Geordie

ARTICLE ABOUT The A-Z of Heavy Metal FROM SOUNDS (Part 3), April 26, 1975

And we continue with part 3 in these series. I must admit that I didn`t know all these bands/artist before reading about them here. Funny how some fell by the wayside and others became household names.
Read on!

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Rock from `eavy to `umble or
The Sounds A – Z of Heavy Metal

Compiled by Pete Makowski and Geoff Barton

D

Deep Purple

Originally the band sounded like the culmination of all the things that Vanilla Fudge had striven for. Elaborate arrangements, well played rock. The band was formed by ex Artwoods and Flowerpot man Jon Lord, Ritchie Blackmore (ex Screaming Lord Sutch, Neil Christians and the Crusaders) and former Searcher Chris Curtis in `68. Curtis left and was replaced by bass player Nick Simper plus the addition of vocalist Rod Evans. The band recorded three albums with this format – `Shades Of Deep Purple`, `Book Of Talysein` and `Deep Purple`. Evans split to the States to form Captain Beyond with ex-Iron Butterfly guitarist Mike Pinera and Bobby Caldwell. Simper went on to join Warhorse. Simper and Evans were replaced by Roger Glover and Ian Gillan respectively. They recorded `In Rock` in 1970, and the distinct sound of Blackmore`s piercing, innovative guitar style that took Hank Marvin`s tremelo one step further, plus the screaming banshee vocals of Gillan made this THE definitive progressive rock album. Purple rose from the underground following when they achieved commercial success (`Black Night`, Strange Kind Of Woman` and `Fireball`). They achieved gargantuan popularity in the States with `Machine Head` which was the top selling US album in `73. An album later Gillan and Glover split and the future of the band was dubious, but they went on and added unknown vocalist Dave Coverdale and ex Trapeze bassist Glenn Hughes. This made for a change in the band`s music, but not in the impetus of their success.

Deviants

While the rest of the world was dressing up in beads and kaftans, Mick Farren and the Social Deviants, taking their cue from the MC5, hopped into their leathers and became a street punk rock politico band. In other words, they bashed it out loud and had titles like `Let`s Loot The Supermarket`. They were born in Spring 1967 with Farren, Duncan Sanderson and Russ Hunter as the core and the fluctuating guitar team of Paul Rudolf and Sid Bishop. By the end of `67 they`d dropped the social bit (well, says Farren, “it was a bit long and cumbersome to say”) and they broke up during a tour of America in 1969. Russ and Sandy joined up with Twink and Rudolf in the Pink Fairies. The Deviants left behind three albums – `Ptoof`, `Disposable` and `Deviants`. The Pink Fairies were worthy successors, but they too are defunct now. Paul Rudolf now has The Paul Rudolf Bugs Bunny Drugs Band.

E

Eire Apparent

Eire Apparent is notable for two things – the presence of guitarist Henry McCullogh, subsequently with the Grease Band, Wings, and, occasionally, Frankie Miller and the production of Jimi Hendrix. One Buddah single, `Rock`n`Roll Band` shows just how well the combination worked.

F

Fanny

This four piece all girl group stripped away all the pre-conceived chauvinistic views of women in rock. They could hit as hard as a battering ram. Formed in California the original line up consisted of June Millington (guitar/vocals), Jean Millington (bass/vocals), Alice De Buhr (drums) and Nickey Barclay (keyboards/vocals). The popularity of this band opened a market for other female rock bands (Isis, Birtha, Mother Trucker). June Millington was the first to leave the band and was replaced by Suzi Quatro`s sister Patti. Nickey Barclay, who was the band`s main writer, left last year to form her own band, Good News.

Foghat

Energy laden, blues based rock and roll laced with glamour. Foghat were one of those bands, like Climax Chicago, struck big in America but haven`t even created a ripple of interest in this country. The original band were ex-Savoy Brown members Rod Price (guitar), Tony Stevens (bass), and Roger Earl (drums). They were soon joined by `Lonesome` Dave Peverett on guitar. They have recorded three successful albums (`Rock & Roll`, `Energized`, `Rock And Roll Outlaws`), on Bearsville label and recently Tony Stevens left to be replaced by Nick Jameson.

Andy Fraser Band

Fraser surfaced with a new band following Sharks and an aborted liaison with Frankie Miller – Nick Judd on keyboards, Kim Turner on drums and Fraser on lead bass and vocals. They`re the loudest I`ve heard in a long time and as cocky and as unsubtle as you like.

