Concert review

ARTICLE ABOUT Status Quo FROM SOUNDS, May 17, 1975

Did the mighy Quo ever play a a bad concert in the 70s? I am sure they did, but there weren`t many. Here`s another one of those good ones.
Read on!

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Quo`s May blitz

By Pete Makowski

It may be unlucky for some people but to Quo 13 years represents a longevity that equals and even surpasses many well established bands. And to celebrate this little event the band decided to undertake an anniversary tour opening at Leicester`s De Montfort Hall last Thursday.
It was, as expected, a raging success and also revealed a new musical side to the band in a set that lasted over one and three quarter hours and was executed at a ball-breaking pace. The audience was, as expected, solid Quo fans, and being Quo fans they made sure it was an event to be remembered.
The evening opened with a set from The Pretty Things, another band who have been around for a while. Their set was impressive but not properly paced, too many long drawn out `come on clap your hands` sessions. The last time I saw them, their set was tighter, slicker and had more success. Still a really ace rock band.
Quo`s set opened up with a swirling mass of dry ice, the closest the band have ever got to theatrics. The band got onto the stage and it was Blitzkreig. They opened up the set, as they did last tour, with `Love Me When I`m Down`, with Alan Lancaster stooped over his bass, growling the vocals with fire and brimstone. A sea of denims surged forwards as Rossi belted out the vocals of `I Saw The Light`, off the `On The Level` album.
Next a change of guitars and Parfitt took the microphones, slowing the pace down with `Nightride` and then bringing it back up to the normal Quo energy level with `Little Lady`.
Silence fell over the hall as Rossi`s hoarse vocals accompanied by a quiet (would you believe?) guitar backing played `Most Of The Time` which developed into an extra heavy weight twelve bar.

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Then came the contrast with a slow tempo country ditty by the name of `Claudie`, featuring some strong harmonies. This was followed by a trip down memory lane in form of `Gerundula`, featuring, wait for it, Rick Parfitt on acoustic guitar, Rossi playing a Les Paul (the first time I`ve seen him play a different guitar) and Alan Lancaster on rhythm guitar… have Quo gone acoustic?
No, but at last they have found a way to pace their set without killing the energy level, the audience didn`t seem to mind and the atmosphere was brought up to an almost electrifying peak with a medley featuring `Backwater`, `Just Take Me` and `Forty Five Hundred Times`, with some surprisingly competent guitar work from Rossi, whose style is usually more forceful than constructive.
These numbers also displayed John Coughlan`s hard tireless attacking drum playing that provides the backbone to Quo`s solid wall of sound. Next came a series of powerchord boogie workouts with Rossi, looking a bit worse of wear by now, running up and down the length of the stage, with Lancaster and Parfitt following his example.
`Roll Over Lay Down`, `Big Fat Momma` and `Don`t Waste My Time` had the crew rocking from side to side. The amazing thing about Quo gigs is that no matter how frenzied the audience is there are never any attempts to storm the stage even though there are no barriers and minimal security.
The set ended with `Roadhouse Blues`, featuring the infamous sailor`s hornpipe and when you see a few thousand kids jigging it`s quite something. The band returned with an encore featuring `Caroline`, `Mean Girl` and an amazing drum solo from John Coughlan, culminating with `Bye Bye Johnny`. Hasn`t anyone told these guys we`ve got an energy crisis? Great stuff.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!
The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.
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ARTICLE ABOUT Genesis FROM SOUNDS, April 26, 1975

A very honest and good account of the concert and the meaning of the plot by Mr. Makowski.
Read on!

