1973

ARTICLE ABOUT PFM (Premiata Forneria Marconi) FROM SOUNDS, December 1, 1973

This Italian band deserves a little bit of attention here. If you like prog-rock, do yourself a favour and listen to this band. Not so well-known outside of their homeland these days, but they had a bit of success abroad in the 70s. Nice little band!

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Now for the celebration

By Pete Makowski

Apart from being the name for a first-class patissere in Northern Italy Premiata Forneria Marconi (or, as they`re better known, PFM) it is also the name for a first-class Italian band.
If you remember the launching of the Manticore label you`ll also remember they released a single by this quintet called “Celebration”. The band played a few venues to promote their product but never sunk their teeth into British venues and now they have returned with a tour and will continue where they left off promoting their first album and maybe their single if it is re-released.
I spoke to the band`s flautist, violinist, and vocalist Maura Pagini in the makeshift dressing room at City Poly prior to PFM`s performance there. “We have already written the material for our new album but we are not completely sure of it and will probably debut it in Italy where we`ll feel more confident. We`ll be playing most of our first album which probably hasn`t been heard by most of the people we`re playing to,” said Pagini.
Mauro was pleased with their performance at the Reading Festival although he seemed disgruntled at the time they were given. “We can`t play our best in so short a time because we like to warm up, normally in Italy we play up to three hours, at Reading we only had about forty-five minutes.”
The band are big money spinners in Italy and their Manticore release is actually the second album they`ve made (the first one is only available in Italy) and they are accustomed to playing large auditoriums. The individual musicians have been playing for countless years and have all studied music. Before PFM were formed they did session work and were featured on the majority of Italian hit records. They were “discovered” by another Manticorian Pete Sinfield who translated the lyrics of their album into English and produced their album.

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“I think we`re beginning to master the language,” said Mauro, “we used to prefer singing in Italian, as it`s easier to sing from the heart in your own language. Our next album will have a few English tracks and a few Italian.”
The band`s music runs in the same vein as ELP and Yes, and Mauro thinks that this is the type of music which will be predominant in years to come. “We`re trying to express a new language, I think it has a lot to offer,” although he adds, “I have nothing against rock and roll, I love it, I used to play it, you know I used to be in a blues band playing bass and harmonica.”
Something which came as a surprise to the band was the entry of their album in the American charts at about 180, which isn`t bad for a band who haven`t had a sniff of the country. “We were astonished by this,” Mauro said, “it must have been by word of mouth, we hope to play there soon. With all these exciting things happening to us we are finding less time to play in Italy.” At this juncture Mauro was informed that the band were due to appear so I decided to take my seat in the Poly`s main hall.
The band`s performance was polished. I never had doubts of their musical proficiency but their presence and excitement on stage is something to be seen. Some of their numbers needed tightening up but I suppose nerves accounted for this. Each of the members Flavio Premoli – keyboards, vocals; Franco Mussida – guitar; Franz Di Cioccio – drums, the newly acquired Yan Patrick Djivas on bass and Mauro featured remarkable solos and definitely deserved the standing ovation they received.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Wings, Mott the Hoople, Roxy Music, Dave Mason, Smokey Robinson, Kiki Dee, Richie Havens, Back Door, Lance LeGault.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth (and a bit about Silverhead) FROM SOUNDS, November 17, 1973

A short, but nice concert review. Enjoy!

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Nazareth Concert Review

By Jerry Gilbert

Poor old Nazareth`s gig at the Rainbow about to be turned into a live album, a sell-out show and a party for the group afterwards, and what happens – a performance which in their eyes at least, was fairly sub-standard.
Not that the band themselves were below par, although there were obvious signs of tension early on, but the sound was terrible both in terms of balance and quality.
All in all they must have caused Roger Glover, who was there to produce the live album, a lot of headaches in spite of the fact that they finally drew the desired response from the audience with a tremendous finish.
Basically it was the old dynamic Nazareth – with that beautifully phased opening to “Night Woman” right on through to “Broken Down Angel”, “Bad Bad Boy” and “Woke Up This Morning” with interludes midway through the set to feature Manny Charlton`s ever improving slide playing and a showcase for the new numbers from “Loud `n` Proud” which included “This Flight Tonight”.
Darrell Sweet huffed and puffed and pounded out some tremendous drum work with Pete Agnew hitting the same volume level with extremely percussive use of bass. Dan McCafferty was also right on form, wailing out strained, piercing vocals, and on another night Nazareth would have scored a resounding victory. It was only the atrocious sound which caused them to falter.
Silverhead, on the other hand were tremendously impressive as the young punk band who pull fewer punches by substituting better music to get results these days. They had the audience on their feet clapping before the end of their set and the rivetting display of Michael De Barres, whose timing is so precise, led the band to a stirring conclusion in the shape and form of “Rock And Roll Band” and “Ace Supreme”, a couple of vintage numbers from their first album. A thoroughly absorbing performance.

 

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Nils Lofgren, John Lennon, Free, Ronnie Lane, Ozzy Osbourne, Carlos Santana, Average White Band, Dale ‘Buffin’ Griffin, Magna Carta, Alice Cooper.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Uriah Heep FROM SOUNDS, November 17, 1973

Recently I discovered that Heep`s drummer through most of their career, Lee Kerslake, has been diagnosed with cancer and have only been given a year or two to live. While death is a fact of life, it is also sad to see many of heroes go before us, and it is especially sad when it concerns such a great musician and what seems to me to be a nice human being. This is a review from a concert while Kerslake was in the midst of Heep`s possibly greatest time of their career. And I am sure that i speak of behalf of thousands of older rock fans when I say: Thank you for the music, Mr. Kerslake – you made an impact in our lives.

