Jerry Gilbert

ARTICLE ABOUT Genesis FROM SOUNDS, June 8, 1974

Genesis started their work on one of their most famous albums around this time, the album later known as “The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway”. At this point the strains in the relationship between Peter Gabriel and the rest of the band started to show. He would leave the band a year later.

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Looking for a back seat role

Peter Gabriel tells Jerry Gilbert about radical changes afoot for Genesis

Peter Gabriel returned from Genesis` recent American tour to take possession of a new house in Bath, and with no particular desire to go back across the water in a hurry.
“It seems like we had one US tour running straight into another and we`ve been away about six months in all, which is too long tours. “It`s not so productive; we come up with quite a lot of (Missing a line here? – Blog Ed.) Genesis was formed initially as a songwriting band back at Charterhouse public school, and the original concept has been lost by long tours. “It`s not so productive; we come up with quite a lot of ideas but it`s the actual growth of the ideas that`s stunted, and now it`s pretty well the same situation as we found ourselves in last year.”
So how does Peter envisage this year turning out? “I want to take more of a back seat role,” he said adamantly. “I hope that there will be opportunities to work with other artists this year.
“It`s not so much a rejection of that role, but Genesis has always been more than a live band in our minds and the other side hasn`t had a chance to be developed. For instance in the States people only know us as a performing band.”
The last two years has seen a complete reversal for Genesis – from being the carefully nurtured Charisma babes, the bulk of whose work was done on the drawing board, to one of the most exciting live bands in the country, especially when they are in full flight.
“We hope to get the chance to write for other people.” Peter went on, “There seems to have been a reversal whereby capable artists are using other people`s material, and I still feel there`s a lot we can do. I mean I think a lot of writers enjoy a much wider range of music than their public or press ever give them credit for.”

Whilst in the States, Peter was invited to take part in a TV chat show with John McLaughlin and the Beach Boys` Mike Love, and McLaughlin was voicing the same opinion about the coverage of good material. The result was that McLaughlin and Love ended up playing “California Girls” along with Charles Lloyd. Peter, it should be noted, did not participate. “Being of nervous disposition and totally overawed by the barrage of electric equipment, I made for the nearest corner on my stool….”
Quite how definite are the individual plans of the group remains to be seen. Peter has often spoken of his wishes to write and record with songwriter Martin Hall, and I brought this up again during the interview. “Yes, it`s a strong possibility. We`ve done a few songs together but not recorded anything.”
The idea, he emphasised, was not to extend egos but simply to provide a nucleus for a variation of ideas. Meanwhile Mike Rutherford is planning a project with the old Genesis guitarist Anthony Phillips.
“We`ve been doing the stooge routine for long enough and we don`t really want to be tied. It`s not a case of `Now I`m going to do my own thing` routine but just the desire to be involved with other people. At the same time we are going into our own album with a strong feeling that a change is about to take place. It`s very easy to repeat your former glories if you think your appeal lies in a certain direction so we are going to work towards avoiding that on this album and introduce things that we haven`t tried before. We really want a radical change.”
And so in the Autumn Genesis plan their British return with a concert tour and a completely new stage act, more than likely another piece of theatrical extravagance destined to make them very little money overall when it comes to the final analysis. How much longer do they plan to throw their tour profits straight back into the hat?
Peter admitted to the frustrations that this situation inevitably induces, especially when they see small bands dividing the spoils at the end of a gig. But he feels that it`s all for the best.

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“When Tony (Smith) takes his management percentage then that`s just about break even point. But the amount of money that changes hands is now greatly up, and the next American tour should put us into a profit area.
“The thing about America is that unless you`re very lucky with radio plays you have to go as many places as possible because everything is localised, so now we`re trying to remodel our tours to the point where we shouldn`t really play in any place twice with the same show. Instead we`d like to play medium size buildings and do about three consecutive nights there – several dates in one town, which would enable us to put on a better show, and then that would be it.”
But the band, like most, encountered their fair share of bad taste in the States. Firstly there was the press reception in Boston (“we`re not the kind of band to have a press reception for anyway”) where someone came up with the bright idea of having the group sit amongst the disciples in a painting of “The Last Supper”, the idea being to have the band flash across Christ`s head with the use of a generator and effects.
Then they had six guitars stolen, and although two were brought back there were some very funny stories going round, says Peter. This was at the Academy of Music, and it was there that Peter made his one and only attempt to “take off” Drury Lane style. The result was that the whole thing backfired, the timing was off and Peter was left out on stage, suspended, ignominiously, in mid-air.
“No-one really knew what they were doing,” he explained, predicting the axing of that particular facet from the show. “Flying was a gimmick – it doesn`t have any great aesthetic significance and I probably won`t do it again.”
Right now Genesis are down in Hindhead – close to where it all began for them some years ago. They`re rehearsing material for their new album at Led Zeppelin`s country retreat, and when they`ve completed their writing period they hope to bring in a mobile unit rightaway. “We might then be able to get some of the ideas down while they`re still fresh because we feel that it`s our one opportunity in the year to record and we`d better make it good!”
Not only good, but by the sounds of things thoroughly unique – a complete departure from all that`s gone before.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bryan Ferry, Captain Beefheart, Jim Capaldi, Lee Jackson, Uriah Heep, Byzantium, Denny Cordell, Ronnie Lane, Blue, Nutz, Arthur Brown, Harry Chapin, Groundhogs.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth FROM SOUNDS, January 19, 1974

