1974

ARTICLE ABOUT Judas Priest FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

This as a fun one. The very first album by Judas Priest reviewed sort of favourably. I think the title cut of this album is really infectious and I wonder why Mr. Makowski didn`t mention this possible hit song in his review of the album. Well, you can`t win `em all I guess?

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Album Review

Judas Priest: “Rocka Rolla” (Gull Gu11 1005)

By Pete Makowski

This album reminds me a lot of Black Sabbath`s debut record – It doesn`t reach the highest peaks of originality but I can understand why this band are gaining in popularity. This album will undoubtedly cater to heavy metal freaks. The cover is by the most excellent John Pasche whose style is instantly recognisable. But back to the vinyl: I remember seeing this band many aeons ago in a different form, and even then they managed to pack quite a punch. The next time I saw them was when they supported Budgie and they were fair. This album indicates that the band have improved musically, although it seems to be derivative and cliched at times. The most original track and also the longest is “Winter”, which features some interesting feedback effects leading into a quite melodic section. The rest of the numbers move quite well as the title of one track implies – “Run Of The Mill”. It`s a pretty disposable album, but shows promising indications of things to come.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, Roger Glover, Pink Floyd, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, George Harrison, Phil Spector, Bad Company, Janis Ian, Elton John, Thin Lizzy.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Phil Lynott (Thin Lizzy) FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

One of the biggest poets in hard rock music – always good to read about him and here we learn about his recent book of poems, a book that in its first edition have an price estimate these days of 150 to 200 Euro.
Enjoy this one.

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Music while you wait

Thin Lizzy`s Phil Lynott has written quite a few good lyrics in his time and now he has a book out “Songs For While I`m Away” with 20 of his songs in it. Here he talks to Geoff Barton about the book and Thin Lizzy Mk. III.

In my mind at least Phil Lynott is a first class, if not a foremost, rock lyricist. Perhaps it`s this which brings Thin Lizzy out of the bag of popular-but-pretty-boring-really bands, sets them a little apart from the rest, and gains them a certain amount of respect from fans and critics alike.
And though I`ve yet to see the new four piece Lizzy line-up, there`s no reason why they shouldn`t continue to be the same old solid, driving and powerful band that recorded “Vagabonds Of The Western World” and notched up no small amount of memorable live performances.
No reason at all… unless Phil abandons his bass guitar for quill pen and sets out to be a poet. Oho – that`s not in the least likely, but nevertheless he does have a book of poems or songs out at the moment, called “Songs For While I`m Away”.
It`s a brief selection of 20 or so of his songs, and most of them have been recorded at one time or another by the band, though not necessarily in the form in which they appear. They can`t really be categorised as poetry as such – they don`t really stand up to the transition on to the printed page – but if you can appreciate them as rock lyrics alone and nothing else, then they become quite superb.
The well-tried and popular rock lyric (i.e.: “Oooh baby, too much, yeah”) rarely says anything at all – no one worries about it that much, and more often than not it`s accepted as a matter of course. But Thin Lizzy lyrics are really the odd ones out. Be they about a juke joint and someone with their cycle outside (wanna try?), or about flagrant fields and schoolboy eyes, the Lizzy lyric invariably means something, tells a story of whatever.
And it`s a refreshing change.

INSPIRES

Lizzy`s management offices were pretty quiet – a typewriter clacked away in the background, and that was about it. Then Lynott & Co arrived, just back from a meeting with Phonogram, their new record company, to disrupt the whole scene. Lynott, clutching a Marvel Comic, strode into the room and caused quite a fracas. “What`s the Hulk`s other identity? Who`s the Silver Surfer?” he quizzed.
The interview, Phil. Oh yes.
“… Most of my songs are autobiographical,” he says in rapid, nasal Irish tones, “that`s what inspires me to write. If I experience something, and I think that experience is worth sharing with somebody else – then I write a song. My whole reason for writing songs is to share my experience with… whoever. Maybe the person who listens to our records, or has the book. I hope it`s an experience that they can relate to.”
Peter Fallon, poet and brother to B.P. Fallon, together with artist Jim Fitzpatrick suggested to Phil that he should get “Songs For While I`m Away” together. And so he did. He sent Fallon 50 or so poems from which he selected about 20, and Fitzpatrick chose a couple to illustrate. The above book was the eventual result.
Phil: “It wasn`t my idea at all. But Ireland is such a small place that you can easily get something like the book arranged and on the move. In England you need a reason to do this sort of thing. In Ireland you don`t need a reason. If you get your money back – great. If you lose it all – so what?”
There`s no chance that Phil will lose money on the book, for the first edition sold out quickly and it`s currently being reprinted. It looks like it`s going to be a steady seller for some time.