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A touch of the Jaggers

Concert review by Pete Makowski

The stage was set. On the left hand side Steve Hackett was seated with guitar and a melange of effects around him. Behind him Michael Rutherford was stooped over his twin neck bass and six string guitar. On the right Tony Banks was half hidden behind an impressive selection of keyboards, in the centre, with headphones, sat Phil Collins with surrounding percussion.
The rest of the area was a playground for Pete Gabriel`s surreal fantasies.
If you haven`t already guessed, I saw Genesis at the Wembley Empire Pool last Monday, to be precise and left extremely impressed. On every level the band transcend any kind of expected performance standard. Musically they are so proficient they make that part of the job look like a secondary exercise. Visually, apart from Gabriel`s cavortings, the lights, three screens of tightly synchronised slides and stage effects left me confused as to what I should be focusing on. Seeing a show as spectacular as this hits you right between the eyes and it takes a while before you can gather your wits and listen to the music.
This was the debut performance, in Britain, of the band`s new work `The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway`. After hearing the album countless times, and seeing the live show I haven`t got any closer to understanding the plot, so I enjoy it on a superficial level. Gabriel plays a New York droog (Rael) who goes through a whole series of crazy dreamlike fantasy scenes. When Gabriel plays a part, he seems to become the person totally. Dressed in a leather jacket and worn denims he strutted around the stage looking like a real street punk. Some of his poses reminded me of Iggy Stooge, Lou Reed and even a touch of the Jaggers. His whole presence dominated the scenery.
They played the whole double album with only a few minutes breathing space, where Gabriel told the story. The show, as you all probably know by now, features a lot of interesting effects including a monstrous entity with self inflating warts, The Supernatural Anaesthetist, and one part where you are confronted with two Raels. The whole show didn`t solely rely on the theatrics although it wouldn`t have worked without them. After such an impressive and obviously exhausting performance, the band returned for more in the form of `Musical Box` and `Watcher Of The Skies`. Now that`s what I call showmanship.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!
This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frank Zappa, Gladys Knight, Women In Rock, Betty Wright, Steve Harley, Peter Frampton, Labelle, Peter Skellern, Ray Davies, Larry Uttal, Chris Spedding, Anne Murray, Sweet Sensation, Bernard Purdie, Mike Harding, Ronnie Lane, Yes.
The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Slade FROM SOUNDS, April 26, 1975

No doubt that Mr. Holt had the time of his life watching Slade!
Read on.

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Slade – Kings of rock

Concert review by Phil Holt

Slade`s shows have an atmosphere all of their own, and the nearest comparison is that of a football match. The fans bring along their scarves, rosettes, top hats and either chant impatiently for their heroes to emerge or just simply sing Super Slade. Then, when the set gets underway, we have singing, shouting, stomping, swaying, choruses of `You`ll Never Walk Alone`, all led by the Kop cheerleader-in-chief, Noddy Holder. The control he exerts over the crowd is amazing and as successful as ever – he keeps the mood light and good natured with not a hint of aggro anywhere. Perhaps Noddy should be Tommy Doc`s next signing.
The music itself fits neatly into this package storming along at a vast rate of knots and containing the simple but effective hookline – either a riff or via the lyrics – that have made Slade the undisputed kings of commercial rock.
All the old favourites were there `Goodbye To Jane`, `Bangin` Man`, `Every Day`, plus a couple from the film, plus a couple of new numbers that fit into the Slade vein perfectly. The act itself was carefully structured with pedestals for Jimmy Lea and Dave Hill to mount and ramps extending into the audience.
But any doubts that may have existed about everything being too arranged was shattered by the spontaneous energy of Slade`s finale. This was a complete rock segment starting with `Let The Good Times Roll` and finishing with`Get Down And Get With It` that shook the Birmingham Odeon to its foundations. So Slade finished with a reception that they will find hard to equal anywhere in this country, never mind America.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frank Zappa, Gladys Knight, Women In Rock, Betty Wright, Steve Harley, Peter Frampton, Labelle, Peter Skellern, Ray Davies, Larry Uttal, Chris Spedding, Anne Murray, Sweet Sensation, Bernard Purdie, Mike Harding, Ronnie Lane, Yes.
The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Black Sabbath and Black Oak Arkansas FROM SOUNDS, May 25, 1974

A new year is here, and as my first posting I think that this double concert review will kick off things in style. Funny that these two “black” bands toured together. Enjoy!

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Concert review

By Pete Makowski

Stoke, Bloody, Stoke, eh? I can now admit to seeing my first Sabbath gig and it proved to be quite a mind shattering experience. For a start Stoke Trentham Gardens venue is quite an odd place anyway what with a ridiculously limited capacity (something to do with the doors on the side of the hall not being counted as fire exits) also, it`s in the centre of what could be described as Stoke`s version of Kew Gardens. It seemed quite strange to see a band as heavy as Sabbath in such serene surroundings.
The band that kicked off the evening were American friends of Sabb – Black Oak Arkansas who left me rather dazed and confused. They went down extremely well and I can understand why but the music they played was absolutely dire. But that didn`t really matter because with a showman like Jim Dandy they could help but go down well. That guy comes over strong like a sledge hammer in the guts. His vocals are deep and raunchy and he struts around the stage like an arrogant peacock occasionally leaping up in the air and pulling various stunts.
All the numbers sounded the same with the exception of “Mutants Of The Monster” and their rendition of “Dixie” which was very well played.
Ozzie Osbourne and Jim Dandy project themselves in a similar way and they would also win first prize in the look alike contest. Something that impressed me more than Dandy`s cahorting was the drummer Tommy Aldridge, who played an immaculate solo. Technically I wouldn`t know how good it was, that didn`t matter it was just so hard and
rhythmic that the guy even got a standing ovation from the audience. And when he leaped out to the front of the stage offering his sticks to the audience, there was virtually a riot.
He then went back and played some more without sticks, that guy has just got to be seen to be believed. The band had to do an encore which turned out to be their best song of the night, their single “Jim Dandy” and kids were still screaming for more after that. If this band`s music matched up to their stage act they`d be sensational but until then I can see them doing well at gigs but I wouldn`t imagine their records selling in the masses. Still I can honestly say I`ve never seen an unknown support band go down so well.

