Concert review

ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth (and a bit about Silverhead) FROM SOUNDS, November 17, 1973

A short, but nice concert review. Enjoy!

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Nazareth Concert Review

By Jerry Gilbert

Poor old Nazareth`s gig at the Rainbow about to be turned into a live album, a sell-out show and a party for the group afterwards, and what happens – a performance which in their eyes at least, was fairly sub-standard.
Not that the band themselves were below par, although there were obvious signs of tension early on, but the sound was terrible both in terms of balance and quality.
All in all they must have caused Roger Glover, who was there to produce the live album, a lot of headaches in spite of the fact that they finally drew the desired response from the audience with a tremendous finish.
Basically it was the old dynamic Nazareth – with that beautifully phased opening to “Night Woman” right on through to “Broken Down Angel”, “Bad Bad Boy” and “Woke Up This Morning” with interludes midway through the set to feature Manny Charlton`s ever improving slide playing and a showcase for the new numbers from “Loud `n` Proud” which included “This Flight Tonight”.
Darrell Sweet huffed and puffed and pounded out some tremendous drum work with Pete Agnew hitting the same volume level with extremely percussive use of bass. Dan McCafferty was also right on form, wailing out strained, piercing vocals, and on another night Nazareth would have scored a resounding victory. It was only the atrocious sound which caused them to falter.
Silverhead, on the other hand were tremendously impressive as the young punk band who pull fewer punches by substituting better music to get results these days. They had the audience on their feet clapping before the end of their set and the rivetting display of Michael De Barres, whose timing is so precise, led the band to a stirring conclusion in the shape and form of “Rock And Roll Band” and “Ace Supreme”, a couple of vintage numbers from their first album. A thoroughly absorbing performance.

 

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Nils Lofgren, John Lennon, Free, Ronnie Lane, Ozzy Osbourne, Carlos Santana, Average White Band, Dale ‘Buffin’ Griffin, Magna Carta, Alice Cooper.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Uriah Heep FROM SOUNDS, January 13, 1973

Another useful review for people to dissect. I am now looking forward to a month of football, but I will try to keep this blog running as usual in between games, household chores and work.

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Live concert review

By Tim McKenna

Three thousand fans arrived at London`s Rainbow Theatre on Sunday to see Uriah Heep, which was almost a shame for Silverhead, the opening support act. However, despite antagonising an already unsympathetic crowd by being late, they managed to slowly swing the atmosphere into their favour with their direct brand of soul-based rock and roll.
With the audience still warm, Uriah had little to do but whip them to near hysteria by the end of the evening, which they did comfortably. Until then we had heard them play, not particularly spectacularly, tracks from three of their albums, the new one “Magician`s Birthday,” “Demons and Wizards”, and “Look At Yourself”.
They chose a heavy set opening with a piece from “Magician`s Birthday” and also included “July Morning”, “Gypsy” and “Tears In My Eyes”. At times the choice was too heavy and it was a relief to hear the uptempo “Sweet Lorraine”, “Look At Yourself”, and “Love Machine”.
“Gypsy” in fact was leavened by a devious solo from Ken Hensley, incorporating a three part organ and mini moog solo which began with a moog interval sounding at times like the scraping of steel on porcelain. He continued the solo with a Bach-type organ recital and ended it with a “Caravan” trip on the moog, along with Lee Kerslake`s drums.
Ken also took lead guitar on “Tears In My Eyes”, but after a promising start, it tailed off into a dismal undirected mass of sound, plodding along without mystery, interest or precision. Nevertheless, Heep freaks were jiving in the shadows like plants from another galaxy and were no doubt encouraged by seeing bassist Gary Thain riding on singer David Byron`s back as he knelt on the floor.
Earlier, “July Morning” from “Look At Yourself” had trodden much the same path though David Byron`s humorous inflections saved it from disaster.
Yet, for Heep, it was a spectacularly successful evening. Perhaps it was because they were on home territory for the first time for some while. But whatever it was, when Byron asked everyone to stand up and clap along to their closer, “Look At Yourself”, they did – and they didn`t sit down again, just stood yelling and screaming for more.

 

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Fairport Convention, Ronnie Wood, Jon Hiseman, Pentangle, Claire Hamill, Ray Davies, Al Kooper, Procol Harum, Hemlock, Graham Bell, Elton John, Brinsley Schwarz, Martyn Wyndham-Read, John Peel, Uriah Heep.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

ARTICLE ABOUT Status Quo FROM SOUNDS, January 13, 1973

Just a short one today as I know some people use these concert reviews in many ways. Some may read them doing research for books on the touring history of a band, and others use them to check if their bootleg is complete or just to discuss certain episodes happening at a certain concert. There may be other reasons that I can`t think of right now, but imagine this could be sort of useful for some people. So more of these will be coming.