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PERSONAL

Some of the inclusions in the book struck me as being very personal exercises, notably one about a pregnant girl called “Little Girl In Bloom”, and another about racial prejudice entitled “Black Boys On The Corner”. I wondered if Phil was at all wary in revealing his personal thoughts to a wide audience.
“In the music it`s cool, but in the book it strikes me as being a little different. Recently I`ve been doing a fair amount of interviews concerning the book, and I find it really embarassing to talk about it. Sure I can talk about the book as a book alone – but the minute you sort of go into particular poems, it gets so embarassing, I figure I`ve said it the way I want to say it, so why should I expand upon it?
“But the nice thing about it is that people are looking at me now and saying: `yeah, he writes a decent lyric or two`. They realise that I`m not just a singer in a rock and roll band. So now I know that people are going to be listening to me, it`s definitely going to be harder to write songs. I want to try and make them more meaningful – I definitely want to spend a lot more time on them.
“But what`s really worrying me is that I`m doing more interviews about this book than about the band!”
Okay, so what about the band? The departure of Gary Moore led to the break up of perhaps one of the most visual three-piece bands, but the truth is that Moore wasn`t happy – he considered Lizzy a pop band, of all things. So, now we have Lizzy Mk. III, or thereabouts.

CRAZY

“All those personnel changes – for a while it was really bad, but now it`s beginning all over again. This Lizzy is the best Lizzy that`s ever been.” He pauses, as if expecting some sort of retort on my part, then continues:
“When we were a three-piece there was a certain emptiness in the sound, and we couldn`t explore the material sufficiently. But now the current band is playing… well, more like a band should play. With Gary we were like three individuals in one band, it was a crazy line-up, but as a live act we couldn`t fail.”
Gary Moore appears on one track called “Still In Love” on the new Lizzy album “Nightlife”, together with singer Frankie Miller. The rest of it is four-piece Lizzy with new guys Scott Gorham and Brian Robertson.
And before 1975 is out, there should be a Phil Lynott solo album, featuring material vastly different from the band`s usual stuff and showcasing him, if not necessarily in his capacity as musician, then in his capacity as a songwriter.
Phil: “I`m looking forward to the album more as a project than a product.”
And why not?

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, Roger Glover, Pink Floyd, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, George Harrison, Phil Spector, Bad Company, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Bad Company FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

Sorry about the delay of this post. Work and private commitments have taken up too much of my time lately, but I hope things will be in regular order soon. So here`s one with Paul Rodgers at the time when Bad Company ruled the world. Hope you like it!

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Bad Company: work`s a four letter word

Billy Walker talks to Paul Rodgers, a few short weeks before the band`s second British tour and finds his old acquaintance more full of get up and go than he`s been for a long, long time.

It`s fitting that Paul Rodgers, PR to his friends, should be so called. Why? Because Bad Company couldn`t ask for a better public relations man than Rodgers, a guy that sells his band and its wares with every sentence he utters.
Things are of course very bouyant for Bad Co. at the moment what with all the fuss that`s been made of them both here and in the States and Rodgers reflects this with a new found ease and confidence.
Paul`s always been a lively if somewhat meandering interviewee (or is it my deadly dull questions?), slowly but surely warming to the task. His answers grow more thoughtful and expansive as time wears on and on this occasion this new found assurance keeps the rugged Rodgers` features regularly creased with smiles and croaking laughs.
Little quips like: “Yeah, but I`d better not say `ad I in case somebody else pinches it”, when dutifully asked the working title for Bad Company`s new album that`s nearing completion. Canny dudes these Northerners.
But Paul is ready to divulge that the album is in fact well under way and that, God willing, will be through by the weekend. There`ll be eight or nine tracks on this one and final details should be available when the final mixes and a few overdubs are completed.
“Si`s got a couple of tracks on this one which have turned out really nice.” Rodgers reports, but what about the deeper aspects of it, same writing team, a move forward hopefully?
“It`s pretty much as it was before, Mick and I write a few and we have our own… I think its er, I hate to say it, but I think it`s a natural development. (First knowing smile of the day.) Well, the American tour`s done us a lot of good because a couple of the numbers we`ve got on it we`ve been doing on stage so they`re nicely broken in, y`know.
“I think it`s, it`s fantastic,” Paul adds with a wild guffaw.