This interview was done just before the band travelled to make an album that would end up having one of their most striking album covers, Rampant, released in late April 1974.
The only cover version on this album was “Shapes of Things”, a song that would be “Nazarethified” so much that most people think of it as the band`s own, being a live favourite throughout the years. The album would go to number 1 in Austria and peak at number 3 in my home country Norway, being their best position in the charts of any album released here.

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Shapes of things to come

Jerry Gilbert talks to Nazareth`s Manny Charlton

Manny Charlton is most concerned about Nazareth`s next album. On the eve of the band`s departure to Switzerland he was busy sorting through demo tapes to be played to producer Roger Glover once they all arrived in Montreux to start work on yet another album.
He regards the speed with which the band churn out albums as being essential, not so much for their own peace of mind as to fulfil their contract but at the same time he is very wary as to the direction the next progression should take the band.
This time, it`ll be an all original album which is already 98 per cent complete. The band may then decide to make up with the Yardbirds` “Shapes Of Things” or “There`s A Riot Going On” or even write another track themselves – for the album has been specifically designed to feature new group material.
“I think there will be a widening of the spectrum, doing things that we haven`t done before. We want to be a bit more adventurous, to incorporate the British feel and aggression with the American musicianship. Imagine Little Feat material done by Led Zeppelin, well that`s the sort of thing we`re after”.
After cutting their last two albums at the Gangy in Jamestown, Scotland, they have been forced to move to Montreux late in the day because of the energy crisis. They will be spending two weeks at the Montreux Concert Centre with the Stones Mobile, and with the material mostly in the can, they are hoping for a fairly straightforward time.

“We like to have a good idea of what it`s going to sound like so we do all the demos at home – then we just hope that when we get down to record it, it all comes together but we find that if we have a sketch of it before we go into the studios then Roger Glover will probably add some ideas”.
Manny admitted that it was difficult hitting a two album a year schedule, and as a result their five week Christmas holiday back home in Dunfermline was used as a solid writing and rehearsing period from midday until five, eight until one in the morning.
Once in Switzerland they`ll be anxious to get back to Britain and rehearse a new stage act for the States. By May they`ll be back touring England to coincide with the release of the album which is as yet untitled.
The irony of it all is that the tightness of their schedule prevents them from doing any gigs in Switzerland, which is not only a country that the band have yet to play but also a place where “Loud & Proud” has hit the number one spot.
“Making albums just gets harder all the time because our standards are continually rising”, says Manny, and perhaps the band still aren`t regarded with the kind of musical respect that they deserve. “I do tend to think that people regard us as just another rock band”, he acquiesced. “OK we`re not the Mahavishnu Orchestra but I think we`re pretty competent.

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“Four or five years ago people would have thought a lot more of us, but even so I don`t think we`re classed like Geordie”.
How did he see his own tastes influencing the band musically? Manny is adamant about the bands he likes, and they mostly hail from the States. “I`ve been listening a lot to Joe Walsh lately and I think he`s the ideal musician. I`d love Nazareth to get to the same position as Joe Walsh or Little Feat because we really want to combine good songs with good playing. In terms of solos onstage I like to play a solo as long as it isn`t indulgent. I`m not up there to play guitar to myself and the band feel like that too – we`re just not that type of band, and besides, most of the solos are tightly rehearsed”.
In the meantime the band continue to move up the ladder in the States.
“Let`s just say we`re making progress”, Manny cut in circumspectly. “I think the time has passed when Americans welcome British bands with open arms, so we`re having to work hard. At the same time we don`t want to lose what progress we`ve made in Britain – we don`t want to become like TYA where we`re never in the country”.
In the interim, Mooncrest will be issuing a single of the band – and it will probably be a song written largely by Manny called “Castles In The Sand”. Says Manny: “It`s a Buddy Holly kind of thing along the lines of `Peggy Sue`. We specifically didn`t want this one to be on the album but if it`s a really big single the record company and management will be tempted to put it on the album because singles sell albums”.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Dylan, Jethro Tull, Bryan Ferry, Chris Squire, Rick Wakeman, Paul Butterfield, Sweet, Tim Hardin, Average White Band, Cozy Powell, Robin Dransfield, Andy Roberts.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth (and a bit about Silverhead) FROM SOUNDS, November 17, 1973

A short, but nice concert review. Enjoy!

