Deep Purple

ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM New Musical Express, December 20, 1969

A very good review for this ambitious and highly original project done by Jon Lord and the boys in the Deep Purple.
Read on!

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Deep Purple`s classic and pop get-together

Record review:

Deep Purple & The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra: Concerto For Group and Orchestra
(Harvest stereo only SHVL; 33s 6d)

This is the LP recorded live at that sensational concert last summer, when Deep Purple combined with The Royal Philharmonic, under the energetic baton of Malcolm Arnold, to try and prove that pop and classical music need not be poles apart. The reaction to the concert at the Albert Hall was one of immense satisfaction and admiration, but it met with luke-warm receptions from the `heavy` critics.
So, it is not unreasonable to suppose this album will go the same way. In three very varied movements, organist Jon Lord, who wrote the entire work, takes the group and orchestra through the stages of combatants, touch-and-run lovers and finally a rousing, spirited free for all.
The evening was fun, and the album can`t hope to capture the incredible atmosphere, but to the thousands who loved the music, this very fine LP will be a must. And for those who didn`t attend, you`ll be able to find out exactly what you missed.

Deep philhar

ARTICLE ABOUT Glenn Hughes (Deep Purple) FROM Sounds, November 8, 1975

A short interview meant for you musicians out there, but also a great read for those of you who just like to listen to music, and especially Deep Purple?
Enjoy!

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Purple Hughes: the 24-hour musician

By Tony Mitchell

THE FACT that Deep Purple’s two newest members — Glenn Hughes and Tommy Bolin — are both in their early twenties must be some encouragement to the many young musicians who feel that they play well but have not paid their dues in terms of sheer years of experience. With a view to finding out what it takes to be young and successful, SOUNDS collared Glenn for half an hour at a recent preview session for the band’s new album.
He talked about the approach to music which sold him to the other members of Deep Purple and added a new soulful dimension to their sound.
Purple asked Glenn to join them in 1973 after seeing him play at the Whiskey-a-Go-Go and the Marquee. They went backstage and told him they thought his playing was nice, but he didn’t suss that they were interested in him until they actually offered him the job. At this time he was into a black trip as far as vocals and bass were concerned, having gone from Trapeze, which he formed in 1970, to hanging around the Stax scene in the States and playing the clubs there.
He only joined Purple on condition that he could carry on playing the way he felt, with a definite accent on feeling, and, in his own words “it worked out”. But what led him in this particular direction?
“I started playing guitar when I was 14,” he says, “and I did this for four years until someone asked me to play bass on a gig. From then on I got more and more into bass-playing, although I kept up the guitar — and still play it with Purple.”
He didn’t approach learning the instrument in any formal way. “I just learnt by getting into it, and listening to Stax people like Booker T and Marvin Gaye. I used to listen to Hendrix and Clapton as well but I was always more influenced by soul,” he says.
“In Trapeze we were playing rock ‘n’ soul, and I’m now starting on a solo soul album which is being produced by David Bowie and features people like Herbie Hancock, Dennis Davis, Tommy Bolin, Dave Sanborn and Ava Cherry and her singers.

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The album contains all self-penned material, and will feature Glenn’s favourite instrument — a `brilliant’ Fender Jazz Bass. He used to use a Precision which he favoured for its twangy sound, but he really digs his 58 Jazz Bass because, he says, you can bend the strings anywhere, which adds considerably to the instrument’s versatility. The strings he uses for bass, incidentally, are always Rotosound wirewound.
For amplification he likes two 200 watt Hi-Watt tops driving eight Martin bins fitted with either Gauss 5840 or 5841 speakers. He generally has one of the tops set very bright to give him his characteristic sound, and he uses a Compact phaser unit which apparently has a studio-quality shift range. This small clockwork unit, made in Germany and not yet commercially available, is a real phaser — not a simulator – and has been used on a lot of Purple’s album work.
Glenn plays using a combination of pick and fingers, and maintains that feeling is far more important than technique. “Feeling is the first thing you need when you’re learning,” he says. “And even if you’ve got feeling, you also need the will to do it,” he adds.
“When I left school I just knew I was going to be a pro musician — a 24-hour musician, which is what I am now. Mind you, I never wanted to be a star particularly, and I still keep well clear of the business side of things. That can be a bit of a problem — last year I got ripped off by someone to the tune of 100,000 dollars. It’s not a bad idea to have some feeling for business as well as music, for this reason.”