He does seriously feel though that this album comes a little closer to the band`s real potential and is eager to confirm that the creative juices are flowing at the oddest times. Songs were coming together from nothing in the studios and Rodgers feels that Bad Company is still only in its initial stages of development.
Some critics, myself included, felt that while their debut album was good it tended to play it safe a bit, would it be difficult to fight against the same tendency? “We probably will do what we were doing before because we know it`s right but not completely, not to the extent of doing exactly what we`ve already done.
“We didn`t fall into anything like that in the States because we were still supporting so there wasn`t really a chance to rest on our laurels and there`s also too much happening in the band to wanna do that. There`s too much we want to do, there`s not the time to sit around thinking `that`s it`, we`re too involved with the progress of the thing, the way it`s rolling on.”
The band used Jimmy Horowitz to do the strings for one of Simon Kirke`s numbers on the album, but wasn`t this a slight departure from what Bad Co. fans might expect? “Yeah, yeah I don`t think we`re attempting to do what people expect from us exactly.
“I think to a certain extent it`s what you`d expect and to a certain extent it moves away from that sharply, especially the strings, I think they`re going to surprise a few people actually.”
The driving enthusiasm that Rodgers shows nowadays is underlined by the number of times `work` comes into the conversation. There`s no looking for time off, no wanting wuick two month breaks in the Bahamas, it`s all work, talk, thought and expression. So the American tour seemed like a fruitful avenue to explore.
“Well, it was a very hard tour because we were working all the time, but it was good for us, we needed to do that to get to know each other and the playing improved from gig to gig, got more and more exciting. It`s the best tour I`ve ever done.
“It`s hard to know what to attribute it to, I think the music`s straightforward and simple and there`s not a lotta bands doing that, but I do think we have a certain kind of chemistry, you know the spirit of the band and it comes over to the audience.”

Rodgers is quick to admit that he has learnt a lot musically from fellow Bad Company Boz and Mick Ralphs, saying:
“I don`t know that much about music myself, I just guess most of the time.” and continues this blaze of modesty by saying that they knew that they had to go out for this tour of the States without any headlining dates in order to get the ball rolling. But US audiences do vary.
“The thing I like is that the general attitude to music in the States is looser, more tolerant to what you do, but basically I think it`s down to the fact that they`re bigger, the audiences are that much bigger therefore you have to do that much more to get it over.” Change your act maybe?
“You adjust to it yeah, you don`t compare, don`t say `we do this in Britain so we`ll do…`but we just lose a slow number, put in a fast one or whatever`s necessary. I think you have to be a little more raucous over there, you don`t have to be anything but to get it over you have to be a bit… say, louder, bit more forceful.
“I think American audiences like to be slightly dominated and some groups really wipe `em out, but I don`t mean that, I mean to involve them at the same time.
Tour No. 2 for Britain comes in a few weeks and there won`t be any drastic changes in the material Bad Co. offer the fans, it`ll be a combination of stuff from the old album and some fresh toons too. The likelihood of a longer set than we saw last time is on the cards too, with the new material and this closer working relationship nothing, if Rodgers` mood is read correctly, will halt Bad Co`s progress.
Still on the subject of work, Paul feels certain that the prospects of any solo venture are fast retreating, if not already disappeared since the band`s take off, “it`s all going into this band, I just don`t think it`s necessary”, he says and with the future plans including tours of Europe and Australia/Japan in the offing, looks like he could be right.
One of the main factors to the continual disharmony and final split of Paul`s former band Free was that the egos involved tended to stifle talents and encourage side-taking in the various warring factions. He`s obviously a lot happier now. Are there less ego problems within the ranks of Bad Company?

