horns all with electronic cross-overs
1 Binson echo chamber

All instruments and drums are miked up with Shure Unidine microphones

IMG_0926

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Alun Davies, Roger McGuinn, Rev. Gary Davis, Judy Collins, Ottilie Patterson, Gentle Giant, Black Sabbath, Moby Grape, Henry McCullough, David Bowie, Marc Bolan, Yes, Family, ELP, Jethro Tull, Grease Band, Osibisa, Strawbs, Pink Floyd, Mimi Farina.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT David Bowie FROM SOUNDS, August 14, 1971

At the time of this article, David Bowie had released three albums without too much success. In December of the year 1971 he would release his fourth album, Hunky Dory, his most successful album yet and an album that would be recognised as one of his best. His signature song “Life on Mars?” would feature on the coming album, a song that may be one of music history`s most recognisable among the millions of songs created.
Great work there, Mr. Bowie.

IMG_0910

Confessions of a disillusioned old rocker

By Steve Peacock

In something like rock, which is dominated at the moment by people who are either concerned with gaining respect and recognition for the validity of their intentions or with defining the problems within and around itself, the odd clown doesn`t come amiss. You have to be able to laugh at yourself, and if you don`t there has to be someone around to give you`re pretentions a bop with a purple pig`s bladder – otherwise you never find out which are pretentions and which work.

INSANITY

But the trouble with most of the rock and roll clowns is that they rarely relate too much to rock and roll – like Freddie and the Dreamers, who were basically stand-up comics with music. The Bonzo Dog Band worked, because they mixed their insanity with perfect parody and a sharp insight into the subjects they chose to ridicule; if you heard them doing a blues or something, it was so right that it helped you step back and revalue all those white suburban bands singing about the cottonfields.

INFLUENCED

In a slightly different way, David Bowie works on the same principle. Listening to the tracks he has recorded for his next album and seeing him on stage, you know that he is a writer and performer of considerable skill; but off stage Bowie the person has no illusions.
“I`m not writing very deeply at the moment,” he says as he sits in the opulent surroundings of his manager`s office in Regent Street. “I`m just picking up on what other people say, writing it down, and making songs out of it. I`m not thinking for myself any more, because I decided that everything I write sounds very much like what everybody else writes. So I decided to cut out the middle-man – me – and go straight to the source of what I`m talking about.
“I`d rather retain the position of being a photostat machine with an image, because I think most songwriters are anyway: I don`t think there are many independent-thinking songwriters, they`re all very heavily influenced, far more than in any other form of writing.”

DISPOSABLE

Because it`s such a fast-moving thing? “Because it`s such a disposable medium, that`s why. Because you can say things and if they`re not studied or talked through great analytical study, they`ll survive for a few weeks and seem quite prophetic, and quite studied and deep. That`s the fun of the pop-biz, it`s so un-serious and un-together – an art form of indifference, with no permanent philosophy behind it whatsoever.
“I don`t listen to rock music, you see. I`m not very musical and I find music just a platform for my own fringe lunacies of thought. I think very methodically and very much like anybody else off stage – in quotes – but on stage I just give it the benefit of the doubt and give it everything I`ve got that happens to be tucked away in the recesses of my mind. My songwriting is certainly not an accurate picture of how I think at all.”

ORDINARY

Was there any way he felt he could present such a picture? “It`s not really worth it because I`m incredibly ordinary. I don`t think that people want to pay good, hard-earned, capitalist money to know what I really think. In fact I don`t know why you bother with me when you`ve got John Lennon who is an astounding person – I mean as a guy; possibly the last remaining existentialist that`s around, definitely not a hippy, could possibly be a beatnik. He`s old school, and I adore him because of that, because I`m very influenced by the old school. My brother turned me on to all that – Kerouac and all those – before… before flower-power hit me.” He laughs at the memory.
“You see, I always thought life was wonderful, I didn`t realise everything was so bad until everybody told me. They`re all so serious today.”

LOT OF FUN

So why was he in it at all? “Well I`m not you see, I`m in the very fortunate position where I don`t consider myself in music, so I don`t have to worry about who I compare with or who I`m like, because I`m not like anybody else. So I have a lot of fun just being me. I don`t study it, and I`m not an avid follower of anything much. I never have wanted to consider myself in the rock business too much.”
He feels he`s in a good position, with managers and people who pay his rent and expenses so he can spend time with his wife and child, write songs, make records, and generally mess about doing things that interest him at the time. He wouldn`t say that the idea of dedicating himself to rock music, gigging every night and doing all that bit, appealed to him.

DRUGS

“It must be increasingly obvious,” he says, “that it`s just a road to nowhere. It`s become the new extension of factory work, or no-one joins the army any more, you join a group, and you have roadies that are sergeant-majors and you go out on fatigues to gigs, and wear a uniform. And our Achilles heel is our brainpower, which is practically non-existent, and centres entirely around sex and drugs. I understand it`s very lucrative if you make it.”
Once upon a time, David Bowie was a rock and roll singer. He didn`t much like singing other people`s songs, though he doesn`t mind now, so he started writing his own. So he was a songwriter.
“I suppose I`m a disillusioned old rocker. I`m sure that if I`d made it I would have adored it all – all the gold lame and everything, it would have been fabulous. Then I found myself in a mime company, that made me a clown, and I came out of it a clown/songwriter.”

Bowie

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Alun Davies, Roger McGuinn, Rev. Gary Davis, Judy Collins, Ottilie Patterson, Gentle Giant, Black Sabbath, Moby Grape, Henry McCullough, Marc Bolan, Yes, Led Zeppelin, Family, ELP, Jethro Tull, Grease Band, Osibisa, Strawbs, Pink Floyd, Mimi Farina.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.