Having mastered guitar and bass guitar, Glenn turned to piano, which he finds is an `unbelievable’ medium for composition, although he does write songs around all three instruments.
“As well as singing, I’m playing guitar and bass on stage, and guitar, bass and piano in the studio. I like to think of myself as a ‘musician’ rather than a ‘bass player’. I enjoy all three so much, and I now think I’ve got a feeling on all three. Bass playing in particular is a feeling.”
Does he think it necessary to invest in expensive equipment in order to find out if you have got the kind of feel he’s talking about?
“Well it’s always a good idea to buy the best you can afford, although I wouldn’t advise spending too much. It’s an unfortunate fact of life that good instruments are expensive these days.”
Glenn is in America with Purple,at the moment, and the band starts a tour of the Far East later this month. Then in the Spring there is talk of a big tour in the UK, but before this his own single — ‘Smile’ will be released. So look out for three minutes or so of real feel in the near future!

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The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Ian Gillan (Deep Purple) FROM Record Mirror, May 27, 1972

To someone who didn`t know better at the time it would seem as Mr. Gillan was a Christian. First he starred in a very central role in the musical “Jesus Christ Superstar” and then he produced the band “Jerusalem”. Funny business for a man who later composed a song called “No Laughing In Heaven”.
Oh, well, this is a treasure from those golden days at the start of the 70s and I`m off to a concert tonight with some other fans of Gillan`s main band Deep Purple, namely the incredible musos of Dream Theater.
Enjoy!

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Svengali Ian Gillan tells of his first Purple Production

CAPTURING THE BIRTH

James Craig chronicles the progress of Jerusalem

POP MUSIC as someone once remarked is well left in the hands of youth and as some of our super stars totter towards the thirty plus signs it might be as well to offer some encouragement and help to those on the starting line.
Certainly that is the thinking behind Deep Purple`s vocalist Ian Gillan`s helping hand to four young men from Salisbury in a band with the unlikely name of `Jerusalem` with an even more unlikely titled single `Kamakazi Moth` (Decca) and an album just released.
Ian has just formed a new production company ‘Pussy Music’ and ‘Pussy Enterprises’ to which Jerusalem have become the first signings and last week he introduced me to half the group in the forms of Bob Cooke (lead guitar) and Paul Dean (bass) over a flagon of ale while he explained his involvement.
“My interest has been in an advisory capacity,” said Ian. “I didn’t so much produce the album as simply advise on a few technical problems and make some suggestions. I came across the band at a time when they were trying to get a record deal together and were in a state of confusion.
“In some ways its a nostalgic thing for me because I see them going through the same kind of problems and transitions that I did in the early days, before Episode Six even, when I was playing with little local bands in Hayes, Middlesex. I’ve always regretted that I never had any record of those early efforts because there was something about the brash enthusiasm of an early musical birth that you never recapture.
“I don’t want to give the impression that these boys are novices because they are not. They started playing almost as infants at school five years ago when Paul met up with Ray Sparrow and got a band together and later at college they met Bill Hinde and Bob Cooke.
“More recently they`ve brought in a new singer, Lynden Williams, and he has just the right kind of dramatics and vocal ability that convinced me that he had what it takes.”