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“I think we`ve all gained a lot of experience in the past four or five years and all of that`s going into the band now. When you have four people together you always have, slight ego problems because that`s a lot of the drive of a musician anyway. But there`s no problems that way.”
But Rodgers can understand `one man` band set-ups for all the hassles of the past:
“I can see that working but not in a band that I`m in because I never know exactly what I want anyway. I think to do that, you have to know what you want note for note and be prepared to enforce that, but I don`t think you get a real group feel that way.
“You all have to be part of the music, feel that you`ve contributed an equal part to it and that`s the way you get a really good band feel. When I write a song it`s really basic, the only thing I have together is the tune and the words and perhaps the beat, what everyone actually plays is down to the individual themselves, there`s no sense of `you gotta do it this way`.”
So Paul needs the strength of a band behind him, a kick up the arse? “I need to have a lot of balls and drive behind me to get me going because I`m a bit of a miserable sod really”, a slight smile showing the ever present broken front tooth, “and I get that a lot, especially from Mick who`s really dynamite on guitar, he`s developing all the time.”
And the compliments flow on, Bad Company and its existence filling Rodgers` every thought like how it feels to have `finally` made it – “being there for me means being in the band making music that is satisfying, the fact that it is also successful is a boost, so that is great. It`s a confident feeling within the band as well and I really like it.”
Does he think of success in terms of pound notes? No, no. Obviously it`s nice to earn money for what you do but that isn`t the motive behind what we`re doing at all. We don`t weigh it up in terms of X amount of dollars, we just make the album and do the best we can.”

But what of Rodgers himself, has he managed to retain his creative spark over the turbulent years of Free and into Bad Company, is the drive still very much alive within him?
“Well, I`ve always been like that for as long as I can remember. I`ve always wanted to make it and I`ve always wanted to take a look at things, try and understand them and try and put them into a song, I haven`t really thought about trying to maintain it, I just do it.
“I go around thinking about things and they pop out of my head in the form of a song. I`m quite an intense person anyway, I do too much thinking actually, I have to work things out all the time because I`m a little bit thick,” time for another foxy, bearded grin, “If I feel something quite strongly I like to put it into music.
“Yes, I suppose it is an escape, the realities are a bit of a drag I find. It`s nice if you take an audience out of itself while you`re on stage, they can forget the oil crisis or whatever… and you can yourself.”
With Bad Company obviously looking to join their stable companions Led Zeppelin in the elite rock and roll ratings the likelihood of higher ticket prices, through rising prices, cost of transportation etc, could Paul see a time when the fans will have to shell out around £5-7 (£57.50 – 80.50 in 2018 – Blog Ed.) to get into a gig?
`I think when you get that big you`re into different realms, it`s a different level to the one I think on. I`m not that conscious of how much people have paid to see the band I don`t go out and think `they`ve paid a couple of quid to see us` because I would do my best whether they`d paid three bob or three quid.
“When you get to the point of charging 6 or 7 quid I don`t know what to say about that, it`s really big business as far as I`m concerned. I suppose some people have the attitude. `If you can get that much, go get it`, I don`t exactly think it`s very moral.”
Onto the ever present question of glitter and as, by their own admission, the band`s first debut album was a put down of the glittery side of the biz, Paul`s general feeling that the more basic, soulful forms of music are fast returning, the days of the funky bands could be returning, not necessarily at the expense of other forms of music but as well as.
“I find that most stuff in the charts for me doesn`t have any bottom to it, it just misses me, it doesn`t get me off. I think there`s a lack of groups around like Joe Cocker, Cream and Jimi Hendrix – it was creative but it was also commercial, but at the same time very soulful. There`s a slight lack of soulful feeling at the moment.

“I think there`s both ends (glitter and the `Tubular Bells` brigade) but there`s no middle, no substantial, solid music… very little anyway.” But perhaps glitter and the showmanship angles were a natural reaction after the straight, `go out and play-nothing else matters` approach?
“Well, that`s the other end of the extreme, I don`t think you should purposely go out looking like you`re skint, like shitty jeans… although I like shitty jeans, I feel more relaxed – but on stage I think the audience like to think you`ve made an effort and if I go and see a group I want them to look good as well as sound good.”
Not surprisingly the theme of work returns to its ever important position, it`s so natural for Paul to be thinking about it now that it seems a shame to curtail the flow. Honouring both sides of the Atlantic`s expectations seems a daunting task, but not if you`re in BC.
“We will do a lotta work because we want to. I love Britain, we all love Britain that`s why we did our first tour here and Britain gave us a lot of confidence. Whether or not we made it bigger in the States doesn`t matter too much, without the confidence we got here we wouldn`t have gone to the States in a conquering mood, so it works both ways.
“Coming back to Britain from America we feel ready to really play here again, the two balance each other out. It`s important to make it in our own country, not from a financial point of view, it`s just a nice feeling, like your home town sort of thing.
`At the moment how it works is we have a steady output, like a working capacity, we have lots of energy and just keep moving all the time and doing things. We would hate to have any kind of layoff at the moment because we go from one thing to another album, British tour, American tour, album, British tour – it just rolls, we`re not getting bogged down by working too much.”
But how about the delicate balance of over kill or under kill, isn`t it a real danger for the band? “You need a bit of both, you can over expose yourself and you can do the opposite too, just slip from the public`s eye and people forget you or you get less exciting. It`s just a matter of timing, we just keep a steady output of work, which is what we love to do and try and keep people happy.”
Finally Rodgers freely admits to living from day to day, taking things as they come and not looking beyond the bounds of his current, almost idyllic situation with the band. Things, he feels, start to go wrong when those thoughts start to rumble a bit but doesn`t he ever wonder what his next band will be like?
“I have done up to this point, yeah, this is the band that I`ve been wondering about…

