Ray Telford

ARTICLE ABOUT Russ Ballard FROM SOUNDS, August 17, 1974

I feel for Mr. Ballard, one of the greatest songwriters in the pop era, who never “took off” with his solo career. He deserves it more than most – just look at all those artists/bands who have covered a song that he wrote: Agnetha Fältskog, Bay City Rollers, Roger Daltrey, Kiss, Night Ranger, Rainbow, At Vance, America, Santana, Bruce Dickinson, Uriah Heep and lots, lots more….
You should definitely listen to an album of his!

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Ballad Of A Guitar Man

By Ray Telford

Way up there at the KG publicity office Russ Ballard lines up the Detroit Spinners` “I`m Coming Home”, for a second turn on a dilapidated sound system that scarcely does justice to Thom Bell`s masterful production. But even so it has Russ listening hard and he is evidently grooving on what he hears.
Earlier this year Russ announced his departure from Argent, a band who`d stuck together for four years and whose personnel had always, on the face of it, seemed indivisable. All their press interviews previously had hinted at the closeness and feeling of musical brotherhood within the group. To an outsider the policy could have read something like the band that stays together wins together and Argent were just beginning to win.
Hit singles and at least a couple of high selling albums plus a reputation for being the nicest guys seemed good enough reason for them to continue along that safe and comfortable path. A renegade in their midst was unthinkable yet here was Ballard saying he didn`t mind if there happened to be a few duff notes on his first solo album – if the overall feel was right then he was happy.
A far cry indeed from Argent`s high precision and faultless musical technology.
At this moment Russ has all but finished his album. Most of the tracks with him playing electric guitar, bass, drums and piano, are all in the can and the results he says are beyond his expectations: “After being in a band so close knit as Argent were,” he says, “and the way that everyone used to lean on each other – to come right out and do something so isolated and on my own has been an immense challenge. I always felt I could do it and as far as I`m concerned it has worked to my satisfaction.”

Whereas Argent were primarily a musical construction kit overtly concerned with the correctness and mathematics of what they were playing. Russ is trying to infuse in the new album a degree of personalised soul – a slant all his own which he eventually hopes to be recognised through.
“It`s a reaction to all I`ve been through in the past,” he tells you. “This album is just an album of songs which I hope people will remember and associate with me. This is my contribution to music, or to my kind of music, much more so than what I did with Argent. With them I was getting too involved in some ways – in ways that I knew just weren`t right for me as a musician.
“I mean, I`m not John McLaughlin and I don`t want to be playing like him. I`m not that involved in that kind of music, though I can listen to it and appreciate everything these guys are trying to do.”
Helping out on Russ`s album have been a horn section, largely made up of Gonzalez musicians, who he says have lent invaluable assistance in getting exactly what was wanted. The aim, Russ says, was to present the music with plenty of spaces.

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SATISFACTION

“There`s also strings on the album,” Russ goes on, “but they`ve been arranged in such a way that they maybe only play one extended chord at the end of a song. I`m trying to keep it from being overdone. The main thing for me is to keep it from becoming too schmaltzy. It has to be kept funky. The good thing is that all the guys who`ve been helping out have all been around a bit and if I explain to them just what I want it`s done.
“The rhythm tracks I did myself mainly because I felt I could do them to my own satisfaction. There`s been times before when I`ve said to a drummer just play it simple and straight forward and they always put in some extra fill which I didn`t want and you say `no I want it this way` and they go in again and play it the way they hear it which still isn`t what I wanted. OK so I do it myself and there`s a couple of misplaced beats but it feels right and that`s the thing that matters.”
Later this year, Russ says will see the emergence of a Russ Ballard band. The exact line-up remains fluid in his mind, though he`s aiming for bass, drums and a co-lead guitarist to enable him to switch from guitar to piano as required as a working basis.