Fusion Orchestra

Later re-titled Jill Saward`s Fusion Orchestra, this band is not so much heavy as flashy, visually and musically. When last seen, Jill would whirl dervish-like from instrument to instrument as if seeking an electric Holy Grail. A somewhat frenzied band, in which the drummer has been known to do a solo stretching from one end of the hall to the other.

G

Brian Gamage And The Spikes

Issued a single, `Brain Damage`, in mid-1974. It featured a guitar solo played by hurling a meathook at a highly amplified Stratocaster. The band were first formed in 1963 and the current, ever-changing line-up stands at Brian Gamage vocals, Carole Lewis bugle (the only two remaining original members), Arthur Boonstock harpsichord and Ollibund Socket assorted tympani. Their long-awaited album `Blue Funk` is set for release in the distant future.

J. Geils

Energised R&B driven by the `Wolfman Jack` type vocals of ex-art student and disc jockey Peter Wolf and the screaming mouth-iron, courtesy of Magic Dick. This band of Americanos started life in `67 by Wolf and drummer Steven Bladd. The rest of the band – Danny Klein (bass), Seth Justman (keyboards), J. Geils (guitar) and Magic Dick Salwitz were picked up from a technical engineering college. They started out as a gritty, down to earth boogie band. Their last two albums (`Ladies Invited` and `Nightmares` – on the Atlantic label) were a little more sophisticated. Still a premier live act.

Geordie

Brash Newcastle band, formed in early 1972. Powerful stage act, had some success with the singles `Don`t Do That` and `All Because Of You` – the latter a blatant rip-off of all (at that time) current singles styles, notably Bolan`s `Solid Gold Easy Action`, but great fun all the same. Toured with Slade, have made two albums, `Hope You Like It` and `Don`t Be Fooled By The Name`. Line-up: Brian Johnson vocals, Vic Malcolm guitar, Tom Hill bass, Brian Gibson drums.

Golden Earring

Dutch band, guitarist George Kooymans formed it in 1965 as a bubblegum outfit. Gradually became influenced by early Sixties styles and developed into musically excellent, visually superb band but without much originality. They first came to Britain in 1973 in the wake of Focus` success and soon notched up a hit single, `Radar Love`, and an album, `Moontan`. Current efforts, `Kill Me (Ce Soir)` and `Switch` are disappointing – the band seem to have become too preoccupied with their flashy image.

Groundhogs

The archetypal heavy rock three piece, the Groundhogs originally derived their familiar sound in `68. They were a four piece blues band, but after the departure of vocalist Stephen Rye, Tony McPhee took over and in 1970, two albums later, they established their niche with `Thank Christ For The Bomb` which with the followup `Split` could be described as their definitive product. The moody hard edged sound of the band along with Tony McPhee`s sad sounding `droney` vocals made this mob a popular gigging band. In 1972 after the release of `Who Will Save The World`, drummer Ken Pusteinik left to be replaced by ex-Egg drummer Clive Brooks. This is when McPhee`s guitar and songwriting completely took over and after `Hogwash` he recorded a solo album in 1973 – `The Two Sides Of Tony `T.S.` McPhee`.

Grand Funk

Detroit punk rock at 14,000 watts. GFR were the first of the Teeny bop heavy rock gladiators. Originally put together by ex-Detroit disc jockey Terry Knight in late `69, Don Brewer (drums) and Mark Farner (guitar) were formerly from his backing band the Pack. They got Mel Scacher from Question Mark & The Mysterians. Funk went straight to the open air festivals, their main assets being volume and energy, and soon captured the hearts of a new generation of kids. The band suddenly became a monster (their fifth album `Survival` sold a million on the day of release) they became a liberated status symbol to the masses of teenagers who weren`t interested in The Cream or the Beatles. The band had produced their own album `Phoenix` after splitting from Knight and in fact rose back from the ashes and back into the charts. They added ex-Pack organist Craig Frost to their line up and their next two albums were produced by whiz kid Todd Rundgren.