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, Roger Glover, Pink Floyd, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, George Harrison, Phil Spector, Thin Lizzy, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT George Harrison FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

A very exciting interview with Mr. Harrison. He clearly evades some questions that are a lot tougher than what I think music journalists are allowed to ask stars of this magnitude these days. This one is really worth reading. Enjoy.

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The dark horse rears his head

After months of rumours and years of wishful thinking, George Harrison has finally hit the road. His massive tour will take in 27 American and Canadian cities for 50 concerts in under two months. It`s the longest tour ever undertaken by a former Beatle since the fragmentation of the band four years ago.
Harrison held an hour-long press conference in the Champagne Room of the Beverly Wilshire Hotel to answer any questions. The room was cram-packed with reporters, television crews and photographers. He spoke about the Beatles, together and otherwise, drugs, the up-coming tour, his newly formed Dark Horse Records, his wife Patti who is living with Eric Clapton, his personal taste in music and much more.
SOUNDS` ANDY McCONNELL was there.

Why, after all these years, have you decided to return to the States?
I`ve been back here many times. This is the first time I`ve been back to work. It`s the first time I`ve had an H-1 visa since `71.
What are the reasons for not having an H-1?
I had the same problem as John Lennon. I was busted for marijuana back in `67 by Sergeant Pilcher.
Did you have a hard time convincing the people to give you a visa?
It takes a long time, you know. A lot depends on Washington and how busy they are and they`ve been pretty busy lately. We applied for it months ago. It`s come through fine, but once the tour`s over I`ve got to get back.
What are your feelings about the up-coming tour?
I think if I had more time I`d be panic-stricken, but I don`t even have time to worry about it.
What kind of material will you be doing on the tour?
Couple of old tunes and a lot of new ones. The old tunes seem to have got slightly different arrangements. I`m gonna do “My Sweet Lord” and “Give Me Love”, but slightly different variations of them. They should be much more loose.
Will Ravi open the show?
No, I`ll be opening the show, but it`s definitely not going to be a Bangladesh Mark II, if that`s what people are thinking.
Will you be playing Britain and Europe?
I`d like to. I tried to squeeze a concert in just before Christmas although all the halls were booked out. The feeling within the band is that we should do a gig in London. They`re saying, `let`s do 12 dates, let`s tour England, let`s tour Europe`. I want to go to Japan. I want to go everywhere. This year there`s too much for me to do and not enough time to do it in.

Is there a paradox between your spiritualism and the atmosphere when you`re touring?
It is difficult, yeah. It`s good practise in a way, to be, as they say, in the world but not of the world. You can go to the Himalayas and miss it completely. Yet you can be stuck in the middle of New York and be very spiritual. I noticed some places like New York bring out a certain thing in myself while I found in places like Switzerland there were a lot of uptight people because they`re living in all this beauty, there`s no urgency in trying to find the beauty in themselves. If you`re stuck in somewhere like New York you have to look within yourself; otherwise you go crackers.
Do you have any anxieties as the tour approaches?
The main one is that I`ve lost my voice, I mean to a degree. It`s getting a bit rough and gravely. There`s a good chance the first few concerts I`m gonna come out playing instrumentals (laughing).
Do you have an album in the can?
Almost. I have a few things to do on it.
Who plays on it?
Some of the basic tracks I did last November. I had (Jim) Keltner, Ringo, Gary Wright, Klaus (Voormann). Some of the tracks I did this year with Willie Weeks, Andy Newark, Tommy Scott; the people in the band on tour with me.
What`s the album entitled?
“Dark Horse”.
Why was there such a gap between this album and “Living In The Material World”?
I`ve been busy working. I was busy being deposed. I`ve been doing some tracks of my own, did the Splinter album, finished up Ravi`s album, been to India for two months, organised the music festival from India; I`ve done a million things.

