Geoff Barton

ARTICLE ABOUT Deep Purple FROM SOUNDS, October 25, 1975

Time would definitely tell for this record. A very interesting perspective from the time it was released here. Do you agree with Mr. Barton?
Read on!

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Purple: tastes good, but…

Deep Purple: `Come Taste The Band` (Purple TPFA 6715) 39 mins.

Album review by Geoff Barton

Deep Purple have undergone personnel changes in the past and have always successfully pulled themselves through. Happily, `Come Taste The Band`, featuring guitarist Tommy Bolin in Ritchie Blackmore`s stead, brings the band out of their most recent crisis – although not as thoroughly nor as completely as you may have hoped.
This is a particularly fine rock album – but is that really enough? Although `Come Taste The Band` is on a rung above both `Burn` and the jaded `Stormbringer`, it`s not quite up to the required height. To justify their position as one of the world`s top bands and to quell the somewhat cynical rumours that they`ll never be able to fully recover from Blackmore`s departure. Purple needed to come up with a killer LP, something that would stand up proudly alongside the likes of `In Rock` and `Machine Head`. This isn`t it.
Tommy Bolin is an accomplished guitarist; of that there`s no doubt. He`s slotted into the band as neatly as a well-worn key into its lock. He`s injected a heavy dose of fresh energy – I haven`t heard Purple play with such boyish enthusiasm in a long time. His guitar work is succinct, immensely fluid, but never overbearing – indeed, `CTTB` displays a much freer, give-and-take musical attitude than even several early Purple albums.
The problem lies with the quality of the songs. Bolin`s songwriting prowess (he`s contributed eight numbers) is OK – yet he`s a long way from being able to write numbers of the calibre of `Space Truckin“, `Smoke On The Water`, or even (to switch to `RB`s Rainbow album) `Man On The Silver Mountain`.
Even so, they`re not appreciably different from the band of old, here – if anything, they seem to have consciously adhered to tradition, with numbers like `Comin` Home` (even though it has brief `Quadrant Four` guitar) and `Drifter`.
There are snatches, however, that may serve to betray the direction in which Purple may move in the future: the initially punchy `Love Child` has an incongruous funky section, together with what could well be Billy Preston`s moog. `Gettin` Tighter` and `I Need Love` have brief funk passages, as well.
Still, before I get too tied up in (minor) criticisms, let it be said that there is a lot to get excited about, here: notably the rampant `Dealer`, with its `Purple Haze`- like opening, timely ballad section and Hughes` meaty vocals more than making up for its hackneyed lyrical theme, and `Lady Luck`, a potential single.
`Come Taste The Band` is an album that stands head and shoulders above your normal mundane rock release, but at the same time the question must be asked: does it show enough potential and promise to ensure the new Purple a safe passage into the future? Time will tell.

Deep Purple

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

 

ARTICLE ABOUT Alice Cooper FROM SOUNDS, September 20, 1975

Mr. Barton was not convinced by Cooper going it alone. Quite an interesting perspective in this one.
Read on!

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Alice`s pantomime

Concert review by Geoff Barton

“Well, …. it`s surrealist, innit?” remarked the girl sitting in front of us, eyes open wide, staring at the impressive Empire Pool stage.
Alice has obviously spared no expense for this show: two tall, translucent grey pillars with a thick beam lying on top of them, like a futuristic version of Stonehenge, dominated the platform. In between them was a bed of twisted metal, beside them an over-large toy box, behind them provision had been made for a band. Surrealist indeed.
The Heavy Metal Kids got the evening off to a raucous start: front man Gary Holton was as obnoxious as ever, tripping over periodically and telling his year-old jokes (“We`re gonna play a dancin` number now, but seein` as you`re sittin` down rub your asses on the seats”) The Kids were brash and loud, but didn`t try quite hard enough to win over the crowd. No encore.
Alice took to the stage after a long interval and, tugging at his red leotard, cavorting gormlessly around to tunultous cheers, snarled out the appropriate opening lines to `Welcome To My Nightmare`.
It soon became clear, however, that what should have been the ultimate fusion of rock and theatrical excess was in fact no more than a rather lewd pantomime.
Alice, taking the lead role in this epic, has well and truly discarded his malevolent, blood-lusting `Killer` image and now reminds you of a demented Jack minus his beanstalk.
He plays the frightened little boy, plagued by rotten dreams: he`s taunted by groups of superbly acrobatic dancers, he cowers, crawls, sits cross-legged in front of the toy box and enjoys a Punch and Judy show – in all, a rather embarrassing role.
He acts a vengeful Peter Pan figure who slashes with a sword, kicks around a limp female dummy, is attacked by bulbous spiders and decapitates a blundering cyclops – theatrical overkill, at times laughable and mostly less than convincing.