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Nazareth Concert Review

By Jerry Gilbert

Poor old Nazareth`s gig at the Rainbow about to be turned into a live album, a sell-out show and a party for the group afterwards, and what happens – a performance which in their eyes at least, was fairly sub-standard.
Not that the band themselves were below par, although there were obvious signs of tension early on, but the sound was terrible both in terms of balance and quality.
All in all they must have caused Roger Glover, who was there to produce the live album, a lot of headaches in spite of the fact that they finally drew the desired response from the audience with a tremendous finish.
Basically it was the old dynamic Nazareth – with that beautifully phased opening to “Night Woman” right on through to “Broken Down Angel”, “Bad Bad Boy” and “Woke Up This Morning” with interludes midway through the set to feature Manny Charlton`s ever improving slide playing and a showcase for the new numbers from “Loud `n` Proud” which included “This Flight Tonight”.
Darrell Sweet huffed and puffed and pounded out some tremendous drum work with Pete Agnew hitting the same volume level with extremely percussive use of bass. Dan McCafferty was also right on form, wailing out strained, piercing vocals, and on another night Nazareth would have scored a resounding victory. It was only the atrocious sound which caused them to falter.
Silverhead, on the other hand were tremendously impressive as the young punk band who pull fewer punches by substituting better music to get results these days. They had the audience on their feet clapping before the end of their set and the rivetting display of Michael De Barres, whose timing is so precise, led the band to a stirring conclusion in the shape and form of “Rock And Roll Band” and “Ace Supreme”, a couple of vintage numbers from their first album. A thoroughly absorbing performance.

 

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Nils Lofgren, John Lennon, Free, Ronnie Lane, Ozzy Osbourne, Carlos Santana, Average White Band, Dale ‘Buffin’ Griffin, Magna Carta, Alice Cooper.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth FROM SOUNDS, November 3, 1973

Just a short review today. I think the Naz fans will like this one.

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Album Review

By Jerry Gilbert

Nazareth: “Loud `n` Proud”
(Mooncrest Crest 4)

Nazareth are one of Britain`s brightest bands because they have found an immaculate compromise between genuine American Southern grit and good old English punk rock. That`s not to say that they compromise their music – far from it, but they are loud and have taken another positive step forward with another master production from Roger Glover. I heard his other proteges recently – an American band called Elf – and was highly disappointed all round, but he has certainly turned Nazareth into one of the most dynamic recording bands with his d.i.y. tenet. Like “Razamanaz”, the band have hired the Pye Mobile and recorded the whole thing virtually live in their own rehearsal room in Scotland, and as always their music is basic, earthy, and strays little beyond the demarcation lines of rock and roll. “Go Down Fighting” is almost reminiscent of Gary Glitter and were it not for the fact that they are setting themselves higher standards all the time I`m sure this would be a likely candidate for their next hit single. As it happens they will probably choose the “Turn On Your Receiver”, although my favourite is the track sandwiched between – “Not Fakin` It” which features a compelling riff from Manny Charlton that is really wasted on the song. Elsewhere they do a great version of Little Feat`s “Teenage Nervous Breakdown” and a dubious version of Dylan`s memorable “Ballad Of Hollis Brown” which is so lyrically perfect that any attempts to intensify the song tend to detract from it – or maybe I`ve just heard it too often to tolerate secondary versions. “This Flight Tonight” is a classic example where something from the singer-songwriter genre can be utilised by a rebel rousing rock band although you may care to sample “Child In The Sun”, the more reflective “other” side of Naz as featured spasmodically on “Exercises”. All in all it`s a very fine album indeed – definitely superior to “Razamanaz” but then again one can`t see the band resting on laurels at this stage in their career.

Loud Nazareth

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dicky Betts (Allman Brothers), Alvin Lee and Mylon Lefevre, Humble Pie, Wishbone Ash, Michael Chapman, Ringo Starr, Neil Innes, Genesis, Refugee, Steve Tilston, Groundhogs, Mike Heron, Uriah Heep.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Phil Collins (Genesis) FROM SOUNDS, November 3, 1973

This interview was obviously conducted before there was restrictions on what media could print. Later on the marketing departments of the record companies demanded too much control over what was printed. A press officer today would have had a heart attack if he saw an artist being so frank and outspoken as Collins is in this interview. Shame on you, concert goers from Bournemouth and Southampton! LOL!
OK. Here we go.