Why don`t you grant personal interviews?
There`s nothing to say, really. I`m a musician, not a talker. If you get my album it`s like “Peyton Place”, I mean it`ll tell you exactly what I`ve been doing.
When will it be released?
When I`ve finished it.
What are your hopes for your Dark Horse Records? Do you see it becoming very large?
No, no! I don`t want it to turn into a Kinney. I`d like it to be decently small.
What artists do you hope to get on it?
I don`t hope to get any in particular. To tell you the truth, I`ve been here just over a week, and if I signed all the people who gave me tapes, I`d be bigger than RCA and Kinney put together, but fortunately I don`t have time to listen to them all.
Do you pay much attention to what the critics say?
I cancelled all my newspapers five years ago, so I don`t really know what people say. If I do see a review of an album I`ll read it, although it doesn`t make too much difference what they say, because I am what I am whether they like it or not.
Are you ever amazed at how much the Beatles still mean to people today?
Not really. It`s nice. I realise the Beatles did fill a space in the `60s and all the people the Beatles mean anything to have grown up. It`s like anything; if you grow up with something you get attached to it. One of the problems in our lives is that we get attached to things. I can understand that the Beatles did nice things and it`s appreciated that people still like them.
The problem comes when they want to live in the past, when they want to hold on to something. People are afraid of change.

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Have you seen the play?
You mean `John, George, Harry, Ringo, Fred, Bert and Stigwood`? That`s been going on there but I haven`t had a chance to see it yet. I hear conflicting reports. Some people say that it`s lousy and they`re in tears because they say Brian Epstein is lousy, others say it`s fantastic, Brian comes off like an angel. I`ll have to see it when I get a day off.
Are you involved in any serious negotiations to get the Beatles back together for one night?
No, you`ve been reading Rolling Stone.
What did you think of that article?
The point is, it`s all a fantasy, the idea of putting the Beatles back together again. If we ever do that, the reason will be that we are all broke. There`s more chance that we`ll do it because we`re broke than because… and even then, to play with the Beatles… I mean, I`d rather have Willy Weeks on bass than Paul McCartney. That`s the truth, with all respect to Paul. The Beatles was like being in a box, we got to that point. It`s taken me years to be able to play with other musicians. Because we were so isolated it became very difficult playing the same tunes day in, day out.
Since I made “All Things Must Pass”, it`s just so nice for me to be able to play with other musicians, and having played with other musicians, I don`t think the Beatles were that good. I think they`re fine, you know.
Ringo`s got the best back beat I`ve ever heard. He hates drum solos. Paul is a fine bass player, he`s a bit overpowering at times. John`s gone through all his scene but he feels like me, he`s come back around. We`re all at that point. I mean, to tell you the truth, I`d join a band with John Lennon anyday, but I couldn`t join a band with Paul McCartney, but it`s nothing personal. It`s just from a musical point of view.
How did you choose the musicians in your own band?
I didn`t really choose them… so many things in my life I don`t really do; I just feel like an instrument. I knew I was doing a tour and I knew I had to have a band, but I didn`t want to commit myself to anybody, I just let things roll on. I only met Andy Newmark and Willie Weeks a few months ago. If I hadn`t met them, I wouldn`t have a rhythm section, but I believe the Lord provides me or you or all of us, if you believe that, he provides you with whatever you need.