FEELING

“Again,” Russ predicts, “it`ll be a simple thing”. It`s easy to write a piece of music which has everything going on but the hardest thing to learn is to know what to leave out. I`ve heard so many guitarists who clutter up a song simply through overplaying but I`d rather write a song with four chords in it than one with 24 chords if the one with four sounded right. It`s not something you can put into words because it has to do with feeling.
“With Argent we used to do so many overdubs to get something sounding technically correct but I`d rather it sounds human even if there are mistakes.”
Though Russ admits that recording nowadays is probably the most important selling point for a band, he also fervently believes in the power of live sets: “From a writing point of view I believe you must be on the road to come up with the real goods – for the songs to sound fresh and spontaneous etc. – but a piece of recorded music is there for ever whereas people can watch and enjoy a live gig and forget all about it in a year`s time.
“That way you have to keep proving what you`re capable of – which isn`t necessarily a bad thing.

PERFORMERS

“I think the Beatles wrote their best stuff when they were on the road. I say that because if you`re at home all the time there`s nothing to drive for. I`ve always gone for an actual performance in the music – like in some of the early Presley records there were a few duff notes but the performance was always brilliant. Again that applies to the Beatles so much – they were as much performers as they were musicians.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Tim Hardin, Joan Baez, Mike Garson, Mike Oldfield, ELO, Pink Floyd, Herbie Hancock, Queen, Wendy Waldman, Alan Stivell, Contraband.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Nazareth FROM SOUNDS, July 20, 1974

When it comes to music, the Scottish people really should be proud of having such a great band as Nazareth in their midst. They were one of the most popular bands when I grew up in the 70s, and at school you either liked Nazareth or you liked Abba. There was nothing else for a while, and the imagery of Nazareth`s album covers were difficult not to notice and be impressed by as a young boy. That`s not to say that I wasn`t studying Abba`s album covers as much, looking for Agnetha…. Oh well, here is a good one with Dan McCafferty from the vaults.

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Back in the USA

Proving for the second week running that he has a way with `phones, Ray Telford talks to Dan McCafferty from Florida.

As Billy Walker so succinctly put it after I`d put down the phone on Dan McCafferty who`d called from West Palm Beach, Florida, last week, “Nazareth are nice guys”. Nice guys they are too and so is Bill (he`s managed to keep that way by assiduously avoiding most of the music business assholes and as a result has maintained a reasonably normal head). He also digs Nazareth`s music to some degree which makes his observations on the Naz all the more palatable and genuine – yet another rarity in the music business.
Nazareth are now into the last week of their fourth US tour, a tour which Dan reports has won them a lot of ground with American punters even despite the fact that their last visit there ended up as a complete non event.
The last projected American tour for the band was in January of this year when they were due to support (along with S. Quo) some outfit which was going out under the name of Fleetwood Mac. It was not, of course, the real thing and rather than become part of the great Fleetwood hype Dan and the boys opted out and flew back to their Scottish homes for a few days respite before jetting it to Switzerland to finish off a new album, the recently released “Rampant”.
If Nazareth hadn`t sold so many albums as they have over the past couple of years then the ready excuse would`ve been of course that they were primarily a band to be heard live and that the magic didn`t quite become so apparent when the music was transferred onto magnetic tape, but the fact that they have sold albums in vast quantities both here and on the Continent proves that lots of people hold the band and their hard, brittle rock and roll in pretty high esteem.

As for the States… well Dan reckons it takes a few cracks at the place before you even begin to think you`re getting a foothold and this present tour he guardedly told me had achieved precisely that. The albums released in America so far, discounting “Rampant”, have been doing good business and the interest from press and the radio stations has been more than encouraging.
“All the same,” Dan needlessly informed me, “America is such a bloody big place. You can break big with the radio stations and the people in one State and maybe the neighbouring State too if you`re lucky but then there`s still the other side of the country to come to terms with.
“That`s why so many bands touring here see it as an endless round of gigs with so much hard slog you wouldn`t believe it. At least if you play just one whizz bang tour in Britain you can be sure that everybody is going to pick up on how well you`ve done. It seems like it`s more instant – that`s really the big difference.”
On the present tour Nazareth have been sharing bills with what Dan calls a string of good crowd pullers and are pleased with what they have achieved in terms of audience reaction and general musical progress. In Washington, he says, they met up with Little Feat, who apparently have not fallen apart contrary to all rumours this side of the pond.
It was one of Lowell George`s songs (Little Feat`s slide guitar player), in fact that Naz took it on themselves to record on the “Razamanaz” album and which has since become a main feature of the band`s live sets.
“It really was a great night,” confirmed Dan. “The whole thing was perfect and they certainly didn`t seem to me like a group who were about to bust up. Anybody who plays like they do really have no right to call it a day. They`re that good.”