Originally they started out as a `mean dirty blues band’ and moved through a phase they like to forget which was vaguely progressive which means everyone who came to see them sat on the floor like in-animate blobs and soaked up the vibes.
“Young people have just naturally got more energy than that and we want to see them moving about and enjoying themselves,” says Paul.
“Personally I feel that the ‘flashier’ a band is when they come on stage the better they look.
“I think people like Bolan have got it right – young audiences want to see something a bit exotic on stage. We are a flash band in that sense — a bit vicious and a bit sensual. We use a lot of volume but not as a cheap way to generate excitement.”
I think it was Paul who mentioned that the band had got a recent touch of ‘the support band blues’ playing second string to such formidable talents as Curved Air and Manfred Mann.
“Manfred has really got a very good little band together now,” said Paul. “He’s gone back to a basically pop format and it seems to be working. ” He was most impressed to witness the star playing chess in his dressing room prior to his appearance.
“The problem with playing in support of big name bands is that you know that they have come to see the headliners and you’ve really got to play your arse off to get any attention.”
Ian interjected to blow their own trumpet for them.
“Mind you,” he said. “I don’t care what anyone says it is the sole aim of any support band to blow the top of the bill off the stage and if anyone had got a ‘clapometer’ together I think ‘Jerusalem’ would have taken a few points off some of the bands they’ve worked with recently like Medicine Head.
“I don’t think we should give the impression that we go in with that attitude though,” said Paul guardedly. “I mean we found a group billed below us on a recent bill and I felt just a little embarrassed. It’s competitive without being cut-throat.”

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Paul Dean – Jerusalem

Jerusalem have already suffered at the hands of word-slinging record reviewers who like to discourage new rock bands before they have managed to make their first tentative steps but overall they are winning recognition for their musical exuberance and crowd pleasing performance.
Ian hit out at some of those critics who do not seem to care about anything formative or cannot necessarily compare to the technical proficiency of more experienced and qualified musicians.
“I really feel some of these critics who cannot accept the fact that so called ‘heavy music’ has now become pop music by virtue of the fact that it is popular are writing with their heads in the sand,” he said.
“Why is it that some writers seem to adopt this postion that nothing can ever be any good if it is widely accepted and why is it that some bands like Black Sabbath seem so anxious to put down the young people who come to their concerts and refer to them disragingly as `teenyboppers’.
“How would you like to be called a ‘teenybopper’ just because you happened to be young and like bands that retained some essence of vitality. That’s just something else I can’t understand.
A band is hungry so it becomes good out of that hunger. It gets recognised and successful then throws the acceptance back in the faces of the people who made them. It just doesn’t make sense.
“Critics who are not prepared to encourage new talent and make some kind of allowance that no band becomes as good as those who are on top immediately are doing no good to themselves or the business that feeds them. They slam a show which maybe 5,000 people dug and the unfortunate thing is that maybe a quarter of a million people read the review!”
All bands like ‘Jerusalem’ want is a chance to prove themselves and Gillan is doing his bit to lend a hand. More established artists with his attitude would be no bad thing.

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Would this ad be allowed in 2020? Not sure about that….

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Butterfly Ball FROM SOUNDS, October 25, 1975

I have archived this one under “Deep Purple” as it seems the better category considering Glover`s involvement along with other members of that band.