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Live concert review

By Jerry Gilbert / Ray Telford

Status Quo and the JSD Band did well to fill the Rainbow on Saturday, and it was highly encouraging to see diametrically opposed factions whacking out their own steamy rock and roll to a full house who were perpetually off their seats dancing.
For the JSD Band the concert was an enormous success and signified their enormous popularity since coming down from Scotland last year. When it comes down to it, even London audiences will react with body and soul to good medleys of jigs and reels, and on the night front men Des Coffield, Sean O`Rourke and young fiddler Lindsay Scott, were brilliantly fast and in perfect harmony.
Status Quo`s performance finally installed them as this year`s most likely contenders for the quick trip to the big time in the same way as Slade did last year.
This, however, was precisely what Status Quo fans had come to hear – a hard faced rock band who played to them on their own level with no glittery showbiz pretentions. In fact, the group represents exactly the opposite for their dress evokes strong memories of those halcyon days of a million dusty blues bands, and their audience communication is summed up neatly in the way Mike Rossi delivers his energy laden rough talk between numbers.

The same goes for their music, too, for it comprises a powerful barrage of rugged riffs pumped out onto two guitars in the handling of Rossi and Ricky Parfitt above an aggressive sounding rhythm section. Alan Lancaster on bass and John Coughlan, drums, do a fairly solid job, but they lack a certain crispness in their tempos which lessens the overall effect of the music.
One of the most popular numbers in the set was “Railroad” which Rossi sang with amazing verve above the surging waves of instrumental power. It`s music that you simply can`t knock because its effectiveness portrayed itself in the stomping, jeering audience who refused to let the group leave the stage until three encores had been played.

 

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Fairport Convention, Ronnie Wood, Jon Hiseman, Pentangle, Claire Hamill, Ray Davies, Al Kooper, Procol Harum, Hemlock, Graham Bell, Elton John, Brinsley Schwarz, Martyn Wyndham-Read, John Peel, Uriah Heep.

 

 

ARTICLE ABOUT Elton John FROM NEW MUSICAL EXPRESS, January 4, 1975

There are a lot of concert and album reviews in the music papers that I seldom give any attention. This time I will make an exception, because this concert review mentions the song “Grimsby” that Elton John made. It so happens that Grimsby Town is my favourite football club in the English league. They have been struggling for some years now, but have fantastic support among their fans. Recently they started a Crowdfunding campaign to collect money for wages in the hope that they will be able to earn promotion from the 5th tier of the English Football League next season.
I have donated some money to this campaign and if you like this blog I hope you will help out too – here`s where you can read a little bit more and contribute: http://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/GTFC

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Elton John / Hammersmith

By Neil Spencer

Curses upon the Marylebone Road and all the traffic that prevented me catching the Elton John Christmas Special in its magnificent tinselled entirety.
Gigs as good as this one are rare enough, without spending the first twenty minutes stuck inside a mobile with the King`s Cross blues again.
Thus it passed that at least one reporter is unable to pass judgement on the opening numbers of what was the first EJ gig these shores had witnessed in no small age, and one of but a handful that the man had put together to celebrate his return to Britain, the festive season, and the third division.
No reservations about the rest of the three hours which John played though – sheer brilliance from him and the band; there must be very few acts capable of brewing up the sort of atmosphere that washed round the Hammersmith Odeon by the end of the night. Even at Christmas.

Hell, you saw it for yourself on the Christmas Eve Colour Stereo spectacular on telly on Christmas Eve, didn`t you?
You didn`t? Shame.
Previously I had been more than a mite sceptical about the continuing esteem in which the Elt was held, Charlie Murray`s superlatives notwithstanding, and was unwilling to grant anything more than lightweight status to the fellow and his ridiculous eyesight.
But, live at least, Elton John adds up to a lot more than a good voice and a bunch of trendy lyric sheets.
The guy has charm, he has style, he can sing and play with ferocity as well as delicacy, and goddammit, he can rock and roll.

He opened – or so I was reliably informed – with a clutch of solo numbers from the early albums; things like “Skyline Pigeon” and “I need You To Turn To” that the usual Elton gig allows no time for.
E`en so, it was not long before the band appeared for “Country Comfort,” “Highflying Bird” and a roaring frantic “Burn Down The Mission” which closed the first half.
Billows of dry-iced mist billowed forth as the curtain rose for “Funeral For A Friend” with the svelt Elt perched on his piano stool looking like he`s just fallen off the top of the Christmas tree in his little tin soldier glitter outfit, which struck a strange contrast with the dark yawning eeriness that came from the PA system and the raucous tones of Elton as he sang “Love Lies Bleeding,” with the band cooking behind him.
Then came the hits, one after another, so that you started wondering how many chart entries that guy must have to his name that you should know so many of his works without even trying.