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On their return from America next week, Dan looks forward once again to being with his wife and son at their home near Dunfermline. He admits never to have had much time for the supposed trappings of a pop star`s life, and winces at the thought of having to leave his family at home while the band are on the road.
“There`s too many tense moments on a tour like this to have your wife and kids around. It wouldn`t be fair on them and it wouldn`t be fair on the band either `cause it is work. There`s no way you can call it a family way of life and luckily all our wives realise and respect that.”
The new Nazareth album, Dan happily reports is well in hand as far as suitable material goes. They had hoped to record some of the songs in America but time wasn`t on their side and so plans had to be shelved.
“We have written a few things, though we haven`t had a proper chance to rehearse them. The only chance we`ve had is to write them roughly on acoustic guitars in hotel rooms and then try them out at sound checks which isn`t really much good but the ideas are there and that`s what`s important. We`re due to come back to the States towards the end of the year and we`ll almost certainly be recording some stuff then.
“I`d like to try that studio in Florida where Clapton did his new album – there are some really nice sounds on that. Meanwhile we`re dying to get home and back to some sanity. We need to see our families again. Too right we do.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: The Graeme Edge Band, Robin Trower, Man, Nigel Thomas, Chris Stainton, Chilli Willi, Robert Wyatt, J.J. Cale, Dobie Gray, Roger Daltrey, Sonny Rollins, Druick and Lorange, The SHF Band.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Thin Lizzy FROM SOUNDS, March 23, 1974

This one should be very interesting for all fans of both Thin Lizzy and Gary Moore. Too bad this interview wasn`t longer but we will take what we can get in relation to these artists. Enjoy.

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Lizzy: back in action

By Ray Telford

Phil Lynott, standing long and lean over the control desk at Decca`s Tollington Park studio, swapped toothy grins of approval with Gary Moore as the backing track for one of the band`s new songs ripped from the huge suspended speakers.
The sessions had been booked for work to begin on a new Thin Lizzy album. Having almost fully recovered from the swift and totally unexpected departure of guitarist Eric Bell last Christmas, Phil reckoned the best plan would be to get the band with Eric`s replacement Gary Moore back into recording as soon as possible.
Eric`s splitting from Lizzy brought with it more outcry from dedicated fans than they`d anticipated. On the previous two Lizzy albums currently available – “Shades Of A Blue Orphanage” and “Vagabonds Of The Western World” – he was seen to be fast developing a unique and refreshing approach to playing the electric guitar and his leaving, according to Phil was subtly assisted by the fact that Eric`s ideas about how things should sound were not wholly in tune with the general direction of the band.
“The thing about Eric collapsing from nervous exhaustion,” went on Phil, “was played up a bit – I mean it wasn`t so bad as it appeared to be in some of the papers. But as a musician Eric is a kind of delicate guy and it shows through in his playing – I think he was getting to feel a bit uncomfortable playing with us just before he left.”
Eric left the band after their Christmas gig in Dublin shortly after they`d begun an Irish tour. At two days` notice Gary Moore stepped in and completed the tour: “There was about two days` rehearsal with Gary,” said Phil, “and after that it really sounded a whole lot better than we`d ever dreamed it would. That Irish tour and the present English tour has got us working together pretty well.