Gun, Three Man Army, Baker-Gurvitz Army

Lots of Gurvitz brothers for your money. `Polecat Woman` is about the best thing they`ve done and is available on `Three Man Army Two`. The B-G Army sound promising.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Frank Zappa, Gladys Knight, Women In Rock, Betty Wright, Steve Harley, Peter Frampton, Labelle, Peter Skellern, Ray Davies, Larry Uttal, Chris Spedding, Anne Murray, Sweet Sensation, Bernard Purdie, Mike Harding, Ronnie Lane, Yes.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Geordie FROM SOUNDS, October 13, 1973

A really good one for fans of Geordie or maybe of Brian Johnson in AC/DC. This one have some interesting thoughts from Brian at the end of the interview.
Band leader Vic Malcolm was the great songwriter of this band and he was still writing great rock music as late as in 2014 with his band called “Dynamite”. If you like no-nonsense rock`n`roll in the style of AC/DC, this is the band for you. Check them out here: https://youtu.be/cOu1BJy4GLk

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Don`t be fooled by the name

By Ray Telford

Brian Johnson, Brian Gibson and Tom Hill when they`re together never stay quiet for very long.
Last week they were assembled at their manager`s office for a swift interview before it was time to go on to Lansdowne recording studios where the finishing touches are being added to the new Geordie album. Absent from the little gathering was the groups mainspring Vic Malcolm who Brian Johnson explained had virtually been living at Lansdowne the past couple of days “Just to make sure everything`s being done right”.
The two Brians and Tom, when they`re in good shape, virtually terrorise their manager`s clerical staff and their young, unsuspecting PR man into fetching cups of tea and satisfactory publicity shots respectively: “If that gets used in the paper Molina, I`ll bloody well sue you”, Tom Hill forewarned the PR man who in turn said nothing but slipped the offending pic into an envelope and handed it over to me to use if I so cared. The whole thing, though, was carried out in good, clean cat and mouse type fun which is the norm whenever any of the Geordie`s are around.
Before being asked to join the group by Vic Malcolm little more than a year ago Brian Johnson had never played a pro gig with a group in his life, though he`d been with a long string of semi-pro Newcastle groups and had got himself a healthy reputation as a rock vocalist: “Vic came to my house one night”, Brian carried on through his undiluted goerdie accent, “He said he liked my singing and all that but he said I just stood there like a sack of tatties. That`s what he said. Anyway, after I joined the whole stage thing came very easy to me. I get up to things on stage now that I`d never dreamed of a couple of years ago.”

It might be a fair guess to say that Geordie`s apparently unbounded enthusiasm and love for the music business could well be down to the fact that they have achieved no mean measure of success in a comparatively short space of time. In the past year, they`ve released four singles, all of which notched up impressive sales: “The first single to break for us, which was `You Can`t Do That`, broke the bottom end of the charts towards the end of last year. At that time we had a lot of really good luck – good gigs, the ones which matter, and after the discos had picked up on the record it spread to the radio and that gave us a lot of exposure.”
Basically Geordie feature mostly Vic Malcolm songs (all the singles have been written by him), and their few diversions into non-group songs have all been given Vic`s arrangements. The immortal “Geordie`s Lost His Liggie” from the first LP, being probably the best example.
“All the songs on the new album,” said Tom Hill, “have been written by Vic, though this time the group have contributed much more in terms of coming up with ideas at recording sessions. The only non-original song we`ve done is “House Of The Rising Sun” which we`re very pleased with. It follows pretty close to the way The Animals did it but our version is a bit heavier – it`s punchier.”
Geordie, much to their disillusionment, still find themselves being compared to Slade more often than they feel is justified. No one disputes the similarity of appeal between the two bands which, when you come to think of it is probably the reason why the two were billed together at a London Palladium concert last year. Of course, at that time Geordie hadn`t yet experienced their first hit. Close listening to the Geordie albums show Vic Malcolm as a talented composer of pop songs plain and simple and his style really is a long way removed from Noddy Holder`s impact which has tended to remain on the same level throughout all the major Slade singles hits. True, the production strokes that are pulled on Geordie`s behalf may discolour the argument but beneath it all they have the feel of a band who deserve their glitter the same as anybody else.

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The next Geordie album following “Don`t Be Fooled By The Name”, Brian J. says, will be a live one. They intend to record it early next year at a gig in Newcastle City Hall, a venue the group have never yet played as their past home appearances have always happened at the cosier Mayfair Ballroom where they have been No. 1 draw for the past year or so.
“A live album,” said Brian, “is something I`ve been looking forward to. There are things we get into on stage musically that have never happened in the studio. There`s this certain song that goes down no bother live but we tried to record for the album last week and I couldn`t hit it. I tried handling it everyway I knew how but it just wasn`t right. Obviously the band is naturally happier playing live than recording, though we record a lot easier than we use to. And to do the live album in Newcastle should be something else.”
Geordie have already had one abortive attempt at an American tour earlier this year. Brian, however, seems in no great rush to reach US audiences because his canny Newcastle common sense tells him: “By all accounts Slade died in America. I hear they went down well in and around New York but outside that area they died. Now if people are comparing us to Slade in this country the chances are we wouldn`t do too good in the States – and that means losing a lot of money.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dave Mattacks, David Crosby, The JSD Band, Phil Manzanera, Status Quo, Jerry Shirley, Sutherland Bros. and Quiver, Jo Jo Gunne, Allan Taylor.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Geordie FROM SOUNDS, March 3, 1973

We are on to a very special issue of Sounds here. Looking through it I realised that I may have to write a record number of articles from this one. It is almost like an early issue of what later became the best rock magazine in the world – “Kerrang” (In the early days). So many nice articles that I`m almost drooling. And we start of with a bit of gold here – an article with the band that later lost their vocalist to what was to be one of the greatest rock bands in the world ever. But they were far away knowing anything about that at the time. Enjoy!

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Perfection`s their thing

By Ray Telford

“A good solid driving beat and lots of pure unadulterated excitement,” was the description put on the new single from Geordie in last week`s SOUNDS by one Gavin Breck in his appraisal of what records would be most likely to turn on the nation`s discotheque customers this year.
As it happens Geordie have already notched up quite a few singles sales with their debut record, “Don`t Do That”, which gained rapid approval on its release in the latter half of last year and as a result planted them firmly in the minds of lovers of no holds barred, undiluted rock.

DISILLUSIONED

The band, a four piece, comprising Vic Malcolm, guitar; Brian Johnson, vocals; Tom Hill, bass and Brian Gibson, drums; were formed by Vic in Newcastle last February. Brian says that, individually, they`d all previously played with various semi-pro lineups in Newcastle but that they`d rapidly become disillusioned with the lack of work in the area available to semi-pro groups: “Then Vic got this band together,” Brian explained, “and suddenly we seemed to be working every night of the week. The change was incredible and we were forced to learn things in literally a matter of weeks what most other bands learn in a year. The single took off very quickly, almost as soon as it was released, because the radio DJs picked up on it and that`s something, I suppose, we should be very thankful for.”

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Brian describes the group`s recent appearance with Slade at the Palladium as the most important gig of their career so far, though he admits their biggest following still centres around the Northern ballrooms and that they`ve yet to consolidate their following: “London,” says Brian, “isn`t the easiest place in the world for a band like us to break in. I know that audiences aren`t so blase as they used to be and that everyone`s into raving a bit more at gigs but the few small London gigs we have played in the last year have been nothing like what we`re used to up North.”
The bulk of Geordie`s repertoire is written by Vic Malcolm who penned both “Don`t Do That” and “All Because Of You”, the group`s new single as well as all the material due for inclusion on their debut album released next month.
The group`s straight pop approach, Brian says, is unlikely to change in favour of anything more musically complex. “When we started playing the Newcastle clubs we had to play a few numbers which weren`t ours because the audiences seemed very wary of bands who played original material but gradually we began to sneak in Vic`s songs until we got to the stage where everything we did was our own and the kids were still going wild.

EXPERIENCE

“In many ways the band is very self-critical and though most of our stuff is simple, straight down the line rock we realise that you`ve still got to keep trying for perfection. It`s something I don`t think many bands really care about but I think we`ve always been pretty conscious of it.”
Of the new single, Brian says it should have more commercial appeal than “Don`t Do That”, though it has a similar feel: “Hit singles are still the only way to get through to the biggest audiences. I think singles are also becoming more and more important to the rock business and you can see that through the number of really good ones that bands are putting out these days. The excitement that surrounds a really good hit single is quite an experience and I hope we`ll be experiencing quite a few in future.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Darryl Way (Curved Air), Sounds staff analyse David Bowie, Nazareth, Steve Marriott, Average White Band, Elton John, Francis Rossi (Status Quo), Slade, Thin Lizzy, Stackridge, Peter Gabriel, Mike Heron, Jesse Winchester.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.