Led Zeppelin

ARTICLE ABOUT Robert Plant (Led Zeppelin) FROM NEW MUSICAL EXPRESS, February 14, 1976

I`ve said it before and I`ll say it again: I really like the way this journalist let the interview objects speak to us readers without a lot of interruptions. Even if there is a lot of talk about corners at the end of this.
Have a good read!

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Sensitive Plant pines for British soil

And occasionally New Jersey Shoulder to cry on by St. Laurent of Paris

Reporter: Lisa Robinson

Robert Plant was acting like he didn`t care.
But when I started to tell him what Mick Jagger had said about him, I detected a strong glimmer of interest in his eyes.
“Mick`s been so nice,” Robert said.
He brings you up all the time, I insisted, in a pleasant chiding way of course, things like “should I get a tambourine like Robert Plant.” And more in that vein.
“Actually,” says Plant, “I remember talking to Mick at the Plaza one night, about the sort of separatism, or lack of communication between one rock band and another.
“You know in the old days there was a constant sort of jousting for position, a definite ego number that was apparent all the way up to a certain point. I guess I realized talking to him that there isn`t all this clanship and unity between bands in this rock and roll scene.
“Then, when this accident happened, there was a giant rally round from a lot of people who I never think of that often, you know?
“Wishes and regards sent to Maureen, to us both. From people on all levels of the business, you know.
“It was a really great gesture, it brought a new validity to it somehow, just a great surge of energy. Just at the time that we were both pulling out of the worst of the accident. It was an enlightening thing.
“Maybe in times of need you do get this sort of camaraderie…”

It is obvious that the near fatal car accident suffered by Robert Plant and his family last summer in Greece has affected his life profoundly.
Whether he talks of Led Zeppelin, their new album “Presence”, possible plans for touring, or his wife and children, an awareness of what life means to him since that experience is always at the very front of his mind.
Discussing his “tax exile” status Plant was bitter. Then again, he related it to his situation.
“I really cannot believe the criticism that I`ve had hurled against me, the remarks made by people about leaving my wife when she was in hospital… all that. It`s a very sad situation, you know, to have to leave one`s own country for the sake of money.
“It makes good sense, obviously. That is the motivation for 99 1/2 per cent of the people who have done it. With me well, not only did I want to preserve some of the reward for what I`ve worked like hell for – what I sit racking my brains to try and create – but it was almost the principle of the thing.
“The government in England is almost saying, `Well, never mind, they`ll come back you know… they`re English and they`ll come home`.
“And the loneliest times… just to know that you`re a prisoner… it`s really more sad than any accident to be thrust out of your own country. If the government tried to work out a reasonable deal… but they`re adamant, and sure that `they`ll come back`. And they`re damn right… the number of times we have come so close to getting on a plane and going home. The spirit of Albion is really imbedded in everybody`s soul.”

Robert talked longingly of his farm: “That little farm is a lot of my life, and so are the two little seeds that run around it. So those are the saddening moments… but it really is the principle. If the government could lead a renovation, under reasonable terms I`d have no qualms about going back and saying okay, let`s make a deal. And I know everybody else feels the same. But it`s just this attitude of gotta get it all, gotta fill me pockets. Which is not where I`ve ever been at despite a few rather uneducated people commenting that that is all. So…I suppose when I do go home it`ll be Hallelujah and I shall kiss the soil again.”
The last time Led Zeppelin “performed” anywhere was in Jersey, at an impromptu gig egged on by Bonzo, and Plant says it was great.
“You see the possibility of playing and who can avoid it, you know? It was like rock and roll night at this dance hall that was like some place ten years gone by, in the best old English tradition.
“Guys with dickey bows and evening jackets ready to bang your head against a wall if you stepped out of line, and chairs and tables lined up in escalation. Chicks wearing suspenders and stockings and a lot of rock and roll.
“Bonzo said `C`mon man, let`s plan on going`. And I said, `look man, I can`t even walk for God`s sake, don`t embarass me. I can`t hobble across the dance floor and onto the stage.” He said we`d go through the side door and then up the back steps. And with amazing grace, that`s what I did and I found myself plunked on a stool. But I really was shy.

“Every time I went to hit a note, I stood up. Not putting any weight on my foot, but just sort of standing. Oh, there were some great photos.
“You know these guys in holiday areas with the cameras who come and take your photo and then you have to call midday the next day and show up at the pier where he will present you with whatever snaps he took the night before, and you find out how silly you looked or how drunk you in fact were for an extortionate price?
“I gave the guy a free hand to shoot like crazy, you know… shoot all these shots of Led Zeppelin in this antiquated ballroom, you know, backing this pianist. And we never even announced it. It was such an exciting experience, nobody even sat down. It was just rock and roll, but in the most basic sense of the word, it was great.
“Of course,” he continued, “I made sure that I sat almost behind Bonzo, wedged between the drums and the piano… but then I found myself edging forward just a little bit. Then, after the third number, I was wiggling the stool, past the drums and further out, you know. And it was like another flash of white light. It was great, really good. Except for we wouldn`t stop playing. They kept flashing the lights inside the place and really like, `Get them off the stage now, they`ve done enough`.
“I just talked to old Ralphsie – Mick from Bad Company – and they played the same gig.
“So this tiny weeny little dance hall is getting the pride of English musicianship for nothing. Just for the hell of playing, you know.”

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Talking about how Zep came to do their new album in a mere (count `em) 18 days, Robert recalled: “I moved to Sunset Strip because the trek to rehearsals from Malibu was a bit long. And I got bored with the Hyatt (Hotel) in a shorter amount of time than it normally takes, so I knew I must be getting better.
“Then I hopped on a plane and went to Germany. After getting used to it, the studio turned out to be okay, and as soon as we came to an understanding with the machinery and the equipment, we were off.
“I think we only went out twice; we were really too tired to do anything but put our heads down. It was like 14 hours a night, 18 days.
“Jimmy worked like a Trojan, no two ways about it. It`s his energy that got this album together so quick. I mean I was not really in any physical condition to hop around with gusto inspiring the situation greatly… although I was surprised the vocals were so good. The lyrics were coming thick and fast, presenting no problems at all.
“I had no second thoughts about the lyrics, they were all reflections on the time near and before the accident and that time afterwards, that contemplative thing, so I was very determined lyrically and vocally, but Jimmy put his energy into it. He worked so hard, and the guitar playing on this album surpasses anything I`ve heard for ages and ages. Brilliant, so much life in it. It`s like hallelujah and we`re back.
“There`s one song called “Achilles Last Stand” – you know, immortal but for the heel, or for being a heel, I don`t know which. No, I mustn`t joke about it, because I am very proud of it.

“There`s one song I wrote when I was very sad and missing Maureen in Malibu, and it`s very personal. You know times go very slowly when you get up every day and you can`t even kick a ball… run and kick a roadie… even kick your drummer. So time has been the teacher and I`ve been the pupil.
“Whew, that was heavy, did I really say that?”
`Fraid so, Robert.
“It`s hard to find the words to say it, but the whole experience of doing that album was very inspiring. It`s come from a different corner altogether of us, I think it`s come from that corner called survival.
“The only time that I wondered that it might not be there anymore was because of the physical. Only because there was a time when my soul was so covered by that cloud that I really didn`t know… what`s the point… but that only lasted a few seconds every day until it finally wore off. I mean I believe that we could start another album right now. Three weeks is amazing to record and mix and walk away.”
We change the subject – the Zeppelin movie. Does Plant have aspirations to the silver screen? The next Roger Daltrey?
“To be quite honest, I don`t think that I could… I mean for us, with that movie, it was basically the gig that was filmed…”
But what about the other stuff? You riding around on a horse and all?
“How dare you… me riding around on a horse… what do you think I`m doing, advertising men`s hairdressing or something like that?”
Sorry.

