The Who

ARTICLE ABOUT The Who FROM New Musical Express, December 24, 1966

A very early article with this band that recently released a new album. Nice to read this from so long time ago. Read on!

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Who`s for a Merry Xmas!

By Keith Altham
Who`s for a merry Christmas, then – if we are to judge by their seasonal bounce up into the NME Top Twenty this week with “Happy Jack,” the newest composition from the bizarre pen of Pete Townshend.

Looking slightly the worse for wear due to having been full of the festive “spirit” the previous night at London’s new in-club, the Bag O’ Nails, John Entwistle was not optimistic about their prospects of a No. 1 hit when I located the group at Ryemuse recording studios last Friday.
“No chance with the Seekers’ new single,” expostulated John. “We’re always beaten to the top by the dead or the half dead. Good old Jim Reeves did it on us last time, and before that it was the singing pimple, Ken Dodd!”
Mr. Entwistle was not, apparently, convinced that this is the season of goodwill toward all men!
“I’ve got a list of people to insult written down on me sock,” obliged the bug-eyed Keith Moon, rolling up his trouser-leg to select a likely candidate. He was forestalled by being recalled to the studio to tape “Please Don’t Touch” for tonight’s “Ready, Steady, Go!” Christmas edition.
We were treated to some stereo-ed cockney from Keith in the control room, as he counted the group to start with “One, two, free.” What Pete had described as “The Who’s new sound” and was, in fact, their version of a very old rock sound, echoed about the room. They were to have recorded “Rock Around The Clock” for the show, but a change of plan was evident.

Persuade

Manager Kit Lambert got RSG producer Francis Hitchens on the phone after explaining to a secretary that he just wanted a word with Francis for “the teensiest-weensiest minute” which was sufficient time for him to persuade Francis he ought to have “Please Don’t Touch” and not “Rock Around The Clock.” Which was just as well, seeing they had just recorded it!
The boys trooped back into the control room, and Pete proved informative over the origins of “Happy Jack, who lived in sand on the Isle of Man.”
“My father used to play saxophone in a band for the season on the Isle of Man when I was a kid,” said Pete. “There was no character called `Happy Jack,’ but I played on the beach a lot, and it’s just my memories of some of the weirdos who live out on the sand.”
At this point someone announced that there was a policeman in the reception complaining about someone’s car being an obstruction, so Pete strolled out and was not seen again. Which left me with that well-known pantomime team of Moon and Entwistle. What were they doing over Christmas?
“I shall buy a copy of `Mary’s Boy Child,’ stay home and pick nuts out of me cavities,” mourned John.
“I shall watch Walt Disney and buy a new copy of `The Hallelujah Chorus,’ ” breezed Mr. Moon.
“My copy’s a bit scratched,” nodded John.
Did the two jolly satirists consider Christmas too commercial now?
“I agree with whatever Paul Jones said,” announced John.
“I suppose I shall have to go out carol singing again,” moaned Keith.
Were they sorry that this was the last Christmas RSG?
“No, it was getting a drag, and anyway Cathy McGowan can always do toothpaste adverts,” said John, consolingly.
“Vicky Wickham can go into mass production,” added Keith.
“Francis Hitchens can join the Beach Boys,” capped John.

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What changes would the New Year bring for the Who? And were they concerned over the possibility the Beatles might break up?
“Not as long as there are people like us — with imagination, drive and vigour — to carry on,” John replied.
“We’re planning some shock publicity pictures of the group,” confided Keith, ” to combat those meat pix of the Beatles, and the Stones photos in drag. We’ve got a big close-up of Pete having his finger nail bent backwards, and one of a one-eared Roger standing next to a self-portrait of Van Gogh.”
There was a short departure from the script when Kit Lambert announced that he wanted all the boys to draw portraits of each other for a “Top Of The Pops” film to be directed by Michael Lyndsay Hogg.
“Isn’t he an American?” said Keith, suspiciously. “And who am I drawing?”
“Roger,” said Kit.
“Thanks,” said Keith, but looked far from festive about it.
“Who am I doing?” asked John.
“Pete,” decided Kit.
“Good — he’s easy,” affirmed John.
There followed a rather puzzling story from Keith — for no apparent reason — about how he and John sat eating a Chinese meal in a Cologne restaurant recently while co-manager Chris Stamp and Pete got beaten up. “Every time they fell down to the floor they could see us ignoring it all and eating our meal a table away,” said Keith, delightedly.

