Nazareth

ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth (and a bit about Silverhead) FROM SOUNDS, November 17, 1973

A short, but nice concert review. Enjoy!

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Nazareth Concert Review

By Jerry Gilbert

Poor old Nazareth`s gig at the Rainbow about to be turned into a live album, a sell-out show and a party for the group afterwards, and what happens – a performance which in their eyes at least, was fairly sub-standard.
Not that the band themselves were below par, although there were obvious signs of tension early on, but the sound was terrible both in terms of balance and quality.
All in all they must have caused Roger Glover, who was there to produce the live album, a lot of headaches in spite of the fact that they finally drew the desired response from the audience with a tremendous finish.
Basically it was the old dynamic Nazareth – with that beautifully phased opening to “Night Woman” right on through to “Broken Down Angel”, “Bad Bad Boy” and “Woke Up This Morning” with interludes midway through the set to feature Manny Charlton`s ever improving slide playing and a showcase for the new numbers from “Loud `n` Proud” which included “This Flight Tonight”.
Darrell Sweet huffed and puffed and pounded out some tremendous drum work with Pete Agnew hitting the same volume level with extremely percussive use of bass. Dan McCafferty was also right on form, wailing out strained, piercing vocals, and on another night Nazareth would have scored a resounding victory. It was only the atrocious sound which caused them to falter.
Silverhead, on the other hand were tremendously impressive as the young punk band who pull fewer punches by substituting better music to get results these days. They had the audience on their feet clapping before the end of their set and the rivetting display of Michael De Barres, whose timing is so precise, led the band to a stirring conclusion in the shape and form of “Rock And Roll Band” and “Ace Supreme”, a couple of vintage numbers from their first album. A thoroughly absorbing performance.

 

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Nils Lofgren, John Lennon, Free, Ronnie Lane, Ozzy Osbourne, Carlos Santana, Average White Band, Dale ‘Buffin’ Griffin, Magna Carta, Alice Cooper.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth FROM SOUNDS, November 3, 1973

Just a short review today. I think the Naz fans will like this one.

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Album Review

By Jerry Gilbert

Nazareth: “Loud `n` Proud”
(Mooncrest Crest 4)

Nazareth are one of Britain`s brightest bands because they have found an immaculate compromise between genuine American Southern grit and good old English punk rock. That`s not to say that they compromise their music – far from it, but they are loud and have taken another positive step forward with another master production from Roger Glover. I heard his other proteges recently – an American band called Elf – and was highly disappointed all round, but he has certainly turned Nazareth into one of the most dynamic recording bands with his d.i.y. tenet. Like “Razamanaz”, the band have hired the Pye Mobile and recorded the whole thing virtually live in their own rehearsal room in Scotland, and as always their music is basic, earthy, and strays little beyond the demarcation lines of rock and roll. “Go Down Fighting” is almost reminiscent of Gary Glitter and were it not for the fact that they are setting themselves higher standards all the time I`m sure this would be a likely candidate for their next hit single. As it happens they will probably choose the “Turn On Your Receiver”, although my favourite is the track sandwiched between – “Not Fakin` It” which features a compelling riff from Manny Charlton that is really wasted on the song. Elsewhere they do a great version of Little Feat`s “Teenage Nervous Breakdown” and a dubious version of Dylan`s memorable “Ballad Of Hollis Brown” which is so lyrically perfect that any attempts to intensify the song tend to detract from it – or maybe I`ve just heard it too often to tolerate secondary versions. “This Flight Tonight” is a classic example where something from the singer-songwriter genre can be utilised by a rebel rousing rock band although you may care to sample “Child In The Sun”, the more reflective “other” side of Naz as featured spasmodically on “Exercises”. All in all it`s a very fine album indeed – definitely superior to “Razamanaz” but then again one can`t see the band resting on laurels at this stage in their career.

Loud Nazareth

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dicky Betts (Allman Brothers), Alvin Lee and Mylon Lefevre, Humble Pie, Wishbone Ash, Michael Chapman, Ringo Starr, Neil Innes, Genesis, Refugee, Steve Tilston, Groundhogs, Mike Heron, Uriah Heep.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth FROM SOUNDS, February 10, 1973

Nazareth were lucky enough to be reviewed by Mr. Makowski who at the time must have been a very young man. As some of you know, he has later had a great career writing for some of the biggest rock oriented magazines in the world, and here he submits one short example of why he`s considered one of the great music writers.