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Gary Moore`s guitar has added a sting to Lizzy`s music that was previously missing. He employs a lot more attack than Eric Bell, a style which also happens to suit Phil`s zippy bass style a whole lot better. Before joining Thin Lizzy Gary had first made a name for himself during his time with Skid Row, an amazingly under-rated Irish trio from three years back who failed to get off the ground largely through business and management. He then formed his own Gary Moore Band who suffered a similar fate but through it all Gary`s reputation as one of the most exciting and inventive guitar players stuck fast.
“I think Gary is naturally an adaptable musician – not that he ever sacrifices his own thing because he`s too strong a player for that to happen, but as far as this band goes he`s fitted in really nicely.
“Gary`s a good writer too and the amount of ideas he`s come up with for the new album is incredible. There`s like a revitalising thing going on right now which has given everybody a bit of a lift. There`s more than enough material for this album, probably even the stuff we`ve written since Gary joined would be enough.”
Lizzy`s charts success last year with “Whisky In The Jar” Phil still reckons was a good thing for the band. Certainly it never landed them with any kind of one hit wonder tag because the single was innocently incidental, a pleasant surprise you might say which didn`t seem to affect the group`s hipper club following. Up to now the main of Lizzy`s material has come from Phil whose lyrical talents have grown considerably over the space of two albums. He sees “Vagabonds Of The Western World” as something of a transformatory experience: “At the time we were doing it it felt right and there were some good songs on the LP. We spent a lot of time thinking about how we wanted the thing to feel and getting moods right. I think it showed a little more of true potential which up to then maybe hadn`t shown through.”
The new album the band are co-producing with Nick Tauber with whom they also worked on “Vagabonds Of The Western  World”: “As things stand right now,” said Phil, “we`re happy enough about the band in the studio. The material is strong and mature enough and we`re getting it down exactly how we want it.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Marsha Hunt, Dave Dee, Robert Wyatt, Procol Harum, Golden Earring, Kilburn & The High Roads, Cat Stevens, Zzebra, Johnny Winter, Elkie Brooks, Alvin Lee, Hudson-Ford, Canton Trig.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Yes FROM SOUNDS, October 20, 1973

If you are a Yes fan and never did read this article before, then you are in for a treat. A really great one done by Mr. Telford, where Mr. Howe speaks about influences, opening a guitar shop and a whole lot of other interesting subjects.
Have a nice read, and by the way, thank you to everyone that comment, share and “like” the articles. Much appreciated and a bit of inspiration for me to go on with this project. I salute you all!

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Yes: so far so good

By Ray Telford

So far so good for Yes.
It`s a little over three years now since the second Yes album “Time And A Word” took off to great heights and consequently endowed the group with a healthy amount of self respect which they`ve never lost.
Every album since has been looked on by Yes devotees as a significant landmark in music. Their following now probably represents something like the fan worship that would`ve been King Crimson`s had they carried on making albums as spectacular as “In The Court Of The Crimson King”. But, as Steve Howe points out, it hasn`t been plain sailing all the way.

SPLITS

Steve took over guitar in the band after the wiry Pete Banks split not long after the first album had been completed. The next exit came from keyboard player Tony Banks who was replaced by Rick Wakeman then a year ago perhaps the biggest surprise of all hit the fans – Alan White, fresh from the trials of being with Joe Cocker`s big band, took over drums from Bill Bruford.
The musical changes that have taken place within the overall Yes complex have always seemed to happen naturally something which the albums prove on their own. There are no really dramatic departures in style and presentation from one album to the next. The process, however, as Steve points out, can take time: “Of course it`s taken someone like Alan a bit of time to work himself fully into the band and that to me is something which really shows through on the new album. He`s changed the group exactly the way we hoped he would. That`s what I mean by saying that every important move that has to be made is thought about very carefully.