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Concert Review from London

By Phil Sutcliffe

What a pleasantly different experience! After all the doubts and warnings of impending disaster `The Butterfly Ball` live was just about as good as it possibly could have been oratorio-style without the costumes and full trapplings of a dramatic production.
A full orchestra sounding in high spirits put a brassy weight behind most of the numbers. The rock band, including a gaggle of keyboard players and Eddie Jobson in joyful form on the electric violin, made it all a lot more raunchy than the rather precious imagery of the `Ball`s` sundry packaging would suggest. And the infinite queue of eager lead singers suggested an opulence of talent such as is too rarely gathered together on a British stage. The musical edifice sustaining all this, last year`s Mr R. Ex-Purple Glover`s album is nice rather than magnificent, but there were times when most of the Albert Hall and your reviewer got quite carried away.
Members of the Purple family like Coverdale, Hughes and Gillan did their bits in friendly, self-effacing fashion like Dylan at the Bangla-Desh, not wanting to steal anyone`s thunder, but the stars of the night came from the `I-know-the-face-but-who-the-hell-is-it?` set featured as the show came down the home straight.
Tony Ashton (A, Gardner and Dyke) swaggered on like Graham Bond reincarnated, greasy hair, shades and leather jacket, and proceeded to rip away the last vestiges of formality from the proceedings with some sleazy blues piano and matching bar-room vocals that took the musicians as well as audience by surprise. Then he yanked his jacket back off his shoulders for a break of Little Richard razzle-dazzle, cooled it again for his coda, burped loudly and departed to a mixture of applause and hilarity.
John Gustafson (Roxy`s current bass guest) had to follow that with `Watch Out For The Bat` and he met the challenge with revetting vocal energy, high, sinister and savage – why isn`t he a lead singer rather than a session bassist? Then John Lawton (who? A Les Humphrey Singer) set the seal on a jolly, almost flower-powerish, evening with two renditions of `Love Is All`, on the encore, his flat-out professional tenor hitting the high notes exultantly where some of his celebrity companions wavered.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM SOUNDS, October 25, 1975

Time would definitely tell for this record. A very interesting perspective from the time it was released here. Do you agree with Mr. Barton?
Read on!

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Purple: tastes good, but…

Deep Purple: `Come Taste The Band` (Purple TPFA 6715) 39 mins.

Album review by Geoff Barton

Deep Purple have undergone personnel changes in the past and have always successfully pulled themselves through. Happily, `Come Taste The Band`, featuring guitarist Tommy Bolin in Ritchie Blackmore`s stead, brings the band out of their most recent crisis – although not as thoroughly nor as completely as you may have hoped.
This is a particularly fine rock album – but is that really enough? Although `Come Taste The Band` is on a rung above both `Burn` and the jaded `Stormbringer`, it`s not quite up to the required height. To justify their position as one of the world`s top bands and to quell the somewhat cynical rumours that they`ll never be able to fully recover from Blackmore`s departure. Purple needed to come up with a killer LP, something that would stand up proudly alongside the likes of `In Rock` and `Machine Head`. This isn`t it.
Tommy Bolin is an accomplished guitarist; of that there`s no doubt. He`s slotted into the band as neatly as a well-worn key into its lock. He`s injected a heavy dose of fresh energy – I haven`t heard Purple play with such boyish enthusiasm in a long time. His guitar work is succinct, immensely fluid, but never overbearing – indeed, `CTTB` displays a much freer, give-and-take musical attitude than even several early Purple albums.
The problem lies with the quality of the songs. Bolin`s songwriting prowess (he`s contributed eight numbers) is OK – yet he`s a long way from being able to write numbers of the calibre of `Space Truckin“, `Smoke On The Water`, or even (to switch to `RB`s Rainbow album) `Man On The Silver Mountain`.
Even so, they`re not appreciably different from the band of old, here – if anything, they seem to have consciously adhered to tradition, with numbers like `Comin` Home` (even though it has brief `Quadrant Four` guitar) and `Drifter`.
There are snatches, however, that may serve to betray the direction in which Purple may move in the future: the initially punchy `Love Child` has an incongruous funky section, together with what could well be Billy Preston`s moog. `Gettin` Tighter` and `I Need Love` have brief funk passages, as well.
Still, before I get too tied up in (minor) criticisms, let it be said that there is a lot to get excited about, here: notably the rampant `Dealer`, with its `Purple Haze`- like opening, timely ballad section and Hughes` meaty vocals more than making up for its hackneyed lyrical theme, and `Lady Luck`, a potential single.
`Come Taste The Band` is an album that stands head and shoulders above your normal mundane rock release, but at the same time the question must be asked: does it show enough potential and promise to ensure the new Purple a safe passage into the future? Time will tell.

Deep Purple

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.