This was Alice`s trip. If nothing else, it served to tax his abominable voice and reveal to one and all that he has the absolute minimum of stage presence. He should never really have gone it so completely alone.
Alice`s musically excellent band were demoted to mere backing musicians. They were lined up at the back of the stage and could generate little excitement because of their seemingly minor roles (except for the Steve Hunter/Dick Wagner guitar duel, one of the highspots of the evening). Alice had to carry the whole show – and he just failed to pull it off.
It was all precisely timed and choreographed: a combination of live and filmed action, where dancers would leap from and into a cinema screen was quite impeccable – even though it wasn`t rock and roll. Many were all too easily impressed by the effects – the biggest cheer of the evening arose when a giant spider`s web was hoisted up from wisps of dry ice and not when, for example, Alice sang `No More Mr Nice Guy` or `Department Of Youth`.
Even when the theatricals were over and the band played straight rock and roll for the encore, it was strictly anti-climatic. I believe solos were played, though the only clear view I had was of the keyboard player`s head.
“I expected something a little more spectacular,” said the same girl at the end of the concert. I wouldn`t necessarily agree with that – but I do believe that Alice should save shows like this for Broadway and at the same time carefully assess his position in the leading role.

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The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Hawkwind FROM SOUNDS, May 10, 1975

I keep noticing that a lot of the articles that I post these days are by either Geoff Barton or Pete Makowski. These two men have, throughout the years, been utterly important in promoting and making known to us all much of the music we are still listening to today. Their contribution to modern music history must not be underestimated and they deserve a place in the history books when the story of modern rock music goes down on paper.
Oh, well… here`s a good one with those guys from Hawkwind!
Read on!

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Hawkwind: Not a single minded band

Feature by: Geoff Barton

Almost tasteful. A remark that can be taken two ways, to two different extremes: either complimentary, or derogatory.
`Wind are taking it as a compliment, and seem well pleased with their new album which has been called, as I`ve said, `almost tasteful`.
“The album`s called `Warriors At The Edge Of Time`,” remarks drummer Simon King. “Or is it `Warriors On The Edge Of Time`?”.
“I believe it`s just called `Warrior`,” counters co-percussionist Alan Powell.
“No, no, no,” says Simon, “I`m sure it isn`t. I did the layout for the sleeve, after all…”
Typical Hawkwind vagueness and uncertainty – but, given the events surrounding the recording of the album (the title eventually being resolved to `Warriors On The Edge Of Time`), quite forgiveable.
“Yeah, we did it in about a week,” says Simon. “That was totally insane – but at the same time I enjoyed it. We had just one track – Simon House`s – laid down before we went into the recording studios at Rockfield. There, we laid all the backing tracks down in about three and a half days. Then, after we had a couple of days off, we went down to Olympic and added bits here and there, dubbed over vocals and mixed it all. That took about three days, and it was finished.