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Concert Review

By Roger Harvey

Portsmouth is a great place to start a tour – for sure. After regular doses of the super cool Rainbow it`s good to see fans nodding and bopping all night long instead of the usual encore type.
Uriah Heep, fresh from America, presented a formidable box of tricks on Thursday night. Starting with a couple of rockers just to check out the audience, they were home and dry almost before they had begun.
David Byron, the dictator of Heep, commanded the audience to witness a “slow number”, “If I Had The Time” from the album “Sweet Freedom”. A slow number from Heep you ask? Yes, but heavy and building with good harmonies the tours of America have taught Uriah plenty about dynamics and pacing. The energy positively crackled through the air as the lights changed constantly, well in tune with the stage antics.
A brief respite in the intensity allowed Ken Hensley chance to show us his latest electronic wizardry. Combining organ and synthesizer with various gadgets, he played a 10 minute solo which pushed many through time warp nine.
“If you`ll go back to your seats for just this slow one, we`ll rock for the rest of the night”, David pronounced. The title track from “Sweet Freedom” followed just as tight as possible Gary Thain and Ken Hensley playing chord games with each other and Mick Box`s guitar soaring overhead.
Now the flood gates opened. “Look At Yourself”, “Lover” and a rock and roll medley brought the show to close. Crystal clear sound and the band in happy top form had produced a memorable brain assault.

 

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Nils Lofgren, John Lennon, Free, Ronnie Lane, Ozzy Osbourne, Carlos Santana, Average White Band, Dale ‘Buffin’ Griffin, Magna Carta, Alice Cooper.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Golden Earring FROM SOUNDS, November 17, 1973

The last time I posted an article about this band there was a sudden influx of readers of the blog from the Netherlands. So here is one more for you great people of Holland – and other friends of this band who with this, their ninth album, also went to no. 12 on the American Billboard charts. Their most famous single, Radar Love, went on to a 13th place in the Billboard singles chart. Yes, they were sort of huge in America for a while.

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Album Review:

Golden Earring: “Moontan”
(Polydor 2406 112)

By Pete Erskine

This is the other Dutch band; and this is the eight time in succession that I`ve played this album. So far I have experienced no after effects at all. So far, it would seem that this is yet another master work of samey background music. During the last circuit – between the opener “Rader Love” (featured on the “Whistle Test” last week) and “Vanilla Queen” I repaired a plug, washed the dishes and had a shave. Upon my return I wasn`t even aware that the album had been playing until the player switched itself off. I did think that the “Whistle Test” film clip was impressive though; if their material is, as others have said, a composite of early 60s styles, that`s more than compensated for by their visual side. I thought they looked really good – vocalist Barry Hay has great style and I thought Cesar Zuiderwijk`s final leap over his drum kit was pretty spectacular. Golden Earring do seem to exude a strong charisma – and according to recent reports, a great deal of spunk on stage. By way of contrast “Moon-tan” is excessively meandering, too full of near-misses and changes in musical direction to imprint itself on the listener. There`s little doubt that instrumentally the band are exceptionally capable – viz. the gentle contrast of the harmonic guitar passage rounding off “Candy`s Going Bad” (a feel reminiscent of some of the more ethereal Traffic things) and the instrumental mix involving flute, guitar and rhythm section on “Are You Receiving Me” – but the sum quantity is, rather sadly, an album which is still too easily forgettable.

Moontan

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Nils Lofgren, John Lennon, Free, Ronnie Lane, Ozzy Osbourne, Carlos Santana, Average White Band, Dale ‘Buffin’ Griffin, Magna Carta, Alice Cooper.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Black Sabbath FROM SOUNDS, November 17, 1973

One of the greatest albums in rock history, along with many other albums this band released. Here is the review in Sounds from the time of its release. And you may like to know that Skip Bifferty was an English psychedelic rock band who released their one and only album in 1968. Something that must have been a fact only known for connoisseurs even in 1973.

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Album Review:

Black Sabbath: “Sabbath Bloody Sabbath”
(WWA 003).

By Rob Mackie

There`s a really pretty instrumental called “Fluff” on this one, which features Tony Iommi playing harpsichord in semi-Elizabethan style, with acoustic and steel guitars and piano, and suggests a future Iommi solo album might well be worth a careful listen. I mention that first because you might well assume that Sabbath are capable of nothing but blasting the eardrums with their prophecies of doom and destruction for all. Well, of course, there`s plenty of that too. When they`re in full swing, Sabbath`s style is a bit like that TV commercial where the hammer smashes the peach. If you can`t argue with a car, what chance have you of even complaining as the B.S. tank rolls relentlessly on? Ozzy`s high, nasal vocals cut through the deep grumbles of the instruments like a cry of true pain, with lines about “the execution of your mind” and such like. The backdrop is laid down firm and true – if Sabbath ain`t your cup of blood, then that`s that, but if you like heavies, these guys know what they`re doing. Iommi`s guitar is always coming through with something above the general rut – his solo at the end of “Looking For Today” put me in mind of Skip Bifferty, which is no complaint. Synthesisers have extended the band`s range too – guest Rick Wakeman shows the way at the end of side one, and on the second side, all the band except drummer Bill Ward take up the infernal machines, and don`t do badly by them. Menacing stuff, for those as likes to be threatened.

Sabbath Bloody Sabbath

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Nils Lofgren, John Lennon, Free, Ronnie Lane, Ozzy Osbourne, Carlos Santana, Average White Band, Dale ‘Buffin’ Griffin, Magna Carta, Alice Cooper.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.