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“Candle In The Wind”; a short break for “Grimsby” off the “Caribou” album; then “Rocket Man” with more punch and directness than ever came across from the radio, and a superlative “Benny And The Jets,” which is presumably Elt`s idea of a soul number (it made the US R&B charts) and sung in his best mock Donnie Elbert falsetto.
The audience lapped it up. Out came a relaxed nicely paced “Daniel,” a beautifully played “Grey Seal” (a number which certainly deserves wider recognition than some of the man`s more effete pieces), and a wistful “Yellow Brick Road,” likewise handled with loving precision and taste by the band.
Ah yes, the band; Dee Murray`s loping bass lines, Davey Johnstone`s restrained and always appropriate axe work; Nigel Olsson`s subtly understated drumming; and finally a special word for percussionist Ray Cooper, who is the only man (other than Roger Chapman) who can make playing a tambourine look like a definitive musical statement. And who can also blow a pretty mean duck call.

The introduction of the Muscle Shoals Horns put the final seal of mastery on the proceedings, and even though they did manage to blow a few bum notes during the rest of the show, their contribution certainly helped lift “Lucy In The Sky” and a frighteningly energetic “Saw Her Standing There” into another class altogether.
After which we had “Don`t Let The Sun Go Down On Me,” “Honky Cat” and a “Saturday Night`s Alright For Fighting” which went on forever and which would have had just about everyone jiving in the aisles if the bouncers (I mean, Security), chaps hadn`t taken their job quite so seriously.
After which what could possibly follow in the encore but “Crocodile Rock,” “Your Song” and “White Christmas” itself, complete with a few hundred balloons and a couple of hundredweight of polystyrene snow just for good measure.
Nice one Elt. You may never get promotion to the second but you sure know how to put on a neat show. The Pope should never have tried to follow an act like that.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper and you are free to use it as you like. If you use it on your own webpages – please credit me or put up a link to my blog.

This number of New Musical Express also contains articles/interviews with these people: Rod Stewart, Mike Heron, John Entwistle, Donovan, Ginger Baker, The Doors.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail, if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be around or upwards of 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT the Faces FROM NEW MUSICAL EXPRESS, January 6, 1973

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper and you are free to use it as you like. If you use it on your  own webpages – please credit me or put up a link to my blog. If you really like this sort of thing – follow my blog!

You can`t ignore a band where two of the members later played for The Who and The Rolling Stones and one of them went on to enjoy a terrific solo career. So here is a concert review for those of you who are interested!

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KERUUNCH – The Circus Hits Town

JAMES JOHNSON postscripts the FACES tour
– and finds the answers to the critics

It apparently doesn`t take long to find new ways to knock a band. Take the Faces for example.
With their British tour over and the plexiglass stage packed away for another day, the word round less charitable quarters
is that they`re past their best; they`re tired, rely too heavily on old material, and the easy-going style they created has near enough exhausted itself.
But that`s a little unfair, wouldn`t you say? Or at least a trifle premature.
Maybe in some minor respects the band have indeed eased up. Touring, in general, is now taken a little more calmly and they`ve even cut down on the boozing.
Yet the firm and unalterable fact is that when they`re on stage they are, quite simply, the brightest, most entertaining outfit in British rock and it`s unfortunate if all they get for their pains is a kick in the teeth.
I caught two concerts on the tour – at Brixton and Sheffield – and it was obvious from both that whenever the Faces play it`s still a mighty big event.
Perhaps, of the two concerts, the Brixton gig was more ostentatious – a whole crowd of Faces` friends in the circle, an unending chain of collapsed chickies being squeezed ungraciously out of the front rows and dragged across stage…while the band provided an extra touch of circus with drinks on stage served by a dwarf standing no higher than Kenny Jones` hi-hat cymbal.
Yes, it was a steaming, rollicking night in the grand old Faces tradition.

By contrast Sheffield was a milder, quieter affair – if any Faces concert could be described in such terms – but interesting in that it provided a chance to watch the band working with things not altogether running smoothly.
The scene was Sheffield City Hall, to be precise. The city had hummed all day with expectancy and when the kids – an uncompromising bunch with rough hands and loud throaty voices – tumbled into the auditorium they brought with them their own tough, loose atmosphere.
Down in the bar it was elbowroom only, with bitter selling fast as the serious drinkers warmed up.
Most barely looked up from their pints as a guy with big boots, large nose and sloping forehead, obviously already well soused, slouched in a corner yelling “Rod-nee, Rod-nee” with the kind of venom normally reserved for football terraces on a Saturday afternoon.
Backstage though, things were decidedly cooler. Promoter Peter Bowyer paced the corridors wearing a face as anxious as an expectant father.
The Faces were late, getting later and all anybody could blame was the English weather, mid-December.