SHORT

“We had to do it in such a short space of time because we`re soon to tour America. Atlantic, our recording company over there, needed an album to coincide with our visit. It was just fortunate that we had the numbers written and that we managed to get it ready. Still, we got it together and now we`re just sitting here waiting to go over to the States.”
The new album, released in Britain within the next few weeks, as the introduction to this piece suggests, features a much more mature and varied band. While not totally devoid of archetypal Hawkwind numbers, at the same time there`s a fine 6/8 track written by Simon House (“Just to prove that we can do some things that aren`t 4/4”) and a mellow acoustic contribution from Dave Brock (a `The Watcher`). `Space Ritual` type narratives also make their return, with Nik Turner and Michael Moorcock handling the spoken parts, and both Alan and Simon contributing the atmospheric backing.
The album is broadly based around sci-fi author and on-off Hawkwind member Michael Moorcock`s character Erekose, the Eternal Champion.
“It links up with a lot of Moorcock`s books,” says Alan. “We`ll probably do some more work with him for the next album. Not a lot, just bits here and there. `Warriors` was originally going to be some sort of concept thing between us and Moorcock, but it never really came together except for a few of the tracks – the poems, and the lyrics for some of the songs.”
Are you looking forward to returning to America?
“I really can`t wait,” replies Simon. “The first time I went I didn`t like it at all, but now that I`ve got to know some people over there I`m really looking forward to it. It`s only going to be a short tour and we`re going to play familiar places, so it should be perfectly all right.”
Will you be playing numbers from the new album on the tour?
“Yeah – but actually it won`t be the first time we`ll have played them live,” Simon says. “We gave them their debut on two British gigs at Yeovil and Dunstable a short while ago – which we kept quiet about. We just wanted to try them out, you know.
“I expect you can remember the saga at the end of our last British tour – we had to blow out a number of the final dates, because everyone was physically and mentally wiped out, retarded. It was unavoidable.
“We`ve only partially recovered now,” he jokes, “but what with doing the album and having to have a break, we`ve only had the chance to do two of the cancelled gigs. We did virtually the whole of the new album on those dates together with a few of the old numbers. It worked really well – we were so enthusiastic about doing new numbers that the old ones sounded fresher as well.”

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BOMBS

Hawkwind have so far been unable to equal `Silver Machine`s` singles chart success. You may remember the band voluntarily withdrew their follow-up single `Urban Guerilla` from the shops just as it was about to break into the charts because of political implications – bombs were being planted all around the country at the time. A noble gesture, but one that in the end proved harmful for the band: the newest single, `Kings Of Speed`, seems to have flopped rather badly.
“Never mind, I didn`t like the number anyway,” admits Simon. “Apparently, we had to do a single to fulfill our record contract, but really we don`t know how to make them. A band like Sweet, for example, can go into a studio and turn out great three minute singles. I`m not a Sweet fan, but give credit where credit`s due, most of their singles work well.
“We`re not singles-minded, we can`t do things in their way. If Sweet had done `Kings Of Speed` then maybe it would have been a hit – but when we laid the number down we felt like, well, we had to do it, so let`s get it out of the way as soon as possible.”
Last time I talked to Simon, he seemed quite enthusiastic about the single. Why the change of heart?

SPEED

“Well at one point I was quite into doing the number, I was quite into getting a few things done. `Kings Of Speed` could have been okay, I suppose, but really it was a case of `too many cooks`. People kept on saying to us that it had to have this, had to have that. In the end the band didn`t want to know. It got released, and it just got overlooked. I wasn`t bothered at all, you know?”
I thought the single did fairly well – it may even still be a breaker.
“Maybe, I don`t know. I wasn`t even aware it had been released for some time. A lot of people say to you that the band could really do with another hit single, and all the rest of it. Well okay, maybe we do. I don`t think we do, but I might be wrong. I probably am.
“After all, Chelsea got relegated and I thought they were going to win the league.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!
This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Back Street Crawler, Mallard, Leo Sayer, Mud, Jet, Average White Band, Al Green, Ray Charles, Chinn and Chapman, Hawkwind, Slade, Genesis, Dr. Hook, Helen Reddy, Alex Harvey, Bachman Turner Overdrive, Bill Munroe, Kraftwerk, Kinks.
The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT The A-Z of Heavy Metal FROM SOUNDS (Part 4), April 26, 1975

So, as mentioned before, this concludes this series as I don`t have the next number of Sounds which ended with bands up to the letter Z.
I guess the two journalists in question here would correct a couple of things if they had the chance… among them the name of Kiss`s second album and the very strange omission of a band like Led Zeppelin in this article. They may not have been “metal” enough, but then some other bands shouldn`t be here too.
Read on!

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Rock from `eavy to `umble or
The Sounds A – Z of Heavy Metal

Compiled by Pete Makowski and Geoff Barton

H

Hardstuff

A hard rocking unit who recorded two albums on the Purple label (`Bullet Proof` and `Bolex Demtia`) then split. The band consisted of John Cann (guitar), ex-Atomic Rooster bassist John Gustafson and Paul Hammond (drums).

Hawkwind

You know the Hawks. Been together for years, once a people`s band, latterly spaced-out cosmic trippers with a diverting light show. Heavy as an asteroid; loud as a rocket blast; entertaining as a sci-fi novel. Their albums on UA are all readily available: `Hawkwind`, `In Search Of Space` (a classic), `Doremi Fasol Latido`, `Space Ritual` and `Hall Of The Mountain Grill`. Freak hit was `Silver Machine`. Follow-up `Urban Guerilla` was almost a success, too, but got deleted because of political implications. Current effort, `Kings Of Speed`, is the plague of the SOUNDS office.

Heavy Metal Kids

Came shortly after Silverhead and had that same punk rock appeal about them. Headed by mouthpiece Gary Holton they have been progressively building a strong following although their debut album on Atlantic didn`t sell as well as expected. Since then Micky Waller (ex Jeff Beck drummer) has left to form his own band and the band have changed their name to the Kids.

Hendrix

If the Troggs took Chip Taylor`s `Wild Thing` and made it kind of sleazy, Jimi Hendrix took it and gave it a sense of menace – which is why Makowski decides to include Hendrix but exclude the Troggs from this exhaustive list. One presumes. When Hendrix was on he was magnificent – one of the few men who could take the solo guitar and make it sound so good it didn`t need another instrument within a thousand miles. He could also be unbearably tiresome, over-extending licks and riffs until they bled white. But who else could have taken `Star Spangled Banner` and made it work for young America?

Humble Pie

At one time the Pie looked like strong contenders for the rock and roll throne the Stones had been so comfortably sitting on. They had a hard rhythmic style to put them in that league. The band were formed in `68. The combination of Steve Marriott, both from huge groups of that era (the Small Faces and the Herd respectively), sealed the band`s success from the start. Ex Art and Spooky Tooth bassist Greg Ridley and Jerry Shirley completed the line up. Their move to A&M from Immediate in 1970 coincided with a transition in the band`s style, a more aggressive brutal sound. This plus their consistent roadwork led to their imminent success in States and this country (they released three albums during this period `Humble Pie`, `Rock On` and `Live At The Fillmore`). It was obvious that Frampton and Marriott were taking two opposite musical directions and this led with the departure of the former who went to form his own band – Camel, who are still recording on the A&M label. The Pie took on the guitar services of ex Bakerloo, Colosseum man Dave Clempson. The band`s sound became more basic, the `white man soul` vocals of Marriott came to the forefront and they produced one killer of an album titled `Smokin“ in `72. This was followed by three less inspiring efforts (Eat It`, `Thunderbox` and `Streets Rats`) and the band are in the process of splitting.

Hustler

Formerly Flesh, this band first made their mark at the Marquee club where they built up a strong following. The line up then consisted of Steve Haynes (vocals), Micky Lluelyn (guitar), Kenny Lyons (bass), Kenny Daughters (organ) and Tony Beard (drums). They recorded their debut album last year on the Firefly label called `High Street` produced by ex Vinegar Joe guitar player Pete Gage. Since then the band have seen the departure of Beard who has been replaced by ex Tundra man Henry Spinetti.

Hydra

Out of the same camp as the Allmans/Marshall Tucker/Wet Willie, the guitar of Spencer Kirkpatrick and vocalist Wayne Bruce make this band a powerful, up front outfit. A four piece with only one album to their credit but worth watching. A big reputation down South.

I

Iggy Pop

He emulated his heroes – Jagger and the Doors – with unrestrained and exaggerated vigour. A showman supreme, he got a band together in his Ann Arbor home town in `69. Their sheer punk rock enthusiasm made up for their lack of musical skill, but essentially they were a live band and their albums sounded empty save a couple of songs that just happened to work. They recorded two albums on Elektra (`The Stooges` produced by ex Velvet John Cale, and `Funhouse`). Later Bowie produced them (`Raw Power`) an improvement, it was hailed by critics, but Iggy mysteriously disappeared and has had an uneven career since.

Iron Butterfly

Iron Butterfly are, arguably, the most successful, as far as record sales go, of all heavy bands. Their album `In-A-Gadda-Vida` shifted an incredible amount of copies and was just about the Sixties most successful album – it was the first to be awarded a platinum disc and stayed in the US charts for 140 weeks (Butterfly sold, in all, some seven million albums in that decade). They began in San Diego in 1966 and recorded their first album `Iron Butterfly – Heavy` within a year. Six albums were released by the band and all hit the US charts. Their original line up was Erik Braunn guitar, Lee Dorman bass, Ron Bushy drums and Doug Ingle organ and vocals. Later Braunn was replaced by two guitarists, Mike Pinera and Larry Reinhardt. They were basically a heavy blues based outfit with an irritating penchant for electronic gimmickry. Ingle, the band`s leader, had an eerie vocal style which became their trademark. Butterfly have recently reformed with two original members, Braunn and Bushy, and two new members, Phil Kramer bass and vocals, Howard Reitzes keyboards and vocals. They have an album, `Scorching Beauty`, out currently on MCA. It`s marginally better/worse than anything they`ve done before, depending on which way you look at it.

J

James Gang

Formed in Cleveland, Ohio the original band consisted of Joe Walsh (guitar, keyboards, vocals), Jimmy Fox (drums) and Dale Peters (bass). The band produced a versatile range of what could be described as tasteful rock and roll. Walsh`s musical ambitions led to his departure and current solo successes after four albums (`Yer Album`, `Rides Again`, `Thirds`, `Live In Concert`). The remaining two employed the talents of Dominic Trojano for two albums (`Strait Shooter` and `Passin` Thru`), then left to record a solo album and is currently with The Guess Who. He was replaced by Denver guitarist Tommy Bolin and they have recorded two albums (`Gang Bang` and `Miami`). Now they`re a good rock band but nowhere near the standards of the original Walsh line-up.

Jo Jo Gunne

They never managed to sustain the success they had with their first single `Run, Run, Run`. The band was formed by two ex Spirit members Jay Ferguson (keyboards) and John Locke (bass). After three albums guitarist Matthew Andes left to be replaced by John Stahaley (formerly Spirit and Stahaley Brothers).

Judas Priest

Birmingham five piece who look like they could step into Sabbath`s shoes judging by the response they`ve been getting on tour. They have an album out on Gull records and are currently working on new product.

K

Kiss

Rock and roll meets Hammer films. Kiss have tried to combine glamour, horrorock, showmanship… if there was a drink comparable to their mixture of styles you`d have to have a strong stomach to hold it down. The band consists of Peter Criss (drums), Gene Simmons (guitar), Paul Stanley (guitar), Space Age Frehley (lead guitar) and they`ve recorded three albums (`Kiss`, `Nothing To Lose`, `Dressed To Kill`) on the Casablanca label.

L

Love Sculpture

Featuring Dave Edmunds and a bit bemused when their heavying-up of `Sabre Dance` was Number One here in 1967, they were “A local band that was never meant to be” according to their leader. They toured America because it was a good way to get their air fares paid, but split up when they got home. What really put the cap on it was when they found themselves topping the bill over Joe Cocker. They thought the joke had gone far enough.

Lynyrd Skynyrd

Seven piece Skynyrd have taken the States by storm over the last couple of years, their first album setting some non-Southern dudes back on their heels. Three guitars lead the Skynyrd attack but from evidence of their last (third) album they`ve taken their foot off the gas a bit.

M

Mahogany Rush

When Frank Marino was only fourteen years old, he had a bum trip. When he recovered in hospital he discovered he had suddenly acquired an adeptness for playing the guitar, he could play the solo on Garcias `Viola Blues` note for note even though he never heard it before. Then Hendrix overtook his style.

May Blitz

Headed by ex-Jeff Beck drummer Tony Newman, this band were given a lot of promo but didn`t live up to it. They recorded two albums on the Vertigo label (`May Blitz`, `2nd Of May`) and split.

MC5

`Brothers and sisters! I wanna see your hands up there! Lemme see your hands! I wanna hear some revolution out there brothers! I wanna hear a little revolution! It`s time to move! It`s time to testify! And I wanna know – are you ready to testify? Are you ready? I give a testimonial – the MC5!` So begins one of rock`s heaviest (if not the heaviest) live albums, the Motor City Five`s `Kick Out The Jams`. The band had several albums released over here on both the Elektra and Atlantic labels, but all have long since been deleted. The only MC5 material currently readily (or easily) available is a track on the `Age Of Atlantic` sampler album, `Tonight`. Brief facts: the band originated in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in the early/middle Sixties; their trademark: unsubtle, unsophisticated, often barely competent metal which assaulted you (both live and on record even at the most moderate volume) with the force of a fragmentation bomb and the intensity of a dentist`s drill; they were extremely politically orientated, turning up and gigging at many a revolutionary, extremist party rally; Rob Tyner, vocalist, was (and probably still is) the epitome of the perpetually screaming, practically out of tune rock singer. The MC5 once proted Norman Mailer to write a particularly gruesome account of one of their concerts. It`s a fact not too widely known that the jingle for Noel Edmonds` jolly `Kick Out The Jams` spot in his morning show comes from the album of the same name, except that it`s cleverly censored: the MC5 scream, `and right now it`s time to – kick out the jams, mother fuckers!`, while Noel has sensibly toned this down for his listeners and inserted `brothers and sisters` for the offensive final word.

Montrose

American band featuring ex- Edgar Winter sideman and sessionist Ronnie Montrose on blistering guitar. First album, released in 1973, was a rocker from end to end. Curiously, the band (at least on the two occasions I`ve seen them) fail to match up to their recorded sounds in live performance. Original line-up: Ronnie Montrose guitar, Sam Hagar vocals, Bill Church bass, Denny Carmassi drums. Alan Fitzgerald replaced Church for the second album `Paper Money` and Hagar recently left to form his own band, Sammy Wilde And The Dust Cloud. A new vocalist has not yet been announced, though Montrose is still intact.

Mott The Hoople

Mott the Hoople were always a schizophrenic band. Being the brainchild of Guy Stevens, they couldn`t have been anything but – he wanted a group that merged the Rolling Stones with Procol Harum. So their early albums zigzagged from manic, bad tempered thrash to reflective ballads – a quality that wasn`t reflected in the anarchy of their invariably shambolic live gigs. Finally, they gave up and split up. Then Bowie, `Dudes` and success. But Mott had always been a loser band, stumbling from one crisis to the next, and they remained so – once the original line-up split (Mick Ralphs and Verden Allen moving on ultimately to Bad Company and Cheeks) and the permutations of guitarists and keyboardmen started, the rot had set in. They fizzled out with Ian Hunter unable and unwilling to carry on as the group lynchpin any more. His solo career continues with the last Mott guitarist, ex-Spider, Mick Ronson, on another schizoid course; while the Mott remnants are about to record their first album with a new (secret) singer and guitarist. The future is uncertain as ever the past was.

Mountain

If Cream had never existed it`s doubtful that Mountain would have followed. Felix Pappalardi (Cream producer and bassist in his own right) pulled together the talents of Leslie West (guitar), formerly with a band called the Vagrants, Corky Laing (drums) and Steve Knight (keyboards) and broke really big in America but couldn`t repeat the feat in Britain. Felix had a great influence on Cream in the studio and some of these themes were much evident in albums such as `Nantucket Sleighride` and `Flowers Of Evil`. The band split in 1972 and spawned West, Bruce and Laing but reformed following the WB&L collapse only to work sporadically. Best albums vie between `Nantucket` and `Climbing`.

N

Nazareth

A dynamic rock and roll four piece (Dan McCafferty, vocals, Manny Charlton, guitar, Pete Agnew, bass, Darryl Sweet, drums) from Dunfermline didn`t take off until the release of their third album `Razamanaz`. This was followed by chart appearances (`Broken Down Angel`, `This Flight Tonight`). Their next two albums (`Loud `n` Proud` and `Rampant`) sold well but their popularity waned in Britain when they concentrated their energies abroad where they are in the big league. The band have returned in powerful form with `Hair Of The Dog` which was produced by Charlton (the previous three were produced by ex-Purple man Roger Glover).

New York Dolls

`Too Much, Too Soon` was an appropriate title for their second album, the Dolls never quite seemed to make it. Visually and musically they were meant to represent New Yawk debauchery, the kid of the street sound. The band – David Johansen (vocals), Johnny Thunders (guitar), Sylvain Sylvain (bass) and Jerry Nolan (drums) – built a large following at Max`s Kansas City which captured the heart of the critics but were limited in their audience appeal (mainly confined to areas that were attracted by glitter rock).

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frank Zappa, Gladys Knight, Women In Rock, Betty Wright, Steve Harley, Peter Frampton, Labelle, Peter Skellern, Ray Davies, Larry Uttal, Chris Spedding, Anne Murray, Sweet Sensation, Bernard Purdie, Mike Harding, Ronnie Lane, Yes.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT The A-Z of Heavy Metal FROM SOUNDS (Part 3), April 26, 1975

And we continue with part 3 in these series. I must admit that I didn`t know all these bands/artist before reading about them here. Funny how some fell by the wayside and others became household names.
Read on!

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Rock from `eavy to `umble or
The Sounds A – Z of Heavy Metal

Compiled by Pete Makowski and Geoff Barton

D

Deep Purple

Originally the band sounded like the culmination of all the things that Vanilla Fudge had striven for. Elaborate arrangements, well played rock. The band was formed by ex Artwoods and Flowerpot man Jon Lord, Ritchie Blackmore (ex Screaming Lord Sutch, Neil Christians and the Crusaders) and former Searcher Chris Curtis in `68. Curtis left and was replaced by bass player Nick Simper plus the addition of vocalist Rod Evans. The band recorded three albums with this format – `Shades Of Deep Purple`, `Book Of Talysein` and `Deep Purple`. Evans split to the States to form Captain Beyond with ex-Iron Butterfly guitarist Mike Pinera and Bobby Caldwell. Simper went on to join Warhorse. Simper and Evans were replaced by Roger Glover and Ian Gillan respectively. They recorded `In Rock` in 1970, and the distinct sound of Blackmore`s piercing, innovative guitar style that took Hank Marvin`s tremelo one step further, plus the screaming banshee vocals of Gillan made this THE definitive progressive rock album. Purple rose from the underground following when they achieved commercial success (`Black Night`, Strange Kind Of Woman` and `Fireball`). They achieved gargantuan popularity in the States with `Machine Head` which was the top selling US album in `73. An album later Gillan and Glover split and the future of the band was dubious, but they went on and added unknown vocalist Dave Coverdale and ex Trapeze bassist Glenn Hughes. This made for a change in the band`s music, but not in the impetus of their success.

Deviants

While the rest of the world was dressing up in beads and kaftans, Mick Farren and the Social Deviants, taking their cue from the MC5, hopped into their leathers and became a street punk rock politico band. In other words, they bashed it out loud and had titles like `Let`s Loot The Supermarket`. They were born in Spring 1967 with Farren, Duncan Sanderson and Russ Hunter as the core and the fluctuating guitar team of Paul Rudolf and Sid Bishop. By the end of `67 they`d dropped the social bit (well, says Farren, “it was a bit long and cumbersome to say”) and they broke up during a tour of America in 1969. Russ and Sandy joined up with Twink and Rudolf in the Pink Fairies. The Deviants left behind three albums – `Ptoof`, `Disposable` and `Deviants`. The Pink Fairies were worthy successors, but they too are defunct now. Paul Rudolf now has The Paul Rudolf Bugs Bunny Drugs Band.

E

Eire Apparent

Eire Apparent is notable for two things – the presence of guitarist Henry McCullogh, subsequently with the Grease Band, Wings, and, occasionally, Frankie Miller and the production of Jimi Hendrix. One Buddah single, `Rock`n`Roll Band` shows just how well the combination worked.

F

Fanny

This four piece all girl group stripped away all the pre-conceived chauvinistic views of women in rock. They could hit as hard as a battering ram. Formed in California the original line up consisted of June Millington (guitar/vocals), Jean Millington (bass/vocals), Alice De Buhr (drums) and Nickey Barclay (keyboards/vocals). The popularity of this band opened a market for other female rock bands (Isis, Birtha, Mother Trucker). June Millington was the first to leave the band and was replaced by Suzi Quatro`s sister Patti. Nickey Barclay, who was the band`s main writer, left last year to form her own band, Good News.

Foghat

Energy laden, blues based rock and roll laced with glamour. Foghat were one of those bands, like Climax Chicago, struck big in America but haven`t even created a ripple of interest in this country. The original band were ex-Savoy Brown members Rod Price (guitar), Tony Stevens (bass), and Roger Earl (drums). They were soon joined by `Lonesome` Dave Peverett on guitar. They have recorded three successful albums (`Rock & Roll`, `Energized`, `Rock And Roll Outlaws`), on Bearsville label and recently Tony Stevens left to be replaced by Nick Jameson.

Andy Fraser Band

Fraser surfaced with a new band following Sharks and an aborted liaison with Frankie Miller – Nick Judd on keyboards, Kim Turner on drums and Fraser on lead bass and vocals. They`re the loudest I`ve heard in a long time and as cocky and as unsubtle as you like.

Fusion Orchestra

Later re-titled Jill Saward`s Fusion Orchestra, this band is not so much heavy as flashy, visually and musically. When last seen, Jill would whirl dervish-like from instrument to instrument as if seeking an electric Holy Grail. A somewhat frenzied band, in which the drummer has been known to do a solo stretching from one end of the hall to the other.

G

Brian Gamage And The Spikes

Issued a single, `Brain Damage`, in mid-1974. It featured a guitar solo played by hurling a meathook at a highly amplified Stratocaster. The band were first formed in 1963 and the current, ever-changing line-up stands at Brian Gamage vocals, Carole Lewis bugle (the only two remaining original members), Arthur Boonstock harpsichord and Ollibund Socket assorted tympani. Their long-awaited album `Blue Funk` is set for release in the distant future.

J. Geils

Energised R&B driven by the `Wolfman Jack` type vocals of ex-art student and disc jockey Peter Wolf and the screaming mouth-iron, courtesy of Magic Dick. This band of Americanos started life in `67 by Wolf and drummer Steven Bladd. The rest of the band – Danny Klein (bass), Seth Justman (keyboards), J. Geils (guitar) and Magic Dick Salwitz were picked up from a technical engineering college. They started out as a gritty, down to earth boogie band. Their last two albums (`Ladies Invited` and `Nightmares` – on the Atlantic label) were a little more sophisticated. Still a premier live act.

Geordie

Brash Newcastle band, formed in early 1972. Powerful stage act, had some success with the singles `Don`t Do That` and `All Because Of You` – the latter a blatant rip-off of all (at that time) current singles styles, notably Bolan`s `Solid Gold Easy Action`, but great fun all the same. Toured with Slade, have made two albums, `Hope You Like It` and `Don`t Be Fooled By The Name`. Line-up: Brian Johnson vocals, Vic Malcolm guitar, Tom Hill bass, Brian Gibson drums.

Golden Earring

Dutch band, guitarist George Kooymans formed it in 1965 as a bubblegum outfit. Gradually became influenced by early Sixties styles and developed into musically excellent, visually superb band but without much originality. They first came to Britain in 1973 in the wake of Focus` success and soon notched up a hit single, `Radar Love`, and an album, `Moontan`. Current efforts, `Kill Me (Ce Soir)` and `Switch` are disappointing – the band seem to have become too preoccupied with their flashy image.

Groundhogs

The archetypal heavy rock three piece, the Groundhogs originally derived their familiar sound in `68. They were a four piece blues band, but after the departure of vocalist Stephen Rye, Tony McPhee took over and in 1970, two albums later, they established their niche with `Thank Christ For The Bomb` which with the followup `Split` could be described as their definitive product. The moody hard edged sound of the band along with Tony McPhee`s sad sounding `droney` vocals made this mob a popular gigging band. In 1972 after the release of `Who Will Save The World`, drummer Ken Pusteinik left to be replaced by ex-Egg drummer Clive Brooks. This is when McPhee`s guitar and songwriting completely took over and after `Hogwash` he recorded a solo album in 1973 – `The Two Sides Of Tony `T.S.` McPhee`.

Grand Funk

Detroit punk rock at 14,000 watts. GFR were the first of the Teeny bop heavy rock gladiators. Originally put together by ex-Detroit disc jockey Terry Knight in late `69, Don Brewer (drums) and Mark Farner (guitar) were formerly from his backing band the Pack. They got Mel Scacher from Question Mark & The Mysterians. Funk went straight to the open air festivals, their main assets being volume and energy, and soon captured the hearts of a new generation of kids. The band suddenly became a monster (their fifth album `Survival` sold a million on the day of release) they became a liberated status symbol to the masses of teenagers who weren`t interested in The Cream or the Beatles. The band had produced their own album `Phoenix` after splitting from Knight and in fact rose back from the ashes and back into the charts. They added ex-Pack organist Craig Frost to their line up and their next two albums were produced by whiz kid Todd Rundgren.

Gun, Three Man Army, Baker-Gurvitz Army

Lots of Gurvitz brothers for your money. `Polecat Woman` is about the best thing they`ve done and is available on `Three Man Army Two`. The B-G Army sound promising.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frank Zappa, Gladys Knight, Women In Rock, Betty Wright, Steve Harley, Peter Frampton, Labelle, Peter Skellern, Ray Davies, Larry Uttal, Chris Spedding, Anne Murray, Sweet Sensation, Bernard Purdie, Mike Harding, Ronnie Lane, Yes.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

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