Status Quo

ARTICLE ABOUT Status Quo FROM SOUNDS, May 17, 1975

Did the mighy Quo ever play a a bad concert in the 70s? I am sure they did, but there weren`t many. Here`s another one of those good ones.
Read on!

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Quo`s May blitz

By Pete Makowski

It may be unlucky for some people but to Quo 13 years represents a longevity that equals and even surpasses many well established bands. And to celebrate this little event the band decided to undertake an anniversary tour opening at Leicester`s De Montfort Hall last Thursday.
It was, as expected, a raging success and also revealed a new musical side to the band in a set that lasted over one and three quarter hours and was executed at a ball-breaking pace. The audience was, as expected, solid Quo fans, and being Quo fans they made sure it was an event to be remembered.
The evening opened with a set from The Pretty Things, another band who have been around for a while. Their set was impressive but not properly paced, too many long drawn out `come on clap your hands` sessions. The last time I saw them, their set was tighter, slicker and had more success. Still a really ace rock band.
Quo`s set opened up with a swirling mass of dry ice, the closest the band have ever got to theatrics. The band got onto the stage and it was Blitzkreig. They opened up the set, as they did last tour, with `Love Me When I`m Down`, with Alan Lancaster stooped over his bass, growling the vocals with fire and brimstone. A sea of denims surged forwards as Rossi belted out the vocals of `I Saw The Light`, off the `On The Level` album.
Next a change of guitars and Parfitt took the microphones, slowing the pace down with `Nightride` and then bringing it back up to the normal Quo energy level with `Little Lady`.
Silence fell over the hall as Rossi`s hoarse vocals accompanied by a quiet (would you believe?) guitar backing played `Most Of The Time` which developed into an extra heavy weight twelve bar.

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Then came the contrast with a slow tempo country ditty by the name of `Claudie`, featuring some strong harmonies. This was followed by a trip down memory lane in form of `Gerundula`, featuring, wait for it, Rick Parfitt on acoustic guitar, Rossi playing a Les Paul (the first time I`ve seen him play a different guitar) and Alan Lancaster on rhythm guitar… have Quo gone acoustic?
No, but at last they have found a way to pace their set without killing the energy level, the audience didn`t seem to mind and the atmosphere was brought up to an almost electrifying peak with a medley featuring `Backwater`, `Just Take Me` and `Forty Five Hundred Times`, with some surprisingly competent guitar work from Rossi, whose style is usually more forceful than constructive.
These numbers also displayed John Coughlan`s hard tireless attacking drum playing that provides the backbone to Quo`s solid wall of sound. Next came a series of powerchord boogie workouts with Rossi, looking a bit worse of wear by now, running up and down the length of the stage, with Lancaster and Parfitt following his example.
`Roll Over Lay Down`, `Big Fat Momma` and `Don`t Waste My Time` had the crew rocking from side to side. The amazing thing about Quo gigs is that no matter how frenzied the audience is there are never any attempts to storm the stage even though there are no barriers and minimal security.
The set ended with `Roadhouse Blues`, featuring the infamous sailor`s hornpipe and when you see a few thousand kids jigging it`s quite something. The band returned with an encore featuring `Caroline`, `Mean Girl` and an amazing drum solo from John Coughlan, culminating with `Bye Bye Johnny`. Hasn`t anyone told these guys we`ve got an energy crisis? Great stuff.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!
The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT John Coghlan (Status Quo) FROM SOUNDS, October 19, 1974

The engineer mentioned in the article, Damon Lyon Shaw, lives in Dorchester, England these days and it seems that he is still a active in the music business, or at least he was in 2018. He worked as an engineer for most of his professional life, and even though he may not be the most recognised name among rock fans, he has worked on a lot of great album, among them several of the albums that Status Quo made in the 70s. Here`s to you Mr. Shaw – I hope you are rightly proud of the work you have done! Cheers!

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Quo`s nifty thumper

Pete Makowski talks to John Coglan

It`s difficult to assess the qualities of a musician. Take Quo f`rinstance, good time music, the regular four beats to a bar etc. But I`m sure if Rossi and co were confronted with more complex music they`d be able to handle it with some ease.
This brings me to the band`s thumper John Coglan who is a very nifty drummer indeed. It`s his powerful percussion along with Lancaster`s driving bass that add a lot to the band`s sound. So how did John find himself in the ranks of Quo?
“When I left school, I really didn`t know what I was going to do. I thought my future was going to be in the Air Force. It was there that I first became interested in drumming. I knew a few guys who played drums and I bought a kit and a couple of us formed a band, basically playing Shadows type material. I met Francis who had a band going, they used to rent a garage and rehearse there. They had a drummer, who was okay but er… how can I put it, oh yeah, my drum kit was better than his. I had a blow with them and I joined the band.”
I asked John if there were any drummers that he was keen on in his early years. “Yeah, I really used to like Brian Bennet (The Shadows) because he was basically a technical drummer for his time. There weren`t many good drummers about then.
“I used to have a Ludwig Super Classic kit, which was one of the early ones and is really good, I`ve still got it at home. I`ve got a big Premier which I use on stage and I`m fairly happy with. I use a small Premier in the studio.”

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I asked John if there was anything he was dissatisfied with in drumkits. “Yeah, the whole idea of the snare being fitted to a drum underneath is totally wrong. It`s not adequate because the strands tend to stretch, I think it`s a real primitive idea.
“Premier came out with an idea, the fixed snare, where you can release the snare at the same tension, that`s okay, but I tried it a few times at gigs but I wasn`t really satisfied with it.”
Quo are currently in the studio recording, I asked John if he was concerned about getting a good studio sound. “I`m very fussy. Our engineer, Damon Lyon Shaw, has been great in helping us develop our sound in the studio. We`ve got this new idea in how to record, by making a tunnel in the studio which makes a very big sound.”
I asked John what kind of things he practises at home.
“I don`t practice any rudiments. It`s okay to do those things but is it necessary for what Status Quo do? There are guys like Charlie Watts who`s a very basic drummer, but it fits the Rolling Stones. People say `he`s no good because he doesn`t do much` that`s rubbish, you don`t know what he can do.
“I like tidy drummers like Watts who play straight and when they do break it`s effective.”
The all round drummer`s drummer has to be Zep`s Bonzo Bonham. “He`s the guvnor. The original rock drummer and probably the most effective. The thing about a lot of young drummers that I`ve seen is that they try to play too much and it doesn`t seem to carry the band. It doesn`t kick the band up the arse. If you can play loud and technical and manage to get both things across, then you got it sussed.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Humble Pie, Stephen Stills, Robin Trower, Big John Vary, Aj Webber, Rolling Stones, Syreeta Wright, Wishbone Ash, Mike McGear, Bert Jansch, Rufus, Minnie Riperton, Slade, Bob Henrit.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Status Quo FROM SOUNDS, August 10, 1974

It is very strange, but the most successful bands of all time in the UK didn`t ever really “make it” in the USA. They tried, but ultimately they had to admit failure there. Not that it mattered much, as the rest of the world clearly loved them very much. Well, it is America`s loss, and our gain. Who wouldn`t like to have these fun, loveable guys around, turning out their catchy boogie-rock? I would.

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The simple plod along Status trail

Andy McConnell reports on Quo`s progress from a pool side in Los Angeles

“We`ll plod along steadily. Things have happened to us over the years but we get over them. We keep getting knocked down, then knocked down again but we get up again. We`ll carry on and in the end we`ll look up and suddenly realise that we`ve made it,” said Francis `Mike` Rossi from beside Status Quo`s Los Angeles hotel swim pool.
The singer / guitarist / spokesman`s comment seemed to sum up his band`s simple philosophy. After ten hard years on the road in England and Europe the band have `suddenly realised` that they have made it over there. They have had a number one and a number two album and a series of top singles in England; statistics reflected all over Europe.
Now it`s the turn of the States.
“The first tour over here was good,” said Rossi in his heavy Cockney accent. “We got good reactions and we were told by everybody that things were very promising.”
Then they were `knocked down`…
“The second was a disaster. We started off at the beginning of the year with the Fleetwood Mac that wasn`t Fleetwood Mac. It was that mock-up Fleetwood. The tour started to fall to bits right from the start. People were throwing bottles at them and demanding their money back. Everybody was having rows. Then we were supposed to do some dates with Nazareth but they didn`t come over. I caught pleurisy, Richard Parfitt got something so we packed up and went home.”
Since the first tour Quo`s popularity has soared so much in England that it must be difficult for guitarists Francis and Richard, bassist Alan Lancaster and drummer John `Spud` Coghlan to come out and tour the States as second or even third on the bill.

“Yeah, it`s hard to come out here and have to start from scratch again,” the unshaven guitarist agreed. “Over here we don`t mean a thing, but in England we have reached a point where we can ask for whatever we want; each tour is bigger and better than the last one. We can have things there that we can`t over here. It`s a difficult psychological thing.”
The band had arrived in LA the night before. They had flown over from London for the start of a six week tour, opening with Rory Gallagher at Santa Monica.
Although it`s difficult to categorise bands` music, Quo`s is a sort of London 70`s R&B, I suggested.
“Yeah, that`s a nice phrase. I like that. It`s hard to say what it is but that sorta sums it up. It`s a kinda raunchy R&B. I dunno, it`s just something we get off on,” he said admiring his rapidly tanning chest.
But Quo`s music has not always been in that bag. No way.
The band knew each other from years back. They`ve been together as a four-piece for almost ten years. Francis knew Alan from the time he was 12-years-old. They found `Spud` two years later. They met second guitarist Richard in 1965.
Under the name of The Spectors they played as support band for touring solo acts in England. Anybody from the Dixie Cups to Madeline Bell, now of Blue Mink. They toured for a short while as Traffic until Stevie Winwood`s outfit of the same name broke onto the scene.
Eventually they chose Status Quo as a name. Their first single release was a weird little number, “Pictures Of Matchstick Men”.
“It got to the top five in England, number seven over `ere and higher in all sortsa places over the world. We used to think that if we ever had a hit single all our troubles would be over,” lamented Rossi with a vague smile.

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“We thought that everything would be fine; no problems, no worries, our mums and dads would stop `aving a go at us. No chance! We were told what we should wear, told what we should say, what we should play on stage. All that old crap, yer know.”
After “Matchstick Men” the States forgot about Quo. So did England, well almost. The next single flopped. Things looked bad. The third one sold well, the fourth flopped. “We really got into a rut. Our producer had a strange urge to put strings on every track we cut.” Another single bombed.
Suddenly they got hold of a song they really liked, “Down The Dustpipe”. They got themselves back in the charts.
“We found ourselves in a situation that if we played a spot on television the night before we would pack out a gig, but things would die off towards the end of the week. There were usually 20 or 30 kids upfront screaming and trying to get hold of us while the rest of the hall was silent. The blokes would be there to get women and the women were there to get men. There was no satisfaction. We`d come off and there`d be nuffing; a couple of people would clap, that`s all. They wouldn`t know what you`d done and didn`t care either.”
So they decided to make a break. Instead of playing ballrooms and dance-halls, they started playing small clubs for either nothing or just expenses. They had another single success, with a song culled from an album. One album later they waved goodbye to a recording company they had grown to hate.
It took a year of court-cases and lawsuits to free themselves before joining a new, more sympathetic company. With the experience under their belts they recorded “Piledriver”.
“We put out “Paper Plane” from that album and everything went WHAM!” said Rossi leaning across the table. “Everything just bust wide open. Since then we`d have four smash singles on the trot in England.”
With Quo`s astonishing success, the old company jumped on the band-wagon, releasing tracks from old albums as singles and putting out their own, unapproved compilation albums.

“We had “Paper Plane”, our own single in the charts there were two singles from the other company; the “Piledriver” and the new “Hello” albums were in the album charts while the other company`s “Best Of…” and Golden Hour Of…” sets were high-flying. We were trying to keep a steady flow of material and there was this other lot flooding the shop with singles and albums. It was ridiculous.”
Since then Quo have had their new “Quo” album released in England along with the single, “Break The Rules”. The single was top ten. The album?
“We knew the album would do well,” declared Rossi draining the last of his 7 Up from the bottle. “We knew it would. But it turned out to be incredible. The first week of its release it went into the charts at number two. From then it fought it out with the Carpenters and Rick Wakeman! It`s amazing.”
Why come over to the States to start again from the bottom? Surely the last album will make enough money to keep them in plenty for a year?
“You can`t stop. You just can`t say that`s enough. We could stay in England and work away, turning out album after album and saturate things. We don`t want to do that.
“You have to come over to the States; it`s a natural thing to do. Richard said the other day `when you are in a race and you are half-a-mile in front of everybody else, you don`t stop, you keep going`. That`s what we are doing.”
What`s happening after this six-week trip, I enquired.
“We go home and try to get some things down for the new album which should be out early next year. Then we`ve got four days off, off to Sweden, Denmark and Norway then come back over here again in October,” answered Rossi.
Back to the States again? Four tours in 18 months?
“I think so. If we are really going to make a go of the States I want to do it now, not spread it over five years, coz we`ll be a bit old by then. We`ll all be 21,” he smiled with a twinkle in his eye.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Marley, Billy Preston, Ronnie Lane, Golden Earring, Ronnie Spector, Duane Eddy, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Andy Fairweather Low, Viola Wills, Mick Jagger, Suzi Quatro, R. Dean Taylor, Johnny Bristol, Julie Driscoll, Argent, Georgia Fame, Vangelis, Greenslade.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Status Quo FROM SOUNDS, January 26, 1974

The album Mr. Makowski was lucky enough to hear a little of in its initial stages was later to be named “Quo”. It was released in early May the same year. Contrary to their previous album “Hello!” who went to the top spot in the charts, this one “only” achieved a number 2 spot.
Have a nice read.

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Quo: and now for something completely different

Pete Makowski listens to the album and gets a surprise

KA-CHUNK, ka-chunk, ka-chunk, ka-chunk, Quo are back! And for people who think that the band have run dry out of riffs, be warned, they`re going to be around for a lot longer than you think.
Francis Rossi and John Coghlan were in good spirits considering the unearthly hour of morning the interview was set, at IBC`s studios. But like their music the band`s schedule is so tight that this was the only opportunity available to speak to them.
Right now they`re laying down as many tracks as possible before commencing a series of long and arduous tours all over the world, including Scandinavia, Australia, Japan and America.
Something which proved to be a hindrance to the progression of their new LP was the people in the neighbouring buildings were complaining about the noise from the studio, restricting their recording sessions no later than early evening.
Francis and John sat behind a complex piece of recording equipment festooned with knobs and slide switches. “I know what that one`s for, said John pointing at the headphone socket.
The last time I spoke to the band, they had just completed their first American tour which they described as a nerve-racking ordeal but fruitful at the same time.
“I was like a spoilt brat last time, I wanted to come home all the time,” explained Francis, and John agreed. “Some of the gigs were so small, like the Whisky”, Francis continued, “there`d be a couple of tables and chairs and a bit of dance floor and I thought `fuck me, so this is the Whisky, this is what everyone`s talking about.”
“You got no room, you can`t fart in there, let alone play your tunes,” John put it down to the difficulty of adapting their act to club level and they had the audience when they played the Santa Monica Civic, a larger venue.

“We ripped the place apart, and we got good reports although we weren`t totally satisfied with the show ourselves.
“This time we`ll be totally prepared.”
They both think they`ll be prepared this time and Francis put it down to the state of mind you`re in when you go there. “Last time we didn`t know what to expect, we built ourselves to such a peak and then we realised it was back to the clubs again.
“There was friction in the band, I suppose because we`ve been playing clubs most of our life we didn`t want to go through it all again.
“We were dreading the prospect of going back again,” interrupted John, “but now we`re quite looking forward to it.”
Although they can be described as mammoth in this country the group still worry about the sustain of their success and want to add more followers to the surging ranks of Quolites.
“We love doing Britain,” said John, “and it`s no secret that the kids hold the same kind of affection for the band”. When I saw Quo, at their first Rainbow gig, the reaction was frightening, there wasn`t one still limb in the whole building.
One of the band`s basic traits is their solid touring and I asked Francis if the band were at their most creative under this type of pressure? “Yeah, but John doesn`t like it, do ya?”. “No,” he affirmed, “I don`t mind if we`ve got some ideas and were under pressure, but it`s chaotic and there are no ideas.”
John doesn`t think that they`ll finish their new album before they go on a Scandinavian tour next week and thinks they`ll probably record some tracks on their States tour the following week, which should prove to be an interesting experiment.
They both believe that this album is a definite progression to “Hello”, “It`s keyed more to stereo than our previous records,” John continued, “they were more mono before but this one got things like guitars answering each other and things like that.”

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At this point Ritchie Parfitt and Alan Lancaster entered and they decided to go down to the studio. The amps were on and as soon as the band were assembled they breezed into a jam. There were screens around Alan, and amps were resting on seats. So were the boys. It was a very relaxing picture Rossi smoking a Players No. 6 and playing, a complete contrast to what they`d be laying down later on in the day.
As soon as the roadies arrived with food, the music stopped and they returned to the booth. It was decided that I should hear some rough mixes of three tracks they`d already completed.
They stunned me when I heard them. I never knew Status were technically capable of such quality. I`ve always liked them for their simply raunchy sound but this was amazing!
The album will probably be quite a revelation to people who don`t like Quo and be accepted by their fans who must regard it as a progression. Ritchie thinks that this album will bring out the individual personalities of the group.
Although the mix was rough the production was crisp, and each instrument well balanced. The guitars are sharper and more cutting, the bass, meatier and the thick slabs of Alan Lancaster`s drumming proves he is the vehicle which carries Quo`s music.
One thing that may surprise a lot of people is that some of the stuff was very – wait for it… funky, also brought about by the presence of Alan`s drumming. The numbers are very well arranged, not overdone to the point of sterility and left a lot of space for the boys to rock.
They also played a quiet track, very melodic and imaginative and have obviously set out to make a winner and as far as I`m concerned with what I`ve heard they`ve succeeded.
As Francis said earlier on, “We`re tired of people criticising us because of our sound, so we wanted to do something different.” They have no single planned which doesn`t really concern them, but there`s no doubt they`ll be gigging all year round and they hope to break in a few new countries.
So ladies and gentlemen, now for something completely different.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Dylan, Marc Bolan, Ralph McTell, Incredible String Band, Kiki Dee, Carl Palmer, Jethro Tull, Pointer Sisters.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Status Quo FROM SOUNDS, October 13, 1973

A very good and honest interview with Richard Parfitt and Alan Lancaster from what was still an early stage of their career. I really liked this article written by the great Pete Makowski. Enjoy.

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Three phases of Quo

By Pete Makowski

“If you take a look at how many bands were around when we started, how many of them are around now?” This thought provoking question was put forth by Status Quo`s bass guitarist Alan Lancaster and rhythm guitarist Richard Parfitt, and it`s true… how many bands are there in existence who have survived the Jimi Hendrix, Walker Brothers and Englebert Humperdinck package tour era?
Only Quo can boast coming out comparatively unscathed, and they endured a tough ride going through the youth club scene, reaching the highest of highs and the lowest of lows three times still to return in fighting form.
The three phases of Quo began when they made national success with “Pictures Of Matchstick Men”. Remember a pubescent Francis Rossi adorned in that trendy mod gear blasting hell out of those four notes? Then the hair grew longer, the whiskers sprouted and the music got grittier and they made a return to the charts with “In My Chair”, which showed the beginnings of their present day boogie style with those monotone vocals from Mr. Rossi which is still a well known trait for the bands newer material. And now Quo are back stronger than ever, they made their return with a very impressive “Piledriver” and followed that up with an even better “Hello.”

BUTLINS

It was a nice surprise to find the interview was going to be conducted with Richie and Alan because I was expecting to be confronted with Francis and it`s nice to hear what the rest of the boys think. Richard the blond haired bombshell, whose looks have probably left a few damp seats at their gigs, reflected back to those hard times when the band played residences at Butlins and such like places.
“We were green then,” he explained with a bold cockney accent, “we were being conned left, right and centre, we know now, but we had to learn the hard way, which is probably the best way to do it.”
The band have recently returned from an American tour which they were extremely pleased with, not expecting half the reaction they received, and when they weren`t being subjected to strenuous tours they were putting finishing touches to their recently released album leaving a blank period between “Piledriver” and “Hello” meanwhile, Pye, their former record company, rereleased some of their old singles which sold quite a few copies. I wondered if the band felt this harmed them in any way.

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CREDIT

“Obviously we were pissed off, `cause we walked out on them and we want the kids to listen to the new stuff but I must credit them on the singles they chose, they were obviously thinking before they released it.”
“Piledriver”, the album which gave Quo a new lease of life, was a very rugged rock album and a good introductory to what the band were about and like their follow-up they displayed the writing talents of the rest of the band. I asked Richie if he felt “Hello” displayed any state of progression within the band.
“Definitely, we wouldn`t have released it if we felt it wasn`t, it still maintains that Quo feel but it`s more melodic and it`s more the band.” This leads to the question of Mr. Rossi`s position in the band, from live gigs it seems he`s the congenial spokesman, but Richie hastily points out that the vocalist is always the focal point – fair enough – but do the band ever feel repressed in any way?
“No, never, if we felt Francis was taking over we`d pack up tomorrow, but we all have a part in arranging, producing and writing, we`re a family – which may sound corny – but we don`t look at each other as members, it`s a way of life. I can`t imagine what life would be like without Status Quo, I love the band, I love doing what I`m doing, I`m not saying it`s everything I want from life, I don`t want to get heavy about that, but as far as I`m concerned I wouldn`t want to be with any other band.”
But surely if the band plan to be permanently together they would have to eventually change their musical policy? “We`ve all got musical tastes which we`re into and I think that they`ll come out eventually,” said Rick, “but it can only change naturally if it`s not natural we won`t do it,” interjected Alan, the mustachiod brass player. “We`ve found a direction,” continued Rick, “a musical direction we follow but we don`t know where it`s going to yet.”
So Quo are planning to become permanent fixtures but with such a hectic past don`t they have a fear of being abandoned again? “Christ yeah,” exclaimed Rick, “but only from time to time we think `what if it happens again` but the way things are going it looks as if we`ll be here for a long time.”
Do they feel indebted to their loyal followers? “We`re not aiming to be pop stars,” explained Alan, “the first thing we think about is our audience and everything we do we think will they like it? and what`s it going to be like on stage?” Richie continued, “When I sit at home and write a song I try to imagine what it`s like on stage, we do it for the audience and, of course for self satisfaction, you come off stage sometimes and if you haven`t played well you don`t get that warm feeling but when you`ve gone down a storm that`s when you get that feeling.

RESPECT

“We`ve been going a long time and have probably worked harder than any other band,” Alan said, “the amount of work we`ve done and the amount of years we`ve been going we should be rich, `cause we`ve had quite a few record successes as well, most of the money has been put back for things to help us get the sound across. I`m not saying we`re not in it for the money, we are as well, but if we were money grabbers we`d take it and spend all of it.”
Because of their years of hard toil Quo command a high degree of respect and can be credited to the recent rock`n`roll boom, do they feel themselves to be innovaters in any way? “Well, it`ll probably sound conceited,” said Richie blushingly, “but we are aware of that, we do have our own sound you know that.”
With their new album riding high in the charts it looks as if they are going to reach even greater heights but when will they completely lose their insecurity and realise they`ve reached their zenith. Richie pondered for a moment and then expounded. “When we break in the States, if we break there then we can begin to relax a bit more and then the rest of the world! England`s going fairly well but we`ve been playing here for six years so how long is it going to take for the rest of the world?”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Dave Mattacks, David Crosby, The JSD Band, Phil Manzanera, Geordie, Jerry Shirley, Sutherland Bros. and Quiver, Jo Jo Gunne, Allan Taylor.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.