What is your relationship with John and Paul?
It`s very good, actually. I haven`t seen John because he`s been in the States although I`ve spoken to him over the phone. He seems like he`s in great shape. I just met Paul again and everybody`s really friendly, but that doesn`t mean we`re going to form a band.
Let me change the subject… Are you getting a divorce?
No, that`s as silly as marriage.
Did you make any musical rebuttal to “Layla”?
Pardon?! How do you mean, musical… what rebuttal! That sounds nasty. Eric Clapton`s been a close friend for years. I`m very happy about it, I`m still very friendly with him.
Seriously? How can you be happy about it?
Because he`s great. I`d rather she was with him than with some dope.
What`s your attitude on drugs now?
Drugs? Got any? What drugs? Aspirin? What are you talking about? What do you define as drugs? Whisky? I don`t want to advocate them because it`s so hard to get into America.
What do you consider to be the crowning glory so far in your musical career?
As a musician? I don`t think I`ve got any yet. As an individual, just being able to sit here today and be relatively sane. That`s probably the biggest accomplishment to date.
Who are some of the contemporary artists that you admire most?
Smokey Robinson, I`m madly in love with Smokey Robinson. There`s so many of them. I like Dicky Betts. I think Ry Cooder is sensational.
What about Stones?
Yeah, the Stones, you know, they`re fine, you know; nice. I like the Stones. Variety`s the spice of life.
Can you see a time when you`ll give up being a musician?
I can see a time when I`d like to give up this kind of madness, but I`d never stop music. Everything`s based on music.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, Roger Glover, Pink Floyd, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, Bad Company, Phil Spector, Thin Lizzy, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Roger Glover (Deep Purple) FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

I will let Wikipedia say what needs to be said about this one: “The work was originally conceived as a solo vehicle for Jon Lord to be produced by Roger Glover who had recently left Deep Purple. However, Lord proved too busy with Deep Purple, and Glover took up the reins on his own. Using his connections, Glover recruited a large cast of noted rock musicians, with a different vocalist for each character, including David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes.”
Read on!

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Glover has a ball

By Pete Makowski

Roger Glover is a satisfied person nowadays. Since his departure from Deep Purple, Glover has steadily been building up a good reputation as a record producer and now his new venture, “The Butterfly Ball”, will gain him respect as a musician and composer.
“I always felt that people expected certain kinds of things from me,” said Roger, “when I was approached to do this project, I thought `shall I do something really heavy and rocky, or shall I do the complete opposite`. Then I decided to do exactly what I felt was right, not just live up to everyone else`s expectations.”
“The Butterfly Ball And The Grasshoppers Feast” is the title of a book illustrated by Alan Aldridge (well known for “The Beatles Illustrated Lyrics”) around the poetry of William Plomer. Now Glover has taken the idea of the book and transformed it into music.
The music from the album is going to be used in a forthcoming cartoon serial based round the book and there are also possibilities of a film and a play.
The unlikely marriage of Aldridge and Glover resulted via British Lion who first met Roger via Purple when they filmed their “In Concert” performance.
“We used to get lots of offers to do film scores, but I never really considered it before although I did check them out. And when I left the band this came along and it interested me right from the start.
The next move was to write the music. “I didn`t write anything until it got close to the deadline, I find I work better under pressure.
“A lot of the numbers involved experimentation. I had to find out which vocalist would suit a certain number. If it didn`t work with the people at hand then I would hire a session guy.

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“I hope people don`t treat this as the soundtrack album, it`s the `Butterfly Ball` a thing of its own. Songs from the album will be used in the series when it`s made and sold, and I wouldn`t mind doing the incidental music for it because it`s something I haven`t done before.”
The projected cartoon series will be done by Alan Aldridge and Lee Mishkin. The pilot of the film is definitely in the Disney class. The film has that kind of appeal which will attract both the juvenile and adult market. Terry Flounders has the job of making “The Butterfly Ball” a household name – as he did with the Wombles. It`s a winner, although Roger can see some pitfalls.
“I can see a couple of things that would hold it back. Primarily my name. Y`see the album can`t exactly be described as a family album but then again it`s not anything in the mould of Purple. When people hear it they immediately put it under certain categories, which is something I can`t stand. This album should stand out on its own as much as within the context of the film… it`ll be interesting to see what the critics say.
“I`m really glad to be off the road,” said Glover, “although I`ve got to admit I did think about getting a band together. I sometimes miss gigging which is different to the high pressure touring schedules with Deep Purple.”
Glover puts his career with Purple well into the past, although he doesn`t knock it, he feels it has contributed to his cynical outlook towards the music business. “There are so many false people you can meet in a business like this it`s untrue.”
Glover`s production ventures have brought him much success and satisfaction. “It was when I started producing I realised I wanted to write again, cause when I produced a band I`d find myself writing parts and changing parts for them which I don`t feel is the right thing for a producer to do.
“I`ve been living in Kingsway (Ian Gillan`s studio) for the most of this year and I`ll be taking a rest for a while… I think I deserve it.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, George Harrison, Pink Floyd, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, Bad Company, Phil Spector, Thin Lizzy, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.