With their usual panache, the band were flying to all gigs in a specially hired plane. That is, all expect little Ronnie Lane, who, in particularly homespun manner, was travelling round the country in a Land-rover with his family in the back.
This time, though, the Faces plane – with all five on board – had been grounded in London by fog. And, with obvious delay, they were coming up by car instead.
Perhaps they shouldn`t escape blame entirely. After all it doesn`t take much imagination to foresee that this might happen in the middle of winter.
Still, Vigrasse and Osborne went on, played a comfortable, punchy little set and came off to find still no word or sign from the Faces.
The hall-manager started getting tense about licenses and Bowyer`s face grew longer as the first rounds of slow-handclapping infiltrated from the front. But at least the roadies appeared unconcerned, knowing anyway that the band have never been exactly the world`s best timekeepers.
“It won`t matter,” said one, casually hitting open a Coke can against a table.
“You know what`ll happen. Rod`ll go on, say: `Ow are yer? Sorry we`re late mates`, they`ll get into the first number and nobody`ll care.”

And, of course, most of the impatience in the audience was really half-hearted. After all it was Friday night, two days before Christmas and the Faces were going to be on stage sooner or later. You couldn`t help but feel good.
Then, with the arrival outside of a Daimler, there`s a flurry round the stage door; noise, speed, action, people pushing and the Faces are there.
A quick dive in the dressing room, time just for a change and a tune-up and then the band are on stage with 2000 voices raised in mighty acclaim.

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It was a magical, heartwarming moment. There was Rod raising his glass to the upper circle, Ronnie Wood in trousers like they`d been made out of red foil, Kenny Jones adjusting his drums like the true professional, Ian MacLagan in a tasty piece of tartan suiting and Ronnie Lane looking the East London kid in a natty Petticoat Lane barrow boys suit.
And Keruunch, with the welcoming roar still pouring out of Yorkshire throats, the band swooped into the beautiful opening,
sliding chords of “Memphis Tennessee”.
They had come on cold, the stage was frankly too small for comfort and they looked really a little brusque, even grim. But after three numbers, the length of time they seem to normally take, the band hit full stride, and they really did stride.
Yeah, it sounded fine, music that made the eyes steam, the pulse quicken.
Next it was a number Stewart pointedly described as a new one, twice in fact, although forgetting to mention the title. But the chugging, rolling, momentum of it was just the impetus needed for the crowd to rise to its feet as one.

By “Maybe I`m Amazed” it started to look as if the Faces were enjoying it too. It`s an old number, yes, but still sounded fresh, while “I`d Rather Go Blind” was amazing, with Wood splicing off pealing guitar notes before shuddering into a chord and Stewart proving once again that he`s one of the monster, razor-edged vocalists of all time.
As is usual, Wood had virtually his own spot on “All You Need”, sliding over the frets with cigarette jutting out between firmly-clasped lips.
The band`s next single “Cindy”, plus “You Wear It Well”, and “Maggie May” saw them still warming without perhaps quite hitting top but all the band smiled on “Angel” as the people out front swayed, singing the chorus, hands clasped above heads. An amazing sight.
More numbers, a super-charged encore with “Twisting The Night Away”, footballs kicked out to outstretched hands and finally the band are back in the dressing room looking a good deal more pleased than when they arrived.

By the time they were back at the hotel the general view was that the concert had been a good one if not a great one; no more, no less and nobody really seemed too concerned.
The talk at the dinner table was football rather than music.
Stewart wonders what`s going to happen to the Scottish team now that Docherty is at Manchester, cabaret is provided by Ron Wood taking over the restaurant`s hot-plate, pouring brandy over it and igniting a little dish known as “Plat de Burnze`oteldown` made up of salad, menu cards and anything else that happens to be available.
Mostly, though, the atmosphere is low-keyed. Jones and Lane want to go back to London for the night while most of the others want to go to bed.
Perhaps, by Faces standards, the concert had been unspectacular.
Perhaps it could be said on more run-of-the mill gigs the Faces have indeed lost some of their zip, some of their enthusiasm.
Even so, it doesn`t detract from their performance. At Sheffield they`d still put on a hell of a fine show. Next time they play the City Hall tickets will again be hard to find.

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David Cassidy used to be the one that all the little girls dreamed of. When studying this ad you could be right to conclude that he was mighty popular in 1973.

This number of the NME also contains articles/interviews with these people: Jimi Hendrix, Fumble, Joni Mitchell,
Danny Seiwell, Class of `73 (Hopefuls to succeed), Stray, Trapeze.

This edition is sold!