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Nazareth Concert review

By Peter Makowski

Right from the start, when drummer Darryl Sweet stepped on stage and began playing a series of wold but controlled rhythms on a large yellow drum kit, it was clear from the audience`s reaction that this was no ordinary night at the Marquee.
When the rest of Nazareth arrived the structure of the number gradually developed into “Night Woman”. The audience were evidently familiar with the band`s repertoire and while the first few numbers were “heavy” they still retained a fine musical quality.
The pace slowed with Ry Cooder`s “Vigilante Man”, featuring some outstanding slide from lead guitarist Manny Charlton, and the band ran through “Paper Sun”, “Woke Up This Morning”, “Alcatraz” as well as a excellent version of Don Nix`s “Going Down” and Don`s “Ruby Baby” and the highlight of the night, “Morning Dew” by Tim Hardin, handled powerfully by vocalist Dan McCafferty.
Nazareth possess all the qualities necessary to ensure a big future, constituting well balanced numbers and an exciting stage act. There`s also a strong sense of audience/band loyalty (it seems many travelled from Scotland to see the gig) and that`s a very valuable commodity these days.

 

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dave Lambert, Beck, Bogert & Appice, Isaac Hayes, Peter Frampton, Rory Gallagher, Dusty Springfield, Syd Barrett, Stevie Wonder, Badger, Judy Sill, Jennie Hahn, Help Yourself, Ian A. Anderson, Pete Townshend.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth FROM SOUNDS, September 9, 1972

It was really great to find this article from the very early days of Nazareth as a recording and touring band. It is incredible to think that Pete Agnew have been in this band for 50 years in 2018. I guess he could play some of the bass lines in his sleep if it was possible. I hope you enjoy this one.

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Yearning for the sweet smell of success

By Jerry Gilbert

Having seen the crowd reactions to Nazareth in Germany and America as well as Britain it is easy to sympathise with the band`s wishes for a little bit of justice on home land.
And last week when I spoke to Dan McCafferty and Pete Agnew on the eve of their second stint in the States there was just a hint of perplexity about it all.
For although they tackle their American campaign with the kind of confidence that got them away to such a great start in the States earlier this year, they would frankly be happier reinforcing their names in Britain.
And as for Germany – well, that`s something else again. They command huge fees in Germany and reckon they play there almost every month. “We even know how to direct the Germans around their own country, telling them which autobahns to take and where to change,” quipped Pete.

NEWCOMERS

At a recent German Festival the band opened the show and were still being cheered back when the last band finished – six hours later.
A combination of bad luck and a recent disappointing album seem to be the main reasons for Nazareth`s failure to get on. They missed the Reading Festival because they were late arriving – and it was a Festival which was crying out for some enthusiastic newcomers to steal the show.
Nazareth might have been the band to do it as indeed they might with their recent album “Exercises” had it lived up to expectations. But alas the word “might” is rarely written into the annals and in Nazareth`s case one feels the band have only themselves to blame for the comparative failure of “Exercises”. For they decided on a drastic swing towards acoustic rock and orchestration when the whole essence of their sound is based on layers of volume and the phenomenal singing of Dan McCafferty.

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WORTHY

“Next time around we want to do an album that will suit Dan`s voice,” Pete explained. “So far we`ve done basically songs and some of them haven`t even been in his range so this one will be for his voice.
“We`ve already got a couple of things pretty certain for the album – `Teenage Nervous Breakdown` which was written by Lowell George of Little Feat and `Hard Living` which we used to do and then started to do again after it was put out as a single in Germany.
“We`re not sure yet about `Going Down` – we heard all the versions of that song, the dire versions and the good versions, and just decided to do our own.”
The Don Nix song shows just how cleverly Nazareth have built the song around McCafferty`s voice and it is already one of the stage favourites and a worthy number despite the fact that it has been recorded by Nix, Freddie King, Chicken Shack and other bands.
And so for the next couple of months there will be little to remind us how underrated Nazareth are (save for a recent splendid performance at the Marquee) as they wend their way about the States.