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Phil: Showing off his colours

Feature by Jerry Gilbert

Three days before Genesis concluded what appeared to be a highly successful British tour, selling out two concerts at the Rainbow and earning an ovation that any artist would treasure, Phil Collins came out with this surprise announcement: “I don`t know if you get blase but we expected a little more from some places and they just didn`t live up to expectations. The Northern gigs were all good but not Bournemouth or Southampton.

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“The Rainbow was also weird and I didn`t really enjoy either of those gigs although a tape I heard of the Saturday gig sounded a lot better than I remember playing it”.
He also has reservations about their new album “Selling England By The Pound”, feeling that the numbers are only beginning to find their feet onstage now. But this is a problem Genesis have always had – their cycle of event forces them to take several months off to routine a new album and then go straight into the studios to record it before embarking on a tour to promote it which is usually when those numbers come of age. But if there`s one aspect of the band that this tour has pinpointed, it is their ability to play freely, and for the first time we have seen the band split down into units of three (Tony, Phil and Mike) and two (Phil and Mike). In fact Phil has been coming to the fore more and more recently, combining a display of powerhouse drumming with back up vocals, and now his own feature spot in the programme when he sings “More Fool Me” to Mike`s guitar accompaniment.
“We took three months over the last album, and while we were doing it I was doing my own pub gigs with a band (the legendary Zocks) and we may revive that band again. I`m also cutting a single which came about when I demoed some songs for Mike (Rutherford) and Ant Phillips, who used to be in the band. I was just demoing the songs for them but Strat liked what he heard and decided to put it out as a single although I don`t yet know what name it`ll go out under.”

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Phil admitted that Genesis had finally emerged as musicians rather than a bunch of guys who meticulously work out every arrangement over a period of three months and devise strange costumes, props and slides as expletives.
“Everyone has come out better musically and whether it`s born out of frustration or not I don`t know. I don`t think it was a conscious effort, it was just the way it evolved and we hope to bring a lot more things into the band – there are some more percussion things I want to bring in. I mean the more I can get into the band the better I feel and things like `I Know What I Like`, `Dancing With The Moonlight King` and `Aisle Of Plenty` have given me more pleasure playing onstage now because it used to be that somehow I`d be playing better at the soundcheck than I was onstage. We`ve wanted to sound freer, and now, with only three of us onstage, the time changes are easier to pick up.”
But what role does Phil play in the preparation of new material? “Well I come up with ideas, little riffs and things because I play piano and so ideas come out in various pieces though obviously I`m more into the arrangements and the time sequences than chord patterns and lyrics.
“With the new album I feel that the production is much better because `Foxtrot` had been a farcical situation where we had three producers and it wasn`t until we settled down with John Burns to do `Supper`s Ready` that we realised we were getting into something. He thinks that the feeling should come across more than the technique but technique is important too so this time we`ve found a compromise and shown off a few rough edges.”
Phil`s future plans also include an album with Irish singer Eugene Wallace, although right now he is more concerned with preparing for the States` tour which follows shortly. “We want to make a film of a gig for American use also perhaps a `Whistle Test`, because although this is our third visit to the States it`s only our first real tour. The first time was a gamble with a one off thing in New York and I think it was effective.”

FREAKS

At the beginning of next year the band want to undertake a European tour, but more important, they plan to feature a week of concerts at a major London venue – either Edmonton, Hammersmith or the Rainbow. “We could have sold out four Rainbows this time so that`s what we`ll do instead of the Wembley thing we were going to do, because the show is still maturing.
“The thing is there`s a lot to take in at one show and I`m sure there`ll be some freaks who will come all five nights.”
With such an eccentric show, could Genesis ever hope to make money from the British concert circuit? “No. We had to put our ticket prices up this time which is a sad thing to do, but it`s a vicious circle because we can`t go on playing for nothing and getting ourselves into more debt but at the same time we can`t stop doing what we are doing because that`s what the band`s all about. The financial situation is something we never think about because if we did it would depress us. We`re taking all our own stuff across to America so we`ll lose money there too.”
But Phil is adamant about one thing – Genesis will continue to show off more and more of their colours. “There`s a lot in each of us that doesn`t come out in the band. Steve should play his instrumental `Horizons` and he and Tony should do instrumental things. My song came about because we were all going to do feature spots but I was the only one who actually got it together to do something else in the band.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dicky Betts (Allman Brothers), Alvin Lee and Mylon Lefevre, Humble Pie, Wishbone Ash, Michael Chapman, Ringo Starr, Neil Innes, Ken Hensley, Refugee, Steve Tilston, Groundhogs, Mike Heron.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.