“Well… if I act onstage, I mean it`s not a sort of dance macabre, it`s not something premeditated. It`s just an extension of me, you know. But the whole process of being involved in any sort of serious filming bores me to tears. I mean just seeing those clips, adverts for films here makes me think. When we deliver something, we do it with as much as we`ve got. If we sink to the floor after that next note, or get dizzy reaching such a high pitch, or all the dogs start barking in Brooklyn… you know, only they can hear it folks… But you know what I mean, just to sort of waddle around with a script in front of a camera, I couldn`t possibly do. The interjections between the music on the film are just enough to give it the relish it requires.”
As for future plans, Plant said that he didn`t think Zeppelin would be doing anything on our shores for at least twelve months once he was able to go back home.
Really?
“Well, as much as I can be on the road ad infinitum, I really can`t be without Maureen and the kids and the farm and that whole thing back there which I love. I`ve really got to go back. I`m not at the sort of desperation point, but it`s only fair to tour when you`ve had a lot of that which inspires you to lift yourself above… You`ve got to go home to get a little bit of fire in you to go back again. It`s like going back to your corner.”
How long?
“Well, who knows, you know. I mean I`d been away a year when I went home. I was so pleasantly thrilled and intoxicated by the atmosphere and everything. It must be the same for everybody, it must be the same for Mick, for Elton. You can only come out of your corner giving something wholesome and brilliant or good or whatever if you`ve been back in your corner to sort of shuffle around and sort of fire yourself up again.”
Twelve months?
“Well, you can look at it two ways. You can say that, but then you can say is twelve months long enough to be at home after everything I`ve been through? I could do with just sitting down with my family and just thanking the gods that I`ve got one, that I`m part of one. That doesn`t mean that I`ve lost the grease at the bottom of my shoes, it means that I`ve got to go back to my corner for a little while.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of New Musical Express also contains articles/interviews with these people: Queen, Tony Iommi, The Fania All-Stars, David Bowie, Sailor, Gay and Terry Woods.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 15 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Led Zeppelin FROM NEW MUSICAL EXPRESS, March 1, 1975

It is nice to re-print some album reviews featuring what is now considered classic albums. Here is one more…enjoy!

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Kiss your skull goodbye…

Led Zeppelin: “Physical Graffiti” (Swan Song)

Review by Steve Clarke

If you take Led Zeppelin`s fourth album to be the definitive Zep album in the same way that “Sticky Fingers” is the definitive Stones` album – and I know that`s a contentious point – then “Physical Graffiti”, in the same way can be seen as Zeppelin`s “Exile On Main Street”, (and I don`t just mean that they`re both double albums).
Both the fourth Zeppelin album and “Sticky Fingers” saw each band hitting highs it seems unlikely they`ll ever be able to transcend.
Isn`t “Wild Horses” the ultimate Stones` ballad, doesn`t “Stairway To Heaven” represent Zeppelin at their most creative in terms of composition and musicianship? And can you see them topping the outrageous riffola of “Black Dog”, or the Stones writing a rocker that out-does “Brown Sugar”?
But “Exile On Main Street” over-flowed with peerless rock `n` roll, while just missing out on the polish that “Sticky Fingers” had. Likewise, with “Physical Graffiti” and “Led Zeppelin 4”; the former does not quite attain the perfection which the best of the earlier album does.

Coming some two years after the fifth (best forgotten) Zeppelin album, “Houses Of The Holy”, “Physical Graffiti” is confirmation that the group have lost none of their inspiration and ability, even if it did take them a long time to deliver.
The first of the two albums never lets up in its brute force right from Jimmy Page`s opening power-chorded riff of “Custard Pie”, the riff itself reminiscent of Page`s work on The Kinks early records, to Side two`s closing “Kashmir”, where the group assume the posture of a giant earnestly stepping on everything in his wake, John Bonham`s drums being truly gargantuan.
It`s not the kind of music you play before breakfast unless you wake up in a particularly aggressive mood.
“Custard Pie” has all the manic Zeppelin energy you`d expect. Page`s riff never lets up throughout the track`s four minutes twenty seconds, a clavinet complementing the riff. On top is added wah-wah, Robert Plant`s mouth-harp, and a guitar solo that unfolds itself from one speaker before enveloping the whole show.
The side`s closing 11-minute plus “In My Time Of Dying” is a dazzling display of the Led Zeppelin rock machine in full flight.

Page`s arrangement of the blues song is spacier than those of the two preceeding cuts, and his playing almost confuses the listener as to whether he`s laying down power chords, or lightning fast slide phrases.
Going through a lot of rhythm changes, the cut showcases Bonham`s bombastic drumming, and Plant`s multi-tracked vocal has been treated so that it`s as if he was singing across a canyon.
Side two continues the skull-crushing with “Houses Of The Holy”, which features a lethal bass sound, and “Trampled Underfoot” where the nagging riff gets too much to handle.
The nine minutes plus “Kashmir” brings the side to a close. The number is built around a phrase played on what is presumably a mellotron that seems to set out to mesmerise the listener.
If the first album hammers your brain into your skull, then the second record`ll let you think again. It`s by far the most imaginative of the two albums, and with numbers like “Down By The Seaside” and “Night Flight” features new facets of Zeppelin.

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“Down By The Seaside”, despite its trite lyricism is a fascinating song in an uncharacteristically relaxed mood, even Bonham`s approach being lighter than usual.
Page plays a lot of Leslie-guitar fills, and just when you think the band are going to head off into one of their hell for leather breaks they slip back into the original rhythm with remarkable ease.
The preceding “Bron Yr Aur” is Page`s acoustic, finger-picking number and is likeable enough with a production that allows the guitars to fan from one speaker to the other.
Side three`s opener, “In The Light” is a Zeppelin tour de force however.
Starting out with a sustained moog phrase that sounds like a bag-pipe drone, another lighter and more melodic series of phrases are played on top, again by a moog, Plant`s vocals zoom in before a cast-iron riff appears, introduced by Page Power chords, and then the whole thing develops into prettiness with another keyboard phrase completed by one of Page`s more melodic runs.

And so onto the closing side which opens with an uncompromising rocker “Meet Me In The Morning” expertly sung by Plant with just the right amount of energy, continues with Zeppelin as the archetypal rock riff kings for “The Wanton Song”, before going into what could have been a throwaway jam, “Boogie With Stu” (Ian Stewart`s on piano), but which ends up as enormous fun, the group exposing their blues roots for “Black Country Woman”, a work-out for acoustic guitars, vocals and Bonham`s ludicrous drums where he gets away with some time-defying tricks, before closing with “Sick Again” which again sees the band as a giant rock machine putting down an incessant riff like only they know how.
There you have it, the new album by the band which you, the readers, voted the best in the world. And if that`s what you think, there`s nothing on this album that`s about to change your mind.
Hard rock lives, and how.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper and you are free to use it as you like. If you use it on your own webpages – please credit me or put up a link to my blog.

This number of New Musical Express also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull), Elton John, NME`s Soul Spectacular, Adrian Gurvitz, Budgie, Leo Sayer, Queen.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail, if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be around or upwards of 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Led Zeppelin FROM NEW MUSICAL EXPRESS, February 15, 1975

This is my sixth article with this band, but they were really big in the seventies so I guess there will be even more. What more is there to say? Enjoy!

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A skirmish not for squeamish on Starship One…

In which the in-flight entertainment stars Led Zeppelin versus the man from the press

By Lisa Robinson

The limousines are lined up for action outside the Plaza Hotel. So, too, are the girls, notebooks and felt-tips clutched in teenage hands, breaking out into a crescendo of squeals and giggles as Mssrs Page, Plant, Bonham and Jones attempt their getaway.
Cute?
Zepmania at the Plaza! I love it.
And, of course, there`s the odd policeman or construction worker who slips a grubby little piece of paper through the half -opened limo window…
“For my daughter…she`d kill me if I didn`t get this.” Can you believe that they still use that line?

We`re driving out to Newark where the Starship is parked. John Paul Jones is attempting to reassure me about my flying fears. Jones, by the way, no longer seems so introverted and “reticent”; in addition to beating anyone he can get to play backgammon and/or chess with him on the plane, he`s been mumbling with anticipation about an excursion down to Christopher Street to an establishment called “The Pleasure Chest” which is, for those of you not familiar with New York City landmarks, a lovely little store with a good supply of leather and bondage items. Hmmmm.
He`s promised that we can take photos of said excursion as well. (Come to think of it, one of those little girls outside of the Plaza had a “David Bowie” patch embroidered onto the back of her jeans. I mentioned this; Jones replied; “She`d better not turn around, or she`ll get kicked.” What is this?)
We chat a bit about rock`n`roll touring. “It seems as though the whole business is getting older,” he observes. “It used to be that everyone was sort of around 20…now everyone seems to be veering around 30. Wonder what the energy level will be like in 20 years from now…It`s amazing really, because when I think about it, I`m doing exactly what my father used to do.
“He was a musician, played in a lot of big bands, travelled on the road…strange hotel rooms all the time.”

Bonzo is freezing in the back of the limo. “And I`m wearing a coat made for the Antartic,” he mutters. “Turn up the heat,” Plant complies, and the car quickly becomes a sauna.
Bonzo is still freezing, Robert falls asleep, wakes up and tries to sneak the heat off. “Turn the heat on,” shouts Bonzo, “turn the radio on!” James & Bobby Purify`s “I Wanna Testify” blasts forth. “What`s this?” asks Plant.
We`re stuck in traffic in the Lincoln (or is it the Holland) Tunnel (on the way to Detroit) and no one is smiling.
The starship is the same as last tour; big, maroon/gold mirrors, fur covered bedspreads, TV and videotape machines. It makes the flying easier, but it still gets boring. Jimmy Page and Peter Grant sit in the small sitting room for much of the flight. Jonesy has not been playing the piano bar, he`s been busy with games, and Bonzo usually sits in the front, trying to rest.
The trip to Detroit was particular interesting because on board was a writer from a British national daily. He`s trying to interview Jimmy on the plane and all of a sudden I hear what sounds like dissent.

The conversation goes something like this. Page: “You don`t want to know about my music, or my concerts. You`ll go back and write about how much money we gross and the interior of the plane and that`s it….”
“You`re not supposed to make intelligent remarks,” says the Man From The Press.
“You know,” says Jimmy, patiently, “I don`t just jump up and down onstage…I worked in studio sessions for years…I compose music…”
It`s no use. The antagonism has been established, and will be continued.
As the cars pull into the Detroit Olympia Stadium, thousands of kids are lined up by the stage door.
In the dressing room Jimmy is still fuming: “Can you imagine, that man referred to my guitar playing as a trade?” he asks incredulously. “I didn`t go to vocational school.”
The worst is yet to come.
During Bonzo`s drum solo, when the band retire for a moment`s rest into the dressing room, the Man From The Press attempts to follow.

Richard Cole refuses him entry. “Who are you?”, demands The Man From The Press. “I`m the tour manager,” Cole answers, with the kind of expression his face that If You Knew Richard Like I Know Richard you would know to get going, fast.
“Hotel manager?” Uh-oh.
“No, I`m the bloody tour manager, and the band is having a meeting…I`m sorry, you cannot go inside.”
“I write for ten million people and I won`t have you belittle me in front of a member of my staff….” and so on and so forth.
At this point, I`m not sure who said “you`ll never walk again”, but Cole was decidedly not amused.
Back on the plane, people are mumbling and discussing the situation in small groups of twos and threes. The arrogance of this Pressman is astounding, his femme companion looks nervous, his photographer looks downright terrified.
All of a sudden Jimmy, who`s been resting under a red blanket, comes to life and tries to have a discussion with the reporter. And it becomes apparent that they are discussing…oh no…politics.
“He`s a communist,” Jimmy turns and says with confusion. What?
Robert`s mumbling: “Ten million people read the paper…I don`t think he`s such a bad bloke….Me mum and dad read that paper…it`s a good paper, really….”

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Richard Cole is still fuming. Bonzo is shouting, “Will you all shut up, I want some rest!” The remainder of this episode is confusing. A drink is spilled, Robert is trying to be charming, and Jimmy is discussing the way he voted in the last election.
Robert sez to me: “Why don`t you just say `Jimmy Page wrestled with a cub (make sure you say cub) reporter on the subject of British imperialism in India in the 19th Century?”
This went on all the way back to the hotel in the limo, until Jimmy and The Man From The Press eventually shook hands and said no hard feelings.
Anyway, it made for an interesting plane ride.
In between such minor skirmishes (for this one, although it could have become hairy, never really materialized into fisticuffs), time was spent watching videotapes of “Flash Gordon” and “Don`t Knock The Rock”.
In Detroit Plant is really strutting and camping it up onstage. “He`s going to be ready for Las Vegas soon,” comments Peter Grant. “I keep telling him, `Percy, I`ve got Las Vegas lined up for you!`”
An amazing girl with rather large breasts is in the front row; wearing a sequinned one-shoulder top. She keeps shaking her tits at Jimmy…he starts shaking his back at her. A crazed boy is shaking a pint of gin at the stage; the security guards watch closely. Jimmy takes huge slugs out of a Jack Daniels bottle, thus endearing himself to writer Lester Bangs forever.

New York, Madison Square Garden, Maybe it`s `cos it`s my town, but it always seems somehow that this is really the Big One.
The security at the Garden is amazing, and the stage is set up very tight. No room for any hangers on. Robert is looking for the honey for his tea in the dressing room. He`s still having a hard time of it from his cough. Jimmy and I talk about “Lucifer Rising” – the Kenneth Anger film he`s scored. He`s got a print of it in his room and has been blasting it at unbelievable volume.
“I`m sure I`m going to get tossed out of the hotel,” he smiled. It`s a hypnotic, slightly ominous little bit of cinema. I loved it, and Page seems pleased with the way it`s turned out as well.
We hear that the Atlantic Records execs are in the audience; they`re hosting a party later in the Garden`s Penn Plaza Club. People Magazine had that day come out with an article that claimed Led Zeppelin were “bigger than the Beatles”. (I was told that week that John Lennon had heard “Stairway To Heaven” and loved it. “He`s only just heard it?” was Plant`s typical comment.)
“Dazed And Confused” was added to the show for the first time on the tour. Obviously Jimmy`s finger was up to it, after paining him severely on earlier gigs. The lighting during the guitar, violin bow solo was spectacular; all smokey greens and purples, surrounding Page in a very demonic triangle. The green lasers worked well…beaming way out over the heads of the audience.

“This was the best show so far,” says Robert in the dressing room.
And, of course, no Zeppelin show would be complete without the old Cole speedy getaway bit in the limos. Richard`s got them all lined up by the backstage ramp, ready to race out after the second encore (“Communication Breakdown”) back to the hotel for a bit of the old “tarting up” before the party.
Keith Moon`s in Jimmy`s suite, splendid in a striped vested suit, tie and hat.
At the Penn Plaza Club, Andy Warhol sits in a corner with his entourage. Steve Paul is at a round table with his entourage, and we hear that Diane Keaton and William Burroughs had been there earlier.
Jimmy Page was quickly joined by an enthusiastic Amanda Lear (“I`m in love,” she trilled to me the very next day).

After the Montreal gig, Zeppelin were due to have attended a party back in New York for the Jackson Five; but we returned too late…way past the J-5`s bedtime.
It wasn`t past David Bowie`s bedtime though, for he sat with Ava Cherry in Robert Plant`s hotel suite listening to an Alphonse Mouzon elpee. David looked thinner than ever but ravissant (actually, he looks like Lillian Gish) in a green fur midi coat, orange hair, translucent skin, and a felt hat, and he chatted a bit with John Paul Jones, who laughed and said he`s known him forever.
Peter Grant said there were more people in Zep`s entourage than the business J. Tull was doing in L.A. (this, in response to challenges by the Tull people as to their boys doing more business).
As I left, I asked Bonzo if he did anything special with his drums during his solo; putting them through a phaser or such…”It`s all magic,” he replied, “don`t you see me playing with little black wands?”

Did not find their single on YouTube. Love their album title!

Did not find their single on YouTube. Love their album title!

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper and you are free to use it as you like. If you use it on your own webpages – please credit me or put up a link to my blog.

This number of New Musical Express also contains articles/interviews with these people: Paul Kossoff (Free), Pete Kleinow, Caravan, Montrose, Peter Hammill, Blue Öyster Cult, Alice Cooper, Lenny Bruce, Eric Clapton, Jerry Leiber & Mike Stoller, Millie Jackson, Richard Digance, Bev Bevan (ELO), Gene Vincent, Charley Pride.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail, if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be around or upwards of 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Led Zeppelin FROM NEW MUSICAL EXPRESS, February 1, 1975

This article was published just weeks before the release of “Physical Graffiti”, their sixth studio album and the one with “Kashmir” on it. And you better not tell me that you haven`t heard that song… This album is among a lot of music critics regarded as one of the very best in the history of rock. Here is a report from the start of their tour in the USA, where they later sold eight million copies of the aforementioned double-album, awarding it 16x platinum in 2006.
Enjoy this report from the frontlines.

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“Karen Carpenter couldn`t last ten minutes with a Zeppelin number.”

Does this statement look interesting to you? It DOES? Then you must be a LED ZEPPELIN fan. Hi there! And welcome to our centre spread. Your tour-guide this week is LISA ROBINSON and sandwiches will be provided at half-price.

Last time I was in Chicago was in 1969 when I stayed with The Stooges at the Skid Row Holiday Inn.
Chicago. They say they do things they don`t do on Broadway, but I doubt it.
Led Zeppelin are holed up in the fadingly elegant Ambassador East Hotel (“fadingly elegant” means that the telephones don`t work) where the main attractions are the chi-chi Pump Room and the Buttery Disco.
The hotel brochure describes the Buttery as “The (new) Buttery, dramatic NOW (sic) discotheque, for the smart young set, is an after dark magnet. Compelling music for dancing and listening seven nights a week lures the chic and the celebrated. That blazing aggregation, “The J. B. Polks” headlines the show Tuesday through Sat. from 9 until ?”.
John Bonham put on a suit to go and check the place out one night and returned five minutes later. “So much for that,” he said.

The hotel is boring and pretty calm, but Zep`s presence is felt. Although the celebrated Mr. Onoko (the man who hid in the jungle for 30 years) is staying here, the guards discreetly lurking here and there are for the band. Just in case.
It`s pretty early in the day, but Robert struts and preens around his expansive suite, happy and ever-willing to pose for photos.
“Don`t count them all as my taste,” he warns, as I rifle through the LPs scattered on his coffee table. Margie Joseph, Aretha Franklin, Danny O`Keefe, Otis Redding, The Guess Who.
“Except for Danny O`Keefe and The Guess Who. The Guess Who are great.” He twinkles. “Really. They`re my favourite group right now. I mean, that guy who used to be the singer – we-e-ell, I just thought he was doing Robert Plant imitations. But the one now is terrific.
“What happened to the other guy? Randy who? BTO? Oh yeah? Are they a big group here?
“Excuse me,” he grins, fondling his crotch just a bit.
Ohmigod! Ahem. The tour, Robert.

“I`ll tell you. At that Chislehurst Caves function I realised I really missed the unity of the four of us. I realised that above everything else, above record companies, above films, we were Led Zeppelin – above everything.
“From that moment on we started rehearsing, and getting into full gear. Some of the new tracks already sound better than they do on the album. They`re really building.
“So once again we recorded at just the right time – because everybody felt the same way. We worked really hard, we worked ourselves almost into the ground. I mean, despite the fact that we don`t see each other every day and that Bonzo lives right down the road and half the time he`s at Hereford Market selling bulls, it still seems that at the right time we got together and we write something that keeps us all satisfied – musically.
“I love the album. There are some real humdinger, roaring tracks on it – and then there are some others that are going to take a while…and then people will see.”

Last time we spoke you mentioned something about this disc being a bit more, um, groinal.
“Well,” he smiles, “some of the lyrics are a bit more `groinal`, if we can start using that phrase.”
I like it.
“It is nice, isn`t it? Wonder what it means?
“I know what Nick Kent said about the stuff we can `do in our sleep.` And I can transpose that from his rather campish pen – obviously half the time he uses invisible ink – but that track “Wanton Song”…he`s right. This is what Zeppelin has been all about, which is so groinal…
“We`re really playing well now, we`re quite mature, you know. We can play stuff like `Black Dog` – which is the Zeppelin that comes out of our ears – but we can also alter the mood with things like `Kashmir` or `The Song Remains The Same` or `No Quarter` where the mood changes so beautifully.
“In a big auditorium that`s so fabulous – to take the mood and change the whole thing.”

“I was really nervous before the first gig,” Plant confesses, suddenly. “We`re always so nervous. I dunno why – I think it`s because we`re so self-critical.
“As we walked up to the stage that night Jimmy turned to me and said `This is really deja vu, you know?`, we have been here before…as the heart went into the mouth.
“And of course, if Jimmy gets sick or anything goes wrong with him it affects me too.”
What are you looking forward to most on this tour?
“Oh dear. Well. I`ve already had the biggest turn-on I could imagine, and that was going to watch Buddy Guy and Hound Dog Taylor last night. I mean, really – the blues isn`t dead. Al Green is great, but underneath all the shim-shim, there`s a town called Chicago…and Buddy Guy is still fantastic.
“You know you`re getting to where the music is when the FBI guy in the front seat locks his car door…You can just sit there and literally shiver listening to that man, and he`s playing a cafe and his amplifier is on top of a pinball machine.”
And the old road fever?
“You`re talking to The New Robert Plant. My perspective has changed on a lot of things. I`ve been through so many tours that now I see that there are ways and means of making it more enjoyable without having to rush into anything or burning yourself out. If there`s any raping or looting about…well, it`s done with good taste, I suppose…
“We still manage to entertain ourselves like a right young bunch of executives.”

“I`d like to have it publicised that I came in after Karen Carpenter in the Playboy drummer poll,” roars John Bonham as I enter the dressing room before the first show.
“She couldn`t last ten minutes with a Zeppelin number,” he sneers.
Bonzo`s leaning back against the couch wearing a splendid suede patchworked winter coat – bought new in Chicago out of necessity. Only John Paul Jones came prepared for the weather, bringing along a maroon fur the same colour as was his wife`s hair last tour.
Jones is still fairly reticent – but he smiles more now, so I go up to him in the bathroom where he`s combing his carefully tailored hair (long, spikey sideburns and ducktailed in the back) and ask him why he doesn`t do interviews.
“Awh…they want to interview the stars, not the rhythm section.”
Can I quote that?
“No! My first quote in six years? It isn`t going to be that.”
Puleez.
“Did it sound snide?”
No, it`s funny.
“Oh,” he says, disappointed. “It was supposed to sound snide.”
Of course, personal manager Richard Cole is there. Backstage, as everywhere, he sees everything.

Although he speaks with a bit of longing about getting on to New York and the Oyster Bar (“Oh, they`ll see me coming. Here`s old golden pen again…”), right now he`s keeping careful watch on the backstage area of the Chicago Stadium. Someone dreadful approaches. “Do you remember me from 1973?” the boy asks. “I was very close with John Paul…”
Richard`s eyes roll towards the heavens. He doesn`t want to know.
Rapidly, he hands the kid two tickets – the most polite way of telling anyone to piss off I`ve ever witnessed.
Three girls race in, chilled by the freezing cold.
“RICHARD, RICHARD!!” they squeal. “Thank GOD you`re here!”
And – with remarkable finesse, Cole smiles, hands them three tickets, and sends them on their way – all in the time it`s taken him to mutter “Oh, Christ” under his breath.
Zeppelin just couldn`t do a tour without him. It`s that simple.

The group goes onstage to the roar of 20,000 kids. “Rock And Roll” bursts forth, followed by the new “Sick Again”.
By the time the band have got into “Over The Hills And Far away,” it seems that something`s wrong.
“We`ve got a couple of predicaments,” Plant apologises. “First, my inability to come to terms with the climate – and second, our guitarist broke his finger.” (More on that later.)
“When The Levee Breaks”, “The Song Remains The Same,” and “Rain Song” take us to the new and obviously powerful “Kashmir”. By the time they`ve done “In My Time Of Dying” and “Stairway”, the kids are responding hysterically enough to demand two encores: “Black Dog” and “Communication Breakdown”.
Here, the tour de force of the elaborate and impressive lighting system comes in to play. The band`s return is to the accompaniment of the legend “LED ZEPPELIN” lit up in four foot high letters at the rear of the stage.
As they come offstage, they`re wrapped in red terry-cloth robes for the limo ride back to the hotel.
“Now they`re called Red Zeppelin,” cracks Danny Goldberg, but the mood is pretty low.

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The second night is something else altogether. As the lights dim, the crowd start to cheer and backstage Robert smiles and says: “They`re playing my song.”
Fifteen seconds onstage and everyone knows it`s going to be hot. Perhaps the first night letdown`s done some good in that they`ve had to really try harder – it`s amazing how much they care. After all, they`re making the same amount of money. They`ve sold out everywhere.
But they`ve been truly depressed and confused all day about the first Chicago show.
No matter; tonight they`re playing with that old black Zeppelin magic again, and the audience go wild. “Trampled Underfoot” is magnificent. With a “Come Together”-like rhythm and real rocking guitar, it sounds as if the Beatles battled the Stones in a parking lot – and Led Zeppelin won.
A roll of toilet paper is thrown onstage and Peter Grant mumbles “Uh-oh. That doesn`t mean Bonzo shit himself, does it?” Bonzo, meanwhile, is dressed in a white boilersuit and black bowler hat. His roadie, Mick Hinton, is dressed identically (“It`s a double act,” says Cole); in addition, however, Hinton has one very carefully painted Clockwork Orange eye…
“We`d like to dedicate this next song to all the people who came to see us without our having a record out,” Plant announces as the strains of “Stairway” begin.
Cheers, roars, hoo-ha. There`s no doubt that this is the American Zeppelin favourite.
“Of course,” he adds, “it`s not that we haven`t been busy. We`ve just been starting a record company, and making a film, and jerking ourselves off…”

At noon the following day Jimmy Page comes to my room for breakfast. (Eek! – Ed.).
He`s in a really good mood because he got five hours sleep (a lot, for him) and he knows last night`s show was great.
He describes his broken finger.
“I`m having to develop a three-finger style,” he laughs. “But it`s a drag. It happened when I was on a train in England – on my way to rehearsal. I was at the front of the train planning to rush off and grab a taxi, when the train stopped abruptly. I must have grabbed at something, and the finger got caught in the hinge of the door.
“I was just totally numb – numb with shock. I just looked at it and said…`Oh, no`…I mean it`s the most important finger for a guitarist: third finger, left hand. The wedding ring finger…
“It`s the one that does all the leverage, and most of the work, and it really came as a blow because I just couldn`t play with it, I`m still not really playing with it. Last night I used it on a couple of chord changes, but it still hurts.
“I`m starting to master a three-fingered technique, though. I may start to work at this at home – work out three and two -finger techniques so that whenever there`s another accident – which I`m bound to have, at the beginning of an important tour! – I`ll be ready for it.”

He orders scrambled eggs with ketchup, English muffins, and tea – which, although he`s been mixing a lot of vitamin enriched banana daiquaris in his room, is the most he eats in a day on the road. “I`m off eating, I`m trying to photosynthesize – like a plant,” he laughs.
Page, perhaps more than the others, suffers from the rigours of the road.
“But this time I`m going to get some Afghani hangings and my rooms are going to look like – well, like mosques. You get loads of carpets and lay them on top of each other and have everything candlelit.
“My home`s like that, you see, and I`d like to bring my home on tour. But I can`t – so I have to try this.
“The situation with the house now is that when people come to the door, if they`ve got anything worthwhile saying, they`re allowed in.
“If they`re idiots, or cranks or fanatics, they`re welcome to walk around the grounds.
“You`d be surprised though. Some people really have a lot to say.
“The reason I got the bookshop together was because there was not one bookshop in London with a good collection of occult books and I was so pissed off at not being able to get the books I wanted.
“And, whereas I can`t ever see that shop making money, there`ll be a bit of publishing there – astrology books and things like that.”

Discussing the Zeppelin film, Page describes his solo sequence.
“Mine`s a fantasy sequence of The Hermit – The Hermit tarot card that`s on the fourth LP. Lots of laboratory work – ageing faces and things like that.
“I was exhausted at the end of it because I had to stand up all the time…absolutely rigid, my eyes unblinking, totally constant. I really had to bring out all my yoga training for that.
“The hardest bit was when I had to hold the lantern out.
“Anyway, it`s an interpretation of The Hermit card and, when people see it, they`ll understand what it`s all about. It all ties in with the violin part of `Dazed And Confused`.
“The movie`s a musical. It starts in England, shows the total tranquility of England with just natural sounds, and then goes to the last U.S. tour. The way that it changes is really amazing, the whole pace of the tour really comes in.
“I imagine it`ll come out by the summer. We haven`t got much to finish – just mixing the soundtrack.
“I feel that there`s so much to do in such a short time, you know. I`ve had that feeling closing in on me for the last few years.
“I realize that I`ve been playing for ten years – I don`t know if people realize that. I think some of them think I`m just starting!
“I`ve enjoyed it, though. I`d like to play for another twenty years. But I don`t know, I just can`t see it happening. I don`t know why. I can`t explain it in words.
“It`s just a funny feeling…A foreboding…Vultures.”

Peter Grant sits on a brocaded couch in the living room of his ornate suite. (“It`s the only suite that Zsa Zsa Gabor will stay in when she comes to Chicago.”)
Peter`s willing to talk to me about a possible British date for Zeppelin, but he`s conservative about it.
“There is something planned, but it`s not finalized. It`s not an outdoor festival. I can tell you that. It is a big place, in London – and will be over several nights.
“If everything goes fine it will be in May. I`m not being secretive, it`s just that it`s not finalized yet.”
“We really don`t get much flak about Zeppelin neglecting Britain in favour of the States,” Grant continues thoughtfully. “Because we haven`t been here so long. In the beginning there was some of that – but you have to realize that when the band started (and I know it was the same for the Beck band and Ten Years After as well) the British promoters weren`t really interested. They`d rather put on a reggae disco.
“So you had to come over here to get to people. When Zeppelin came to the States and started doing really well, it suddenly dawned on them that something good was happening.

“But we will do three or four days in London. An indoor site.
“We`ve wanted to play a really good gig in England for some years,” Page interjects. “The problem has always been the site. Like with that Knebworth Park thing – it was never finalized, and they put us in a situation where they tried to force us to do it, and that was unforgivable.
“So the kids felt that we`d let them down, and I suppose in a way we did let them down – but we didn`t mean to.
“I`m on in Wolverhampton every Saturday afternoon,” Plant laughs.
Sorry, what?
“I go to see Wolverhampton Wanderers every Saturday afternoon. The public is always aware of my presence and my voice is always exercised to its fullest as I cheer on one of the finest football teams the country has ever known.”
It`s not the same as doing a concert though.
“What?” he shrieks. “They brought international football to England in the 1950`s – they are a superb team. You should hear some of the notes I reach…”

After the third show, everyone feels like going out.
Assembling in the truly dreary Buttery (a bar-mitzvah band is playing “Can`t Get Enough”), everyone makes for the Bistro, Strobe lights, B.T. Express, Labelle`s “Lady Marmalade”, “one monkey don`t stop no show” and all.
Robert dances, Jimmy (who seems to be wearing some kind of charcoal eye makeup) is sitting in a booth with Gee, Cole. Clive Coulson (who`s come over for Bad Company tour negotiations). Lots of Dom Perignon, and some girl tries to show Clive how to do The Bump.
“See, don`t I take you to the best places?” laughs Richard Cole.
Bonzo`s sitting in a booth at the Bistro, not feeling too well. He`s been having stomach problems and thinks it`s nerves. Sitting there, quietly talking about his wife (“We met when I was 16, got married when I was 17…I was a carpenter and got up at 7 a.m. and then had to change for a gig that night in the van…I think that has a lot to do with why I`m the way I am”), he does seem amazingly – as he put it – “softhearted”.
“I don`t know,” he mumbled later, getting into the elevator at a sleepy 3 a.m. “I just don`t feel much like raving about these days…”
Zeppelin mellowing? Well, Robert was surveying the Bistro`s local talent without much enthusiasm.
(To be sure, most of the local talent was maintaining a slim hold on masculinity, but still…)

What can you say about a six-year-old band that has America in the palm of its hand?
It`s just begun, really – and yet Zeppelin has already managed to make every other rock news/concert/whatever pale by comparison.
And meanwhile the plane – the super Starship, all red, white and blue with white stars and the words LED ZEPPELIN painted on the side – waits patiently at Chicago`s O`Hare Airport to bring the lads to New York City and the rest of the country.
The tour is underway.

For some reason, NME used to print pix of naked ladies along with the Gig Guide.

For some reason, NME used to print pix of naked ladies along with the Gig Guide.

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper and you are free to use it as you like. If you use it on your own webpages – please credit me or put up a link to my blog.

This number of New Musical Express also contains articles/interviews with these people: Lowell George (Little Feat), Alan Hull (Lindisfarne), Kiss, Doobie Brothers, Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull), Bruce Springsteen, Marc Bolan, John McLaughlin, The Soft Machine, Bob Pegg, Little Milton, Ian Bairnson (Pilot).

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail, if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be around or upwards of 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Led Zeppelin FROM NEW MUSICAL EXPRESS, December 7, 1974

This interview with Jimmy Page was conducted some three months before the release of “Physical Graffiti”, a double album that went to No. 1 on the charts in the UK, USA and Canada. Led Zeppelin didn`t release any studio albums in 1974, so this release was heavily anticipated by their extremely large fan-base all over the world. And they were not disappointed – the famous song “Kashmir” was by itself worth the money anyone paid for this album.

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The Graffiti of the Physical…
…and the Exploration of the Metaphysical.

A candid interview with Led Zep.
Words: Nick Kent Pics: Pennie Smith

The barley has been harvested. The heifers too have been put out to pasture, the Scalectrix sets have been pieced together and stored away for the time being…
Led Zeppelin are once again fully operative, girding their collective loins for another gargantuan American tour and celebrating a reunion after what has indisputably been their longest period of musical inactivity with a amiably sturdy set of rehearsals which started last week.
The rehearsals themselves will carry them pretty much up to the beginning of January when the group fly to Europe to showcase the new act to Dutch and Belgian audiences before letting themselves be swept away once again in a magic flurry of the Jet Lag-intended brand of “Road Fever” (the formal Zeppelin term) that constitutes the American Tour.

November 26 – a Tuesday as it happens – marked the formal return to arms, so to speak, down at Liveware, a converted theatre in an anonymous hinterland of equally anonymous Ealing. The band arrived at approximately 3.0 p.m., re-acquainted themselves with a cut-down P.A. system and in a subsequent seven-hour period commenced manfully sifting through a hefty volume of songs marked off as the new material to appear on the next Swansong Atlantic release – the first of the New Year. This is to be a double Zeppelin set titled (for no apparent reason except that it sounds good and does tie in with the consequent sleeve design – “a mechanical construction” also described by Jimmy Page with characteristic sly grin as a “peeping tom`s delight”), “Physical Graffiti”.
By 6.0 p.m. one number, “Tramped Underfoot” has been both mustered and mastered to be followed by a sprightly reacquaintance with “In My Time Of Dying”, the old gospel traditional Bob Dylan performed with such youthful fervour on his very first album.

Only this time Messrs Page and Plant have turned the harrowing old chestnut into an even more invigorating workout for electric bottle-neck, banshee vocalese and sudden dapper swerves in the 12-bar framework courtesy of a single off-the wall chord occasionally tossed into the affair like a musical handgrenade – or a sudden Bonham thrash that sets the hairs on the back of the neck a-quivering.
This after all is Led Zeppelin, the true Princes of the Heavy Metal Zone, back after what appears to have been an extrasomnabulant sojourn; while it seems the likes of such callow pretenders as Queen, teethed on self-same power chords and pulp athletics, have been edging in on the action with such success that it must have put the wind up their spiritual forefathers.
Still, the spirit is strong enough on this first rehearsal to motivate the band into a spontaneous version of “When The Levee Breaks”, the track that blitzed off the fourth album and a number the band have never actually performed outside a studio. Until now that is. Jimmy Page is thinking very seriously of renovating it for the new tour as, after all, with its bottleneck mainvein it fits like a dove-tail joint directly against the grain of “Dying”.

Subsequent valiant stabs are made at two more new numbers – “Sick Again”, which even in its skeletal form shows distinct signs of bristling out as a Zep masterwork, while there is always “Custard Pies”, a prime Zep knock-about which displays a conscious bent towards Page`s Eel Pie Island beginning.
Finally, at 9.0 p.m., regular as clockwork, Robert dusts out his best Presley grunt and the band obligingly fall into place for “Don`t Be Cruel” encoring with “Hound Dog”. Plant, right in the spirit by this time, is pushing for a third time around – “You daw-w-n`t- / ahk…uh cray-zz-uh-music. You don`t…uh…”
“Persistent isn`t he,” mutters Bonham, now more than ever resembling an amiable barrel draped in a donkey-jacket, who`s not having any of it.
So Plant makes do behind the drum-kit, banging out rimshots and the cow-bell introduction to “Honky Tonk Women”, moving his arms like a man throwing darts in a pub.
John Paul Jones counters by doing his party-piece Ramsey Lewis impersonation, ear-to-ear grin like one of those mechanical puppet organists you pay 5p to see perform sea-side medleys via a slot-machine in a sea-front amusement arcade.
The rigours of the day now make him resemble a third-year law student holding down a holiday job sorting the Christmas mail.

Only Plant and Page appear to preserve that necessary look of pop-star…”ambiance”, the former unchanged down to the last wisp of the luxurious lion`s mane of blond hair, while the latter`s guitar hero veneer is omnipresent as ever.
Page, in fact, always tends to look quite diminutive in size whenever he moves onstage – much smaller in fact than he really is, though this must have something to do with Plant`s stockier “boyo” physique paralleling his own; and then there`s always the low-slung Gibson guitar, hung almost as low as Steve Marriot`s knee-length drapery back in the Small Faces days.
Yes, so anyway there we all were in this Ealing rehearsal studio, like, and well, mind you, it has been quite a time since the name “Zeppelin” has resounded imperiously throughout the Media.
The occasional interview, that reception at the Chislehurst Caves, but otherwise it`s been pretty much relegated to the backwaters of Rolling Stone “Random Notes” and the tattle columns of those other…uh, music periodicals. And even then it`s been pretty much lean pickings.
Of course there`s always the odd morsel or so like those two that appeared recently.

I mean, Jimmy, did you see that one about Keith Richard located out in Switzerland adding organ and backing vocals to the track “Scarlet” that you, Ric Grech and Keith himself recorded down at Island`s Basing Street studios a couple of months ago, and which was supposed to be the B-side to a cut-down “Ain`t Too Proud to Beg” and here Keith was muttering something about it being donated to “a Jimmy Page album.”
“Oh dear (laughs). I think that must have been Keith putting someone on actually. I`ve certainly no plans whatsoever to record a solo album or anything like that.”
Page and Richard are old acquaintances from way back, by the way, starting when Page was brought in to help out on the first Rolling Stones album. And while we`re back in the past for a moment, there`s this piece in the current Rolling Stone that has John Entwhistle beefing about how the name “Led Zeppelin” was his invention and how he even designed the prototype for your first album cover.
“Well, I don`t know about that at all…Um-m, to start with the thing about the cover is completely wrong. We did that quite separately. The other – well, Keith Moon gave us the name. We`ve always credited him for that.

“I mean, originally there was going to be a band formed from the session for `Beck`s Bolero` – Jeff, myself, Nicky Hopkins, Aynsley Dunbar and…yes, John Paul Jones was in by that time. Maybe John Entwhistle did think of the name and told it to Keith Moon in which case I suppose he might have cause to be a bit angry. The rest of that – I don`t know about.” Page`s native paranoia at critical harassment seeps through the tone of this voice, as the legendary Zep/Rolling Stone feud, and his words momentarily take on a kind of bruised quality. This after all, has been something of an Achilles` Heel for Zeppelin and particularly Page – more probably so than ever because here they are about to release an album, a double set at that, laden with the fruits of two previous years`-worth of labour, even if the album itself took some six weeks to record. And Page himself more omnipresent than ever.
From the daring double 12-string over-dubs that graced “The Song Remains The Same” it`s come to no less than six guitars – “five in harmonies” – intertwining themselves for “Ten Years Gone”, not to mention “In The Light”, Page`s self -proclaimed piece de resistance of the album. And all for the first month of 1975.

“1974”, in Page`s own self-effacingly jocular terms “didn`t really happen, did it?”
A grin and then serious: “1975 will be better.”
From the look of things, Zeppelin are certainly committed to endowing the on-coming year with their own particular zeal. I mean, isn`t there this film of the band on tour in the States nearing the final editing stages? The oft-touted Led Zeppelin movie forever being greeted with the archetypal knowing grin when its existence is broached to one of the band or their entourage, followed by a few visibly mysterious verbal ruminations.
Stuff about “weird fantasy scenes” and such-like. Jimmy Page is more specific. Well not that specific…well, you tell them, Jimmy!
“Well to start with, the film is nearing completion, though we don`t have a title or distributor yet. I`ve yet to mix the sound-track and the final editing hasn`t been completed. I mean, but now it`s starting to get there. We`ve finally got a distinct framework.”

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Direction of the movie has been handled by two different factions – the first Joe Massow whose most notable previous achievement appears to be “Wonderwall” and, more recently, Peter Clifton, who was responsible for the Jimi Hendrix “Live At Olympia” film.
As to the actual form of the film, well, most of the live footage comes from the Madison Square Gardens concerts of `73 and, yes, there are “fantasy sequences” concerning which Page is very cagey about letting anything slip.
“I mean, it would give the whole thing away, wouldn`t it. Like, I went to see `The Exorcist` and the audience was laughing at it because they knew what to expect, whereas if they`d been separated and placed in a room where an unknown film called `The Exorcist` was being screened, the last thing they`d have been doing would be laughing.
“It`s just…well for a start, the fantasy scenes do relate to individual numbers the band play. Like Robert`s bit comes in `Song Remains The Same` and `Rain Song`, Bonzo`s is in his drum solo `Moby Dick,` John`s is `No Quarter` and mine comes in `Dazed And Confused`. Mine`s a bit weird, actually…well so is everyone`s, really. They just happened that way.