Jealous

Why were they attacked?
“I think it was because we’re just such good-looking boys, and they were jealous,” said Keith, innocently.
Finally John observed: “You know, some people have said that they preferred the flipside of the new single. Oh, sorry, that just slipped out!”
It transpired that John wrote the flipside, “I’ve Been Away,” which is “a waltz inspired by Victor Silvester,” he says.
As I left, Keith attempted to glue a sandwich to my overcoat with a tube of super-glue, but omitted to take the top off the tube! Moon is a must for the Christmas party this year!

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The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
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ARTICLE ABOUT The Who FROM Sounds, November 8, 1975

A good, honest interview the way I like it. This one should be great for anyone interested in this band.
Read on.

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The magic had begun to dwindle… but now we`re shit-hot. We`re back to the stage where we can go anywhere and do a good show.

The Who`s verdict on The Tour and The Album. By Barbara Charone

PETE TOWNSHEND has a point. A very good point. `Where do you fit in magazines where the past is the hero and the present a queen’, he wrote for Roger Daltrey to sing on ‘They Are All In Love’ from the `Who By Numbers’ album. And it’s quite a valid question.
Where do the Who fit? So The Sunday Times safely locks them away in the sixties time capsule, remnants of something that was. In one neatly constructed paragraph they dismiss Pete Townshend as a writer who exhausted his topic after three songs. Jaded disbelievers file the Who under nostalgia, bringing them out of the closet with caution, fondly thinking of them much like you’d look at an ancient family scrapbook. But why concentrate exclusively on the past when the present is just as good and the future could possibly be even better?
Some 70,000 paying customers caught the Who on their recent romp round Britain. Not one of them was an aging geriatric patient bent on reliving youthful memories.
Maybe the kid standing precariously high atop a steel beam at Wembley likes Queen. Maybe he goes to see Status Quo when they’re in town. But right now this kid is imitating every Townshend gesture down to the last guitar swoop and leap across the stage. This kid never saw them at the Marquee or the Scene Club. This kid doesn’t even own a copy of ‘My Generation’ let alone ‘Who’s Next’. But this kid almost falls off his steel beam during the ‘Tommy’ finale. That’s today. Y’see the kids are all right.
With the Who inspiration isn’t rehearsed. Neither are the mistakes. Pete Townshend’s guitar strap falls down during the `Won’t Get Fooled Again’ finale. Roger Daltrey forgets the first verse to ‘Summertime Blues’ leaving John Entwistle a vocal solo. Playing with headphones to hear the ‘Baba O’Reilly’ backing tapes, Keith Moon gives one final percussive assault just after the rest of the band have finished the song. Townshend falls over during some visual acrobatics and Daltrey laughs.

But that’s exactly what makes the Who great. There’s an ominous sense of danger that permeates every concert, that very real knowledge that chaos could break out momentarily. Equipment fails, guitars feed back, tempers flair, the band threaten to break up in the dressing room after a show, disaster lurks overhead. Take the first night of their British tour.
Six thousand pounds had been spent on risers for the equipment and the drums to give the band more room on stage, to heighten the visuals. So there’s Keith Moon playing only to himself because the rest of the band can’t hear. Six thousand pounds and they threw it all away after the show.
“I think the first gig could have blown the whole thing,” John Entwistle admits. “There was absolutely no communication. We were just playing stuff we’d memorised and hoped it fit. The risers cut the band off from each other. It’s always like that. When we haven’t been working for a long time we try to do something new. And every time we do something the whole sound just goes. The times we’ve stuck Keith on rostrums and pulled him off the next night,” John sighs.

Tolerant

“The Who is a band that’s got to hear each other. If we don’t the whole thing falls to pieces. We’ve got to be on the floor with the amps close so we can hear what we’re doing. We’re more confident now because we can actually hear each other!”
Just a few years ago the first night in Stafford could have been the beginning and the end of the tour. Then the Who could have easily locked themselves in their dressing room and battled out the problem. Now they’ve matured because they`re determined to survive.
“We’re a lot more tolerant towards each other now. There’s still flare-ups, arguments, and screaming matches. But at least now we know what makes us tick,” Entwistle slyly beamed. “Now we know we can do a good show. That second night in Stafford cured us all. We just hadn’t done a show like that for ages.”
Prior to this recent period of productivity, the Who had grown collectively disillusioned and depressed over live performances. They had lost the enthusiasