Steve Peacock

ARTICLE ABOUT Slade FROM SOUNDS, May 10, 1975

Now, this was a fun and very well-written article. Should be of interest to all, but of course the Slade fans will salivate over this. People today just don`t seem to realise how huge this band were in the 70s and part of the 80s. Very influential for other artists both in Europe, but also in the US. This article takes you back to when it happened and you can almost smell the concert hall (and the soiled underwear).
Read on!

IMG_2853

Cum on, feel the boyz!!!

By Steve Peacock

Good grief, it`s hot in here. Here is the Colston Hall, Bristol. Here is a Slade concert. Here they have just completed the opening volley of their set. Here we go again.
“It`s really nice,” shouts Noddy Holder into the microphone as the last echoes of `Monkeys Can`t Swing` dies away. “It`s really gryte to be back in Bristol again.”
RAAAAAH!!!!!!
“And now we`re going to do one, going to do one called `THE BANG-GING MAN`…”
RAAAAH!!!!!
And off they jolly well go, pounding along on the crest of a very hard, deliberate riff, Noddy screaming the vocal and chunking out chords, Dave Hill adding accents and frills and prancing, Don Powell bashing away in a kind of reflex action, and Jim Lea doing the funky strut with his bass on the opposite flank. `Bangin` Man` stamps the Heavy Metal seal of approval on Slade.
Lights are strung all around the stage, with spots around the hall as well. Lighting plans are quite detailed, but the effects simple, giving you a kind of bright, slightly glitzy quality of a well designed TV variety show lighting set. Costumes are tailored to suit group images. Dave is in a black tailcoat, waistcoat and rolled up trousers, all studded with metal reflectors; Don is workmanlike in dungarees: Jim is in white satin; and Nod – a suit in red and yellow, with huge polka dots and a mile-wide tie that stretches to mid calf.
Third number up is `Gudbuy T`Jane`: “We`re doing all the ones you know,” bawls Noddy afterwards, “all the ones you know, so everyone gets sweaty and your knickers start sticking to you.”
RAAAAAH!!!!!
“Now, we`re going to do one from the film now…”
RAAAAH!!!
“Did anybody go out to see the film?”
YEAH!!!!!
“Good, good. Now… me and James here…”
RAAAAH!!!
“We`re really good friends really…”

Over a cup of breakfast in the Bristol Holiday Inn at noon next day, Jimmy Lea says it`s strange, but everywhere they go these days people seem to think he and Nod fight and hate each other just like Stoker and Paul do in the film of `Flame`. He says they never expected Slade fans to believe that `Flame` was the story of Slade, but they did. That`s why they make a stage announcement every night.
It`s hardly surprising that Nod, Jim, Dave and Don are closely identified with their film parts Stoker, Paul, Barry and Charlie: the director and scriptwriter spent weeks hanging around with them on the American tour and drew the screen characters, speech patterns and much group atmosphere from what they observed. A lot of the situations came from stories the group told.
So if Flame isn`t Slade, it was based on… a caricature. And if the plot never happened it was based on… a collage. But Nod loves Jim really, and he says so every night in front of a hall full of witnesses. And Jim isn`t leaving because of musical differences – not now they`re back on the road.
It was really strange when they`d finished filming, Jim says, they got so into the parts that they were beginning to live them, beginning to behave like the characters they played. It`d been their first break from the usual grind of recording and touring for several years, and that in itself was a slightly unnerving experience. “Afterwards,” said Jim. “I just didn`t want to go back to fucking Slade.” It passed of course. Paul let go his hold on Jim and Slade survived.
Noddy confirmed there had been seepage: “For the seven weeks of the film you`d be playing those people all day and you`d get back to the hotel and still be acting the same way. Jim was the most uptight about the actual film and he took it the most seriously, whereas I didn`t take it that seriously at all, I just went and did it.”
But it touched raw nerves? “Oh yea, of course it did. That was the whole point of making the film, was to show that we`re `uman, that groups are `uman. It may not be how we act off stage, but it`s how a lot of groups act… I mean we have rows, but not to the extent that would make the group split up. All the groups who came to the premiere said “that could have been us”. They recognised theirselves in those situations”.

It`s getting hotter in the Colston Hall as Slade move into `Far Far Away`: it`s one of the quieter numbers in the set, but even so a mother with two small children beats her retreat. One of the kids is in Cub`s uniform.
“We`re going to do our new record now,” bellows Nod.
RAAAAH!!!!
“We took it to the BBC and they banned it…”
BOOOOO!!!!
“Because they said it had… dirty words in it…”
RAAAH!!!!!!!
“So I went back last week and put new words on it…”
BOOOO!!!!!!
“But tonight – ”
RAAAH!!!!!!!
He needn`t have finished the sentence, but he did anyway. Tonight they would hear the uncensored version. The `ban` happened when they gave the first play of their new single – `Thanks For The Memory` – to Emperor Rosko, whose producer asked the bosses for clearance on the line “love smell on your sheets”.
The BBC decided this wasn`t quite the sort of thing Rosko`s listeners should hear, but apparently they are happy about the substitution line.
Which is: “Honey on your meat.”
Ahem.

We`re back in the Colston Hall, and the temperature`s rising. The lights go down, a spotlight hits the Victor Sylvester Ball above the stage, casting iridescent dandruff all over the hall, and Jim starts into the piano intro to `How Does it Feel`.
The heat is getting to the group on stage. Don, in particular is feeling it.
“We`re going to do one now, going to do one now…” Nod is getting ready to stir them again… “featuring David this time, featuring David…”
RAAAH!!!!!
“Featuring David…”
RAAH!!!!!
The dispassionate observer begins to notice that something which should have happened, hasn`t happened. Nod steps forward again and begins to frame the letter `f` – ahah, the cue must be `featuring David`. He gives up and turns round to Don, who looks slightly dazed at the drumstool.
“Oi”.
Don jerks into action with a fast 4/4 figure featuring hi-hat, and the band rolls into `Little Bit Of Your Love`. The finale sees Dave up on a pedestal to one side of the stage (Jim has one too) with a spotlight on him and a searchlight behind him playing solo, feedbacky guitar a la Hendrix `Star Spangled Banner` except that… oh, never mind.
As that reverberates, Nod steps into a red spot, strumming guitar, and goes into `Everyday`, the out-and-out melody spot. When he gets to the “And you know…” line he urges the audience to join in, and they take over. It`s SingalongaNod, and it sounds a bit like a crowd scene from `Oliver`, but it`s also a very moving section of the show.
“Right! We`re going to feature David again n-….”
A frantic 4/4 featuring hi-hat drowns out the inevitable RAAAAH!!!!

IMG_2911

Nod turns round: “Quiet you… Oi! It`s called, it`s called `OK, Yesterday Was Yesterday` yay.”
RAAAH!!!! Bring on the powerchords.
“And now, and now… Jesus Christ it`s hot in here…” but Nod`s not wilting. “I tell you what, I want all the girls, all the girls, to take their knickers off…”
OOOOOOOOOOO!!!!
“… and I want all the fellas, all the fellas, to take their trousers off…”
RAAAH!!!!
“And then we can, then we can all lose our… lose our INHIBITIONS!!!”
RAAAHH!!!!!!!!!!
“This one, this one is a brand new one. It`s the B-side of our new single, the backside of our new single, and it`s called… `IT`S RAINING DOWN IN MY CHAMPA-A-A-A-AGNE`”.
RAAAAAH!!!!
The tune (which some of the group and entourage favour as the A-side of the single) is a perfect stage number, allowing them to introduce a touch of stiff bluebeat and a chorus or two of `The Banana Boat Song` before we come back to Nod.
“This next one, this next one features Don.” He turns to the drummer who holds aloft a giant inflatable packet of Wrigley`s chewing gum. “He brought along some of his favourite food…”
RAAAAH!!!!
“… because he doesn`t eat anything else.”
RAH!!
Nod begins to hum the theme tune from the adverts, singing: “stick it up your bum, bum, bum, stick it up your bum, bum, bum”, which inevitably is taken up by the audience. The band kick straight into a long, raving `Let The Good Times Roll`, featuring a drums / bass duet, and a drums / solo passage with Nod yelling “keep me rolling” over the top. And then it`s finale time.

“We`re going to do one now… is everybody upstairs crazee?”
YEAH!!!!!!!
“And is everybody downstairs crazee?”
YEAH!!!!!!!
You`ll never guess which song they`re finishing up with.
“Right. Mama, we`re all crazee now… ”
“RAAAAHH!!!!!!!
Naturally enough, the number ends with a storm of applause. For a couple of minutes after the band has left the stage, the audience set up a chant of We Want Slade… and they get `em. The cheers go up as they return, and even the appearance of Nod`s stovepipe hat (with mirrors) gets a special cheer. Nod teases the crowd, calling for supporters of Bristol Rovers (RAH!!) and then Bristol City (RAAAAAYY!!!!), before he leads the congregation in a rendition of `You`ll Never Walk Alone`, as they sway in unison, hands in the air.
“Louder,” yells Nod. Louder sang the crowd. The band did `Get Down And Get With It` as the encore and the theatre stamped along. But by the end they were exhausted, limp rags. Cheers for a second encore weren`t too convincing and the houselights soon went up. But Slade have never inspired their audience to second and third encores – the energy level is so high everyone is drained.
An average gig? Pretty much, says Jim, and assistant manager John Steel puts it this way: “I`ve never seen them do a bad gig. They`re pros.” Which must make it hard for them to do better than a good, professional show. The previous weekend`s gig in Birmingham had been what Nod called one of their best gigs ever, and that was a relief to them, because when they laid off to do the film they realised that towards the end of the gigs before then they`d been getting stale.
“We realised that at certain points we were working to format, which we`d never intended to do. Then just before Christmas we went on a six-week tour of Europe, and we hadn`t played live for five months or more, which is the longest lay-off we`ve ever had – even when Don had his car crash we weren`t off that long. Our first gig was in Iceland, and it wasn`t perfect by any means, but we got a complete new vitality. Something completely new was there. It was the best European tour we`ve ever done.”

Driving back from the gig to the Holiday Inn, personal roadie Graham Swinnerton glides the Rolls right past the front door.
“Swin, you`ve gone past it.”
“I have,” says Swin, “an arrangement with the security people.”
“But there wasn`t anyone around at the front door.”
We get round the back, and a bunch of fans converges. Perhaps they too had an arrangement with the security people.
Next day, the tour hits Southampton, and the group leaves at midday to get there in time to record a spot for Southern Television in the afternoon. It`s for a kids` programme compered by Mike `Ugly Duckling` Reid (who is not there). Nod, at the suggestion of producer Colin Nutley, interviews the band. “Today in the studio we have as our special guests the Slades pop combo, weddings and parties catered for, funerals a speciality… “… now Mr. Hill, I see you have a smart suit there, the only trouble is I see you ain`t got no taste…”
This British tour was arranged more or less at the last minute. They hadn`t intended to do any dates before going to America, but then they realised that it would be ages before they could do another one. They have to stay out of Britain for a while to avoid paying heavy taxes, and anyway they feel it`s time to crack America. Nod feels they haven`t concentrated enough there, which is why they haven`t had the record sales success they feel sure could be theirs if they made a determined effort.
Their lack of attack on America has been deliberate strategy for the past year because they`re trying to let the promotion Polydor gave them fade from people`s memories. “They tried to build us up like we were the biggest thing since the Beatles…” Nod says. “That`s what killed Bolan over there.” They`re now with Warners, and the strategy is to build on the live reputation they`ve already established and plug away in the States until the momentum rolls a record into the chart and keeps it there. They`re confident.

Opening the show to a Slade audience must be a nerve-wracking job, but Bunny had been pleasantly surprised on the first few dates. They`d gone down quite well, and fears that they`d get boos and catcalls had been groundless. At Southampton Gaumont their luck changed.
It had been going OK – Kenny Parry, guitar, Dave Dover, bass and Terry McCuster, drums had been playing hard and tight, and Linda Millington was out front, singing strong and rabble rousing with feeling. She`d done a good (and courageous) version of `Piece Of My Heart`, and the band struck up the intro to `With A Little Help From My Friends`, a la Grease Band. It went on just that bit too long, and the natives got restless. When Linda sung the line: “Would you stand up and walk out on me?” there was a clearly audible:
YEAH!!!!!!!
It`s a fairly good natured crowd, and the barracking is as much in the manner of a jest as it is anything else. It is nonetheless upsetting for Bunny. Their time, no doubt, will come.
Slade`s set at Southampton is pretty much the same as it was in Bristol, except for the addition of `Standing On The Corner`, the switching around of `Get Down` and `Crazee`, and bringing forward the football singalong to the spot after `Everyday`. As John Steel muttered during `You`ll Never Walk Alone`: “fucking good job Noddy didn`t decide to go into politics.”
Promoter Mel Bush came up to me while I was watching the set from the back of the theatre. “Have you ever looked out from the back of the stage while Noddy`s talking to the audience? It`s something I only ever see with this group, and that`s that every pair of eyes is turned towards Nod. Not 90 per cent, but every one. The communication Nod has with those kids is… unique. The kids identify with him – he`s not the most good looking guy in the world, he`s not the ugliest, it`s like there`s one of them up there and he`s talking their language. He`s not talking down to them, he`s talking to them.”
“Somehow when we come to Southampton,” says Nod (he`s already said that it`s gryte to be back in the town), someone always brings a bottle of Scotch to the dressing room, and we seem to drink it. So if you see a wet patch on my trousers you`ll know what it is, because I haven`t got time to go off…”
RAAAH!!!!
“But if the roadies bring me a bucket I might give you a quick flash later…”
RAAAAHHH!!!!!!!!!!!
Towards the end of the set, a pair of knickers lands at Jim Lea`s feet. He picks them up and holds them to show the kids they`ve got SLADE written across them.
“Smell `em,” said Nod.

IMG_2912

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!
This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Back Street Crawler, Mallard, Leo Sayer, Mud, Jet, Average White Band, Al Green, Ray Charles, Chinn and Chapman, Hawkwind, Slade, Genesis, Dr. Hook, Helen Reddy, Alex Harvey, Bachman Turner Overdrive, Bill Munroe, Kraftwerk, Kinks.
The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Pink Floyd FROM SOUNDS, November 9, 1974

A really nice preview of the show that Pink Floyd were about to unveil on the world. What a lucky man Mr. Peacock was, to be able to see this in its early stages from the front row. Read on!

IMG_2513

The moon in… November

As the Pink Floyd set off on their British tour, Steve Peacock sneaks behind the scenes for a preview and predicts yet another triumph.

Have you ever wondered what Pink Floyd would sound like when they`re just jamming around – warming up while technicians fiddle with the PA system?
It`s somewhere between Booker T and the MGs and the Who – at least that`s the way they sounded in the early part of Friday afternoon at Elstree. The start of their British tour was just more than three days away, and in one of the big hangar-like buildings at the studios, it was last-chance day for the Floyd and their tour crew.
Quite honestly, it amazes me how a band like the Floyd ever gets on the road: Arthur Max – the `big chief` of the road crew – must have nerves of steel and a quad brain to co-ordinate the sound, the lights, the films, the people… and inevitably, Friday brought its share of teething problems. Equally inevitably, It Will Be All Right On The Night.
The Floyd have long had an enviable reputation for sound quality on tour, and this time – as Nick Mason explained – they have new refinements to the PA which they hope will advance that reputation one stage on. From Friday`s evidence, I`d say that will be the case.
In other ways too, this tour looks like pushing forward the Pink Floyd`s reputation – as a band. The first half of the programme will be entirely new stuff – 45 minutes or so, which divides roughly into three pieces: “Shine On You Crazy Diamond”, “Raving and Drooling”, and “Gotta Be Crazy”. Roger Waters` new lyrics for these songs are among the best he`s written – still with the barbed directness of his “Dark Side Of The Moon” words, but with subtler, and consequently greater, effect.

“Gotta Be Crazy” is perhaps the strongest, lyrically – a kind of catechism of traps and pitfalls – and the music fits it perfectly: it alternates between angry, fast, chopping sections with Dave Gilmour playing fast, savage chord parts and slow, almost sombre sections led by Roger`s bass parts. Dave Gilmour and Rick Wright have excellent solo breaks, and towards the end there`s a section where they make the best use they ever have of the group`s voice power, with Roger singing the lead lines and Dave and Rick echoing.
The second half is “Dark Side Of The Moon”, with the new tricks and jerks. Earlier this year the Floyd tried “Dark Side” with film during a French tour and decided the idea was sound: during the Summer they worked out new pieces of film and they`ll use these for the first time on the British tour.
The screen is like a giant bass-drum skin which stands centre-stage behind the band, with the film back-projected. As the heart beat starts, a moon appears on the screen, growing bigger and bigger until it fills the whole area and disappears, to be followed by a moving development of the sound wave pattern that runs across the centre-fold of the album cover.

IMG_2530

DAZZLING

The second, and most outstanding film sequence, comes during “On The Run” and leads into “Time”. It starts with lights – street lights, car lights, flashing lights on top of police cars, airport and aircraft lights… a bewildering, dazzling succession. You then move through a kind of cloud tunnel towards a planet and just as the camera gets close to the surface the film switches to animation, skimming over the planet surface, over cities, between high buildings: it`s inter-cut with various scenes of urban destruction.
To introduce “Time” there`s a fantastic clock sequence which ends up with an avenue of swining pendula. Tick, tick, tick, tick… “Ticking away the moments…”

VOYAGER

Written down it looks somewhat literal and corny but the film and the music combined is anything but corny. “Great Gig In The Sky” is accompanied by some of the underwater shots from the “Crystal Voyager” movie which uses “Echoes” in its soundtrack. Venetta Field and Carlena Williams sing the “Great Gig” part, and Dick Parry again plays sax.
“Money” has an appropriate film section, with some neat contrasts between actual notes and coins and the people who use them – or can`t get enough. And later there`s another excellent piece of staging. As they come to the end of “Brain Damage”, Roger sings “There`s someone in my head and it`s not me”, which cues in film of various politicians. The effect is frightening.
That`s the show – the new stuff, and the new “Dark Side”, which is obviously much changed as a production, but also quite heavily amended as a piece of music. The girls are used more, and more effectively, and… well, new tricks and jerks. There will be no oldies.
Oh – a word about the programme. Doubtless you will be assailed outside the hall by people trying to flog you two-colour reproductions of old Press cuttings and all the other garbage that gets touted as “special Pink Floyd souvenirs”. You are of course welcome to consume as much as you wish, but I suspect you`ll find it worth waiting for the official programme, on sale inside the hall: it`s in the form of a comic, with our heroes in various strip exploits, plus a remarkable cartoon by Gerald Scarfe, lifelines, a quiz, and the words to the three new songs.
Accept no substitute.

IMG_2532

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ken Boothe, Van Morrison, Pete Brown, George Harrison, Roger Glover, David Puttnam, Mott The Hoople, Bad Company, Phil Spector, Thin Lizzy, Janis Ian, Elton John.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Suzi Quatro FROM SOUNDS, August 10, 1974

When you think of rock in the early 70s, it is impossible not to think of little Suzi. She, along with some hit songs delivered by the mighty songwriting duo Chinn and Chapman, made real impact into the charts of that time and a lot of those songs are great to listen to even today.

IMG_2314

Going along with the crowd

Interview by Steve Peacock

Self-assured? She seems it. Arrogant? Sometimes. Complacent? She seems it. Together? Apparently so. Successful? What do you think?
Suzi Quatro has, in her own words, carved out her niche as a hit act and it`s giving her plenty of work and plenty of hits. That`s what she wanted, and what she`s doing now is keeping on keeping on: “After the initial rush of getting to number one with “Can The Can” – and I waited ten years for that – getting better is the rush now. Writing a better song, doing a better record, doing a better show…”
And getting a hit in her homeland. While we were talking, someone came in to tell her the new single was 74 with a bullet over there. “Just cut that out and send it to my sisters, will you?” When we`d finished talking she was still thinking about it. “74 with a bullet… hey, that`s great.”
Ten years ago Suzi Quatro started her career in America, in all girl groups. After six or so years Mickie Most asked her to come over here to record, it took them a while to sort out what they were going to do, and then… “Can The Can”. Hits have given her work, and work is what she`s doing. She`s just come back from Germany, America and Australia, next week she`s off again to Italy, America, Scandinavia, Japan, Australia, Germany, Britain – and then it`s Christmas.
When she first came over: “I was getting to know what I was all about and Mickey was getting to know what I was all about, so it took time. I had a lot of growing up to do. You`re in your own environment, and you think you`re great, then someone takes you out of your environment and you find you haven`t got any legs any more. Your lose the silly ego and just keep the stuff that really means something. You learn that just because you`re American doesn`t mean you`re any better than anybody else. America`s so different from anywhere else, and now that I`m away I can see why it is so different. We grow up very fast there. You either love America or you hate it: I think now it`s the greatest place in the world to play music, but I live here. If the taxman`s all right.”

The all-girl band thing… “It didn`t ever make any difference to me whether I played with boys or girls, then when I got this band I realised that I get along one hundred percent better with men musicians.”
It always seemed just as silly to me to insist as dogma on having all women and all men: the only possible reason being gimmick. “It is, but when we first started, we just wanted to prove something. People are telling you all the time you can`t do something so you get a bunch of strong-headed girls and they go right ahead and do it. Then when you get a little bit older you see it doesn`t make any difference.”
From relatively nowhere to number one: did she and Mickey have a Masterplan? “We`ve had one major plan that`s stuck right through our association, which was he said he liked something in me that was a natural thing and I said great, don`t ever change it, and he said he`d never change it and that was our thing. A man that`s smart enough to see the natural talent instead of trying to create something… that`s what`s so great about Mickey. He directed me and brought out what he saw as important things, but they were… well, what I am I suppose.
“I always used to wear, well not the leather jeans because I couldn`t afford it, but a leather jacket. I haven`t changed – a little bit sleeker maybe, but that`s what you do when you make it, don`t you? You dress up a little bit more. If you`re just walking about the streets they`re not paying to see you walk about the streets, if you  do a show they want to see a little bit more.”
And material? Hits from the Chinnichap factory? “We were having a really hard time trying to write a hit single. We asked Nicky and Mike to write us a song, and they came down and listened to everything we`d done, went away and came back with “Can The Can”, which I still think is one of our best ones. It worked well, they do our singles. I don`t know what they`re like with their other acts, but Mickey – because he`s got a personal interest in this act – would never let anything go out that was more a Chinnichap song then a Suzi Quatro song. The two singles I thought weren`t really us were the two that didn`t make it so much, which just goes to show that if it ain`t us it ain`t gonna make it. People aren`t as stupid as journalists say they are – very few phoney songs get up there. I think the public know a true song when they hear it.”

IMG_2320

A niche: she says she`s found that, and that she won`t put out some things she`s recorded because they`re too far ahead for her audience. “When you`re on the road you progress so fast that if you put out a track – like “Angel Flight” which is 10 1/2 minutes long with strings and all – everybody would be so confused. There`s a danger of progressing too far ahead in too short a time.”
Talk about journalists insulting people – how does Suzi Quatro know that a 10-minute track with strings is too far ahead for her public? “No, the kids are buying you because you put out something that they like, you got a certain sound, so because on a night on the road you might have written something ten years ahead of time, it`s not fair to put it out and confuse them. You`re living a life on the road, they`re not: they`re still at home with their record players and their radios. If I was a kid and I heard that coming from me I`d throw it down the trash can because I wouldn`t understand it. I don`t put myself above – I just live a different life, living it faster than what they`re hearing. We`re four singles and one album old to those people.
“Listen, I`ve been in the business a long time, and you`ve got to be smart enough to know… well, Mickey`s the smart one because he noticed it before we did, because you`ve still got your egos to deal with and you think whatever you do is great. He pointed out that it was too far ahead. We all listen to different kinds of music when we`re home, but when we come together on stage we play one kind of music, and that`s what we`re known for. That`s what we do.”
You don`t find it restrictive? “No. You gotta progress but you gotta do it slowly. You gotta play it cool – look at it as if you were a fan, not a musician, go along with the crowd, nothing to upset them.”

Good for a career I`m sure, but for a musician? “If I did just what a musician thinks I`d been down in a bar in Nashville somewhere singing Billie Holiday songs. And that wouldn`t get me anywhere would it? You ask any musician who`s successful, and I bet they`d tell you if it wasn`t down to that they wanted to have a successful career they`d be doing something entirely different. It`s a stupid artist that pretends they`re in it just for creativity, because it`s a job as well. Don`t you give me that peace/love bullshit.”
I wasn`t going to. But there`s a way of striking a balance. Did she find that a problem? “No I don`t. I`ve been doing this so long that I find it quite easy to look at it as a business and still keep quite happy on the creative side. If I was to die off tomorrow I`d definitely go down to some little bar and sing and get drunk every night – actually it wouldn`t be so different to what I do now, only I wouldn`t be making any money.”
She`d said earlier about roadwork, you go where your work takes you. Does she enjoy it? “I`m a nutcase about it. One day at home and I`m absolutely dying to get back on the road. I like on the road better than off the road because off the road`s boring – you get drunk or try to give yourself a false buzz somehow. Suburban ech, I hate it.”
Surely life on the road is also a false buzz. “Sure – I know it`s a fantasy but I enjoy it and I give other people enjoyment doing it. When Mick Jagger stops I`ll wait till a year after he stops and then I will. Give the next person a chance.”

IMG_2324

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Marley, Billy Preston, Ronnie Lane, Golden Earring, Ronnie Spector, Duane Eddy, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Andy Fairweather Low, Viola Wills, Mick Jagger, Argent, R. Dean Taylor, Johnny Bristol, Julie Driscoll, Status Quo, Georgia Fame, Vangelis, Greenslade.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT The Who FROM SOUNDS, May 25, 1974

Today I`m celebrating my Birthday. At my age there are no guarantees any more, so I will have myself a really nice party, get drunk and reflect on life. Here`s to another year gone by – may life treat us all good in 2019!

IMG_2132

Concert review from Charlton Athletic Football Ground

By Steve Peacock

They began at dusk when the stage lights were just beginning to have their full effect, and played on for more than two hours into a balmy summer night. Pete Townshend compared the feeling to the time they played at Woodstock, which raised a right-on or two from the people, and the Who certainly chalked up more than their share of highs as they brought Charlton to a close.
It was a long day, and I tend to suffer from sensory overload at all-day concerts anyway, so if I say that I thought the Who`s set was patchy and that they went on a bit where a spot of judicious editing wouldn`t have come amiss, you`ll have to bear my lack of stamina in mind.
Bear in mind also that Charlton was the first time out for their new “Tommy”-less and “Quadrophenia”-less set, and it seemed they didn`t quite have the measure of the pace of the new show. The shape of their set moved in rough parabolic curves (O level maths you see, can`t beat a good education) but often I felt the distance between the peaks was elongated too far: they stretched out numbers to the point where you began to suspect they were playing for time.
Also, Townshend had some problem with a guitar amp, and there was a buzz on the PA which occasioned much fist shaking from stage towards mixing desk. The PA had been crisp and clear throughout the day, but once the buzz had been eliminated there was an appreciable drop in level and clarity through the second half of the Who`s set.
That said, there`s no denying that the Who are a magnificent band, and when they were on there was no-one to touch them: Daltrey the champion mike-swinger, Townshend the acrobat (For music and presentation there isn`t a front team that comes near them – not Rod and Ronnie, not even Mick and Keith), Entwistle in flash jacket and Mr. Bassman pose, and Moon… what can you say? Yes, well don`t.

Da (rest) da da, da (rest) da da… they were off on a peak with “Can`t Explain” and “Summertime Blues”, and they finished on a peak with two versions of “My Generation” – the first one straight and heavy, the second in boogie style. When a band has that kind of repertoire from which to draw there`s no way you`re not going to get off.
Other high points for me were “Behind Blue Eyes” which came fairly early on, Entwistle`s eccentric “Boris The Spider”, “Baba O`Reilly”, “Won`t Get Fooled Again”, “Magic Bus” and “See Me, Feel Me”: it was during that song that somebody scored bonus points for event management by turning on the full glare of Charlton`s floodlights to expose a sea of thousands of waving arms, stretched out towards the stage right back across the ground and up the terrace opposite. It was a breathtaking sight.
That`s the kind of thing that can only happen at events like Charlton and that is why they`re worth any amount of hanging around getting headaches and snarling at people who tread on your feet.

IMG_2140

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Goldie Zelkowitz, Curtis Knight, Simon Alexander, Steely Dan, Chris Stainton, Ronnie Lane, Elliott Murphy, Loudon Wainwright, Tim Buckley, Steve Miller, Beach Boys, Tommy Vance, Jim Simpson, Stefan Grossman, Lynsey de Paul, Mott the Hoople, Kevin Ayers,
Dave Cousins, ELP.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Bad Company FROM SOUNDS, May 25, 1974

How I would have liked to see this band in 1974! Must have been really good! Enjoy this review instead.

IMG_2132

Concert review from Charlton Athletic Football Ground

By Steve Peacock (?) – signed P.P.

There`s a style of strutting, brash rock band that Britain – if I may say so without sounding unduly jingoistic – does extremely well. I used to love Humble Pie for it, and there have been plenty of others: Free, the Faces on a good night, Led Zeppelin, Mott the Hoople… you know the kind of thing. Musically the roots are in American music, with particular emphasis on rivvum`n`bloose, but somehow most of the American bands I`ve seen try the same kind of approach – the Doobie Brothers, for instance – go over the top. Too much playing to the gallery, not enough playing.
Anyway, Bad Company are worthy inheritors of the tradition – four fine players with unimpeachable taste in full-blooded riffs and well-timed body blows from the soloists, who have a fine sense of stage management. They strut and posture, but it never gets into the realms of the ridiculous (at least it didn`t on Saturday), giving the band on stage just the right sense of poise and occasion without toppling over into the facade of An Act.
They`re a good band, and for a band who`ve only been together a short while they`re excellent. “Palace Of The King” was a good opener, giving everyone a chance to introduce themselves against a fairly safe background, and the rest of the set seemed well-paced. Boz and Simon Kirke provide a rhythm section that never falters yet which doesn`t play safe: it was easy to forget with Free, and you`re in danger of forgetting with the new band, just how much the music relies on Kirke`s style of drumming. Don`t.
Mick Ralphs came forward with some neat solos, but I think he still has to find his full measure of confidence within the band. Paul Rodgers was singing stronger and better than ever: it is really good to hear a band with an exceptional lead singer yet which doesn`t base its whole strength around him. Somehow the fact that the pressure`s off him more than it was Free seems to give him the scope to put much more into his singing. For me the set peaked with “Rock Steady”, “Ready For Love” and “Easy On My Soul”, but the single “Can`t Get Enough” was a rousing finale. Somehow I feel – good as they were – they are only touching the edge of their potential.

IMG_2136

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Goldie Zelkowitz, Curtis Knight, Simon Alexander, Steely Dan, Chris Stainton, Ronnie Lane, Elliott Murphy, Loudon Wainwright, Tim Buckley, Steve Miller, Beach Boys, Tommy Vance, Jim Simpson, Stefan Grossman, Lynsey de Paul, Mott the Hoople, Kevin Ayers,
Dave Cousins, ELP.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.