Might there be a touch of the `Kenneth Angers` about your bit, then, Mr. Page? Certain oblique references to Aleister Crowley and the like making themselves manifest?
“Oh no (pause). I know what you mean of course, but…”
And the backstage footage? Might we expect candid Zeppelin equivalents to the supposed high-jinx omnipresent throughout Robert Frank`s “Cocksucker Blues”, the…um…vivid account of the Stones` `72 tour?
“Not really. I mean there are a few things…uh…like some chicks offering to give a policeman a…uh `seeing-to`”.
And so the richly-endorsed Zeppelin `road fever` legend-weaving stays firmly anonymous, even in the face of such occurrences as…well there`s that song that Frank Zappa wrote called “Mudshack” about that group who eh…and there was everyone thinking it was the Vanilla Fudge and it turned out to be…say no more.
And even since then, events even more incongruously shaped have occured, centring inevitably around Page himself. For example, 16 magazine, America`s equivalent to the likes of Popswop only-more-legendary have printed, in a style so garish only a magazine coming from L.A. could be responsible, a list of “Who the stars do-it-with” and…uh, “How they do it.”

Page, to say the least, appears to possess a particularly interesting case-history to wit – “Girls, he`s into anything and everything. Those who`ve tried say it`s an experience they`ll never forget.”
I see. Uh well, Mr. Page…
The subject to say the least is not welcomed.
“It`s something you can`t really dwell on because people think if you`re doing it, then the rest of the band are into it too and that would cause all kinds of trouble. No it`s…well all I can say is that it comes down to the term `road fever`.
“I mean I personally can`t play a gig in some godforsaken part of America to god-knows-how-many people and then return to a box. It`s just a total change of life-style, that`s all one can say really.”
But still, without dwelling perhaps on specifics, surely Page had some thoughts on the whole groupie syndrome, with particular reference, say to L.A.?
“I just view it all with amusement. Like the whole Rodney`s scene thing, which is just ridiculous. I mean, you walk in and the next thing you know there are cameras everywhere and you`re ducking under the bar to get away. I mean, Roy Harper has this photograph of me on the point of sticking a pork-pie in a girl`s face.

“Actually the last time I was in L.A., there was this incredible groupie feud which was getting down to razor-blade sandwiches. The competition thing out there is incredible and you`ve got to keep out of the middle of it or else, y`know it…it gets to you too. There`s a new song we`ve done for the album…called `Sick Again`. That about sums it up.
“But then again referring back to the road fever thing, and I mean, at the moment I`ve got to start building up my stamina because everytime I`ve toured the States I`ve returned a physical…and mental wreck. I mean, after the last tour they tried to get me put in a mental hospital. It was going to be either that or a monastery! Ultimately I just went to sleep for a month” (Laughs).
“Sleep” – plenty of it – appears to be the basic Page stamina tonic. That and food.
“This time I`m definitely going to take a `juicer` along with me. I mean, I used to be a vegetarian and that was like committing suicide in America. The last time I ended up just eating hamburgers and at the end I was just a complete mess. This time though – precautions are going to be taken.”

To change the subject then, Aleister Crowley. The great Page obsession or so we`ve been led to believe.
Roy Harper told me less than a couple of months ago that Jimmy was currently writing a book on Crowley which is in fact, untrue though Page is about to open a book-store dealing solely in books on the Occult called “The Equinox” and situated in Kensington`s Holland Street. Page again seems somewhat reluctant to talk about his studies of Crowley at any length. “It`s simply that….I don`t want to do a huge job on Crowley or anything – that doesn`t interest me in the least. I mean if people are into reading Crowley, then they will and it`ll have nothing to do with me. It`s just….well for me, it goes without saying that Crowley was grossly misunderstood.
“I began being interested in him in school after having read this ridiculous book called `The Beast` where the author hadn`t the faintest idea of what Crowley was all about and was totally condesanding (condescending? – Blog Editor) so I took it from there. But I mean, how can anyone call Crowley the world`s most evil man – and that even carried over to the thirties when Hitler was about?

“For a start, he was the only Edwardian to really embrace…not even the New Age so much as simply the 20th Century. Who else would state anything as revolutionary as something like his theory that there would eventually be an equality of the sexes, which is where we`re at right now. It`s like…there`s this incredible body of literature – I mean don`t even bother with the sex thing because that`s all such a bore anyway – and it`s like… there`s a diamond there to be found at the end and it involves a life`s study.”
Page however has made a sizeable inroad into Crowley`s work through even to the notorious forbidden books he`s studied. Not to mention the famous Loch Ness mansion that he bought some time ago.
“All I can say about that place is that there`s this incredible sense of peace and…energy moreover. It`s amazingly stimulating staying up there.”
And the case-history.
“Oh Christ don`t mention that. I mean, post-Crowley…don`t even bother with that…its history is literally littered with suicides and bankruptcies. It`s a whole local thing there. Old wive`s tales abound.”

Any acquaintances of your experienced anything perhaps unforseen?
“One couple flipped out up there (pause). It depends what you bring to the place – expectation-wise.”
The obvious connection from Crawley is to Kenneth Anger, right? Anger, the famous devotee of Crowley`s, the film director of such classic starts as “Invocation of My Demon Brother”, which Page claims extended from its 10-minute length “to seem like a lifetime” when he saw it, “Fireworks” and “Scorpio Rising.”
And now there is “Lucifer Rising”, lasting 93 minutes constantly dogged by such unforseeable circumstances as film mysteriously vanishing (or being stolen). “Lucifer Rising”, which Jimmy Page has done the sound-track for.
“I`ve always got on very well with Anger. He`s a good friend, really. He`s never been as awe-inspiring and unapproachable to me as some would probably tell you. It`s just…one day he asked me to toss some ideas around for a sound-track and I went away feeling something but never being able to really express it, until one day when it all sort of poured out and I got down immediately to recording it. Actually I saw him recently and he was playing my soundtrack against some of the rushes and it came together really nicely.”

Still it`s an even more intriguing series of connections we`re getting here. Kenneth Anger, one-time cohort of Bobby Beausaliel, who reputedly knew one Charles Manson, who again may just have known the guy in L.A. who set out to kill Page when he was passing through with the band over two years ago.
Almost scarey, that.
“I don`t want to think about that at all. I just don`t want to get into that. It`s…people thought there might have been some connection but…there`s a lunatic fringe whether they`re Christian or Satanists or whatever. It`s too risky because they are out there. It`s not a Kharmic backlash or anything like that. Definitely not. There have been lots of little magic happenings but nothing that has really perturbed me.
“But that awareness – obviously you get these magic flashbacks everywhere. On stage, in America – everywhere. What you put out you get back again all the time. The band is a good example of that simply because there`s an amazing chemistry at work there,
if only astrologically.
“Astrologically it`s very powerful indeed. Robert the perfect front man, Leo…Jagger`s a Leo, John Paul Jones and I are uh…stoic Leos (laughs), Bonzo the Gemini. It`s when you`re pushing each other to the limits that the strength of the chemistry comes out and makes itself manifest in this binding of consciousness.”
He`s right y`know. 1974 didn`t really happen, did it? 1975 will be better.

Patches in their most basic form in 1974 - later on they became more advanced, as we all know now.

Patches in their most basic form in 1974 – later on they became more advanced, as we all know now.

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper and you are free to use it as you like. If you use it on your own webpages – please credit me or put up a link to my blog.

This number of New Musical Express also contains articles/interviews with these people: The People of Pan, The Pretty Things, Wings, Bruce Johnston, Elton John, Bad Company, Robert Fripp, Chaka Khan, David Essex, Brian Eno, Noah Howard, Mott The Hoople.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

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