The stage was done up quite nicely with an English and American flag suspended from either side and a huge crucifix was hanging in the middle with strands of white wool trailing down either side. Their gear consists of speakers on top of speakers and mountains of amps – I`ve never seen so much equipment.
Sabbath strode onto the stage calmly and the crowd immediately leapt onto their feet. They opened the set with what I believed to be “Tomorrows Dream” and Ozzie leapt into action straight away flaying his arms all over the place and peace signs seemed to be the order of the day. Boy are they loud, it`s not so much the volume it`s the way they use it. It pounds into your nervous system and renders you helpless.
Each number kept at the same thunderous pace. The best part of the night was when they played material of their new album including “Killing Yourself To Live” and “Sabbra Cadabra” which featured some neat guitar from a short haired Tony Iommi.
Being a bit of a riff rat myself I really rate their new album which is much more refined than their previous efforts although it stays closely to the roots that they were set on the first and their other good album. Other numbers the band pounded away were “War Pigs”, “Snowblind”, “Iron Man”, and “Children Of The Grave”, which closed the show. Of course they came back for an encore.
“This songs from `Paranoid` what`s it going to be?” screamed Ozzie.
“PARANOID!” the audience yelled back, they were right. The band really let loose. Bassist Geezer Butler is quite a showman himself moving all the time occasionally kicking a leg up into the air.
I`ve got to admit, for the most part I didn`t enjoy this concert and I found myself watching the audience more than the band. I just couldn`t cope with the sound which came over dull and monotonous. But I`m glad I saw them just for the fact that I can now appreciate why their fans like them so much.
I spoke to Ozzie after the set and it seemed that the band were disgruntled with the sound the monitors were giving.
“For sound this place is terrible it`s like a bloody second world war aircraft hanger,” said Osbourne, “but I suppose this is the only good venue. Anyway the kids enjoyed themselves and that`s what I`m here for.” I wish I`d said that.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Goldie Zelkowitz, Curtis Knight, Simon Alexander, Steely Dan, Chris Stainton, Ronnie Lane, Elliott Murphy, Loudon Wainwright, Tim Buckley, Steve Miller, Beach Boys, Tommy Vance, Jim Simpson, Stefan Grossman, Lynsey de Paul, Mott the Hoople, Kevin Ayers,
Dave Cousins, ELP.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth (and a bit about Silverhead) FROM SOUNDS, November 17, 1973

A short, but nice concert review. Enjoy!

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Nazareth Concert Review

By Jerry Gilbert

Poor old Nazareth`s gig at the Rainbow about to be turned into a live album, a sell-out show and a party for the group afterwards, and what happens – a performance which in their eyes at least, was fairly sub-standard.
Not that the band themselves were below par, although there were obvious signs of tension early on, but the sound was terrible both in terms of balance and quality.
All in all they must have caused Roger Glover, who was there to produce the live album, a lot of headaches in spite of the fact that they finally drew the desired response from the audience with a tremendous finish.
Basically it was the old dynamic Nazareth – with that beautifully phased opening to “Night Woman” right on through to “Broken Down Angel”, “Bad Bad Boy” and “Woke Up This Morning” with interludes midway through the set to feature Manny Charlton`s ever improving slide playing and a showcase for the new numbers from “Loud `n` Proud” which included “This Flight Tonight”.
Darrell Sweet huffed and puffed and pounded out some tremendous drum work with Pete Agnew hitting the same volume level with extremely percussive use of bass. Dan McCafferty was also right on form, wailing out strained, piercing vocals, and on another night Nazareth would have scored a resounding victory. It was only the atrocious sound which caused them to falter.
Silverhead, on the other hand were tremendously impressive as the young punk band who pull fewer punches by substituting better music to get results these days. They had the audience on their feet clapping before the end of their set and the rivetting display of Michael De Barres, whose timing is so precise, led the band to a stirring conclusion in the shape and form of “Rock And Roll Band” and “Ace Supreme”, a couple of vintage numbers from their first album. A thoroughly absorbing performance.

 

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Nils Lofgren, John Lennon, Free, Ronnie Lane, Ozzy Osbourne, Carlos Santana, Average White Band, Dale ‘Buffin’ Griffin, Magna Carta, Alice Cooper.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.