LOSSES

“We were really excited when we first went to America but this time all we`re talking about is `when the group gets back from America…` We`re doing this tour with Buddy Miles again and also Ginger Baker and as we`re the only band of our kind on the bill we hope to do well,” says Pete.
But both Dan and Pete are adamant that it is at home that they really yearn for the sweet smell of success. “When we first came down from Scotland we did all the wee clubs and since then we`ve done things with Atomic Rooster, Rory Gallagher and the Faces, but we`ve never really followed anything up and done any concentrated work here.
“I think we really took off in Germany after we did a `Beat Club` and the single `Dear John` and the album both took off. So as promoters started to offer the money for us so we began to play there more and more to recoup the losses,” they explained.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: John McLaughlin, Faces, John & Yoko, Eagles, Genesis, Yes, JSD Band.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth FROM NEW MUSICAL EXPRESS, MAY 1, 1976

Always nice to read a live review of Nazareth in their prime. What a band they were! Luckily I have seen them live with the original members and they were quite powerful indeed. One of the best.

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Nazareth
__________
Hammersmith

By Angie Errigo

When the seat next to me collapsed and the tampon sailed over my head and into my lap I was tempted to leave. I reckon managing to hang on to my notebook through the encore deserves a medal for services beyond the call of boogie.
Some concert! Some audience! Some fun?
The assembled patrons looked primarily like the little brothers of the Groundhogs audiences from whom one used to flee, and Rory Gallagher crowds before whom one quakes. Their attitude of getting down and getting with it was brought home to me by two customers behind me. They were about 15 and all through the first set from Widowmaker they howled and stomped, kicked the backs of seats in time and gave whoops of ecstacy.
Suddenly one of them turned to the other and said “They`re not too bad, are they?”
“Ahhh, it`s a bunch of crap” the other replied and resumed whooping.

Widowmaker are nothing of they aren`t killingly loud. Steve Ellis has got something, but it`s hard to say what it is, at that volume. Ariel Bender, pinched into the most awfully unbecoming trousers and wearing a Cute Hat, leapt over, under, around and particularly in front of the other members of the band quite a bit. His posing is rather tentative, like he`s pretty convinced he`s a Star but he doesn`t want to get beat up in the dressing room for strutting too much in one go.

The drummer does a lot of groovy grimacing, like a cross between the village idiot and the sulphate strangler, but he`s okay. The second guitarist looks like he escaped from Sweet, but he did quite nicely while Ariel was traipsing around, and the bassist is dandy.

I don`t really like their belligerence but Ellis is a worthy belter and they`ll probably do quite well if they can stomach each other long enough to establish themselves.
I had no idea Nazareth are so popular, or so head splitting. Dan McCafferty has the most alarming set of pipes this side of Ethel Merman, and the marvel is that he can scream so loud and still produce shades and contrasts in his vocals and put over lyrics so well.
The first three numbers – “Telegram”, “Razamanaz” and “Bad Bad Boy” – were beyond criticism. How can you be analytical about being run over by some crazy, out of control, sonic boogie machine? Guitarist Manny Charlton (in competition with Bender for Funny Trousers of the Night in rather extraordinary black leather britches) is big on the breakneck chops, and bassist Pete Agnew and drummer Darrell Sweet come on like their barbarian ancestors who freaked out the Romans by screaming and bagpiping like loonies.

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Naz`s version of “Love Hurts”, which was Jim Capaldi`s recent success here, is completely different and surprisingly nice, combining as they do the pretty melody and subtle rhythms with that grotesque volume.

The rest of the performance was more varied. “Loretta” from the new “Close Enough for Rock and Roll” lp and “Changing Time” from “Hair of the Dog” reeked with classically stylized heavy metal riffs. “Honky Tonk Downstairs”, a number from McCafferty`s solo lp, featured a punchy, countryish delivery from Dan, and the folk song “The Long Black Veil” was sung quite prettily and mercifully acapella by McCafferty, Agnew and Sweet.

Most of this was interspersed with the predictably derivative guitar solos, beefy bass breaks and rapid shrieks that put hair on the boys` chests. For “Whiskey Drinking Woman”, “This Flight Tonight” and “Woke Up This Morning” everybody was either on their seat or down front getting their money`s worth.

I`m sure if I`d tanked up a bit beforehand I would have felt more rollicking myself, but older and more sober than most of the audience I found the variety of objects flying through the air, the breaking seats and the mindless, relentless licks curiously unmoving.
After lots of hollering and clapping they came back for “Broken Down Angel” which featured a rather good sing-along from the audience on chorus. I must say I`d prefer an audience like this myself if I was up there. When they want you they really want you, and they sure aren`t embarrassed to act crazy.

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Travel was easy and cheap in the seventies.

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of New Musical Express also contains articles/interviews with these people: Buffy Sainte-Marie, Graham Parker, Louis Jordan, Jimi Hendrix, Horace Silver, Jimmy Castor, Bill Bruford, Rick Wakeman.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 15 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.