NO PANIC

“We feel `Tales From Topographic Oceans` has no panic points in the same way as `Close To The Edge` had. It`s a lot less intense and it`s the only Yes album I can play at home without having to drop everything to concentrate on the music. I`m talking to you now but if `Close To The Edge` was playing I`d have to stop and listen. I couldn`t relax doing anything else.”
The material trappings of being a successful rock and roll musician are not readily apparent within the walls of the Howe family`s Hampstead home. These the cautious Mr. Howe has avoided assiduously. He says people are beginning to see through the myths that surround popular musicians: “They`re beginning to see that there just isn`t THAT amount of money involved in it all. Sure, a band like Yes who are very popular in America as well as this country must make a bit of money but there are so many other things that have to be paid from what you earn. Yes are rich enough in music and that`s the way everyone wants it to stay. I wouldn`t go out and fight for money but I would for music.”
As an instrumentalist Howe is one of the most precise and exacting guitarists to have emerged the past couple of years. His style draws from an impressive number of influences and everything he does is tempered to perfection or very close to it.
“Originally I never used to listen to any other rock guitarists – the only people I heard were jazz players like Tal Farlow and, of course, Django and classical people like Julian Bream. These are the musicians I find myself always going back to because what I find most exciting about them is that they`re all virtuosos and someone like Bream is really playing music for now the way nobody else is. In 20 years time his music will be looked on as an interpretation of the times in which it was recorded. It`s also the difference between commercialism and playing to create something which is what I`m trying to do.”

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Steve`s love of guitars is probably best measured by the fact that he has a collection of thirty which he values at around £8,000 (The same as around £90,000 in 2018). His American trips of course helped him boost the collection considerably to the tune of gathering stray rare Gibsons for an incredibly low amount of money.
“What I`m just about ready to do,” announced Steve, “is to open a guitar shop in Hampstead. Eventually I`ll want to sell a few of my guitars anyway so that`s a good way to go about it. I`d like to try and make as good a shop as possible for guitarists who want a really personal guitar because every guitarist knows exactly which is the one for him. For Hendrix it was a Stratocaster, Steve Cropper`s Telecaster and where would Clapton have been if it hadn`t been for that amazing three pick-up Les Paul?”
On the subject of rock guitarists Steve admits there are few who he has liked straight off but then again so very few of them can be classed as virtuosos.
“I loved some of the stuff Hendrix did, I`m talking about Hendrix because he`s the guy that springs to everybody`s mind when the subject of popular guitarists crops up, but I was cutting myself off from most of his things. To my ear he never seemed to treat a song as a song because there were too many distractions going on around the lyrics. I think I`d have liked him better if he`d been more selective about what he played.
“I don`t like to hear a guitarist who pushed all the time. They should be able to drop back as a fill out instrument as well as jumping out front. Most of the groups I was in before Yes were guitar based trios which was fun for a while but it was really limiting when you wanted to come up with something special. The interchange between guitar and organ in Yes is perfect for me.”
As with his choice of guitars Steve is just as exacting about his studio and stage amps. He invariably records through a battery of Fender amps and on live gigs uses a Fender Showman.

FUTURE

Since joining Yes Steve admits he has had to re-think and modify a lot of his early attitudes to guitar playing. The scope offered him within the group initially he says seemed immense but he was also made aware that what he chose to play had to fit and complement the overall texture of the band.
“It`s a process of constantly examining from a distance exactly what you`re doing and where you`re going. Luckily, I think Yes have succeeded in that respect more than most bands. We tend to think of the future more than anybody.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Free, Elliot Mazer, Kevin Coyne, Gentle Giant, Grand Funk, Judy Collins, Dr. John, Stackridge, Eumir Deodato, Camel, Jerry Lawson and Jimmy Hayes.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Geordie FROM SOUNDS, October 13, 1973

A really good one for fans of Geordie or maybe of Brian Johnson in AC/DC. This one have some interesting thoughts from Brian at the end of the interview.
Band leader Vic Malcolm was the great songwriter of this band and he was still writing great rock music as late as in 2014 with his band called “Dynamite”. If you like no-nonsense rock`n`roll in the style of AC/DC, this is the band for you. Check them out here: https://youtu.be/cOu1BJy4GLk

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Don`t be fooled by the name

By Ray Telford

Brian Johnson, Brian Gibson and Tom Hill when they`re together never stay quiet for very long.
Last week they were assembled at their manager`s office for a swift interview before it was time to go on to Lansdowne recording studios where the finishing touches are being added to the new Geordie album. Absent from the little gathering was the groups mainspring Vic Malcolm who Brian Johnson explained had virtually been living at Lansdowne the past couple of days “Just to make sure everything`s being done right”.
The two Brians and Tom, when they`re in good shape, virtually terrorise their manager`s clerical staff and their young, unsuspecting PR man into fetching cups of tea and satisfactory publicity shots respectively: “If that gets used in the paper Molina, I`ll bloody well sue you”, Tom Hill forewarned the PR man who in turn said nothing but slipped the offending pic into an envelope and handed it over to me to use if I so cared. The whole thing, though, was carried out in good, clean cat and mouse type fun which is the norm whenever any of the Geordie`s are around.
Before being asked to join the group by Vic Malcolm little more than a year ago Brian Johnson had never played a pro gig with a group in his life, though he`d been with a long string of semi-pro Newcastle groups and had got himself a healthy reputation as a rock vocalist: “Vic came to my house one night”, Brian carried on through his undiluted goerdie accent, “He said he liked my singing and all that but he said I just stood there like a sack of tatties. That`s what he said. Anyway, after I joined the whole stage thing came very easy to me. I get up to things on stage now that I`d never dreamed of a couple of years ago.”

It might be a fair guess to say that Geordie`s apparently unbounded enthusiasm and love for the music business could well be down to the fact that they have achieved no mean measure of success in a comparatively short space of time. In the past year, they`ve released four singles, all of which notched up impressive sales: “The first single to break for us, which was `You Can`t Do That`, broke the bottom end of the charts towards the end of last year. At that time we had a lot of really good luck – good gigs, the ones which matter, and after the discos had picked up on the record it spread to the radio and that gave us a lot of exposure.”
Basically Geordie feature mostly Vic Malcolm songs (all the singles have been written by him), and their few diversions into non-group songs have all been given Vic`s arrangements. The immortal “Geordie`s Lost His Liggie” from the first LP, being probably the best example.
“All the songs on the new album,” said Tom Hill, “have been written by Vic, though this time the group have contributed much more in terms of coming up with ideas at recording sessions. The only non-original song we`ve done is “House Of The Rising Sun” which we`re very pleased with. It follows pretty close to the way The Animals did it but our version is a bit heavier – it`s punchier.”
Geordie, much to their disillusionment, still find themselves being compared to Slade more often than they feel is justified. No one disputes the similarity of appeal between the two bands which, when you come to think of it is probably the reason why the two were billed together at a London Palladium concert last year. Of course, at that time Geordie hadn`t yet experienced their first hit. Close listening to the Geordie albums show Vic Malcolm as a talented composer of pop songs plain and simple and his style really is a long way removed from Noddy Holder`s impact which has tended to remain on the same level throughout all the major Slade singles hits. True, the production strokes that are pulled on Geordie`s behalf may discolour the argument but beneath it all they have the feel of a band who deserve their glitter the same as anybody else.

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The next Geordie album following “Don`t Be Fooled By The Name”, Brian J. says, will be a live one. They intend to record it early next year at a gig in Newcastle City Hall, a venue the group have never yet played as their past home appearances have always happened at the cosier Mayfair Ballroom where they have been No. 1 draw for the past year or so.
“A live album,” said Brian, “is something I`ve been looking forward to. There are things we get into on stage musically that have never happened in the studio. There`s this certain song that goes down no bother live but we tried to record for the album last week and I couldn`t hit it. I tried handling it everyway I knew how but it just wasn`t right. Obviously the band is naturally happier playing live than recording, though we record a lot easier than we use to. And to do the live album in Newcastle should be something else.”
Geordie have already had one abortive attempt at an American tour earlier this year. Brian, however, seems in no great rush to reach US audiences because his canny Newcastle common sense tells him: “By all accounts Slade died in America. I hear they went down well in and around New York but outside that area they died. Now if people are comparing us to Slade in this country the chances are we wouldn`t do too good in the States – and that means losing a lot of money.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dave Mattacks, David Crosby, The JSD Band, Phil Manzanera, Status Quo, Jerry Shirley, Sutherland Bros. and Quiver, Jo Jo Gunne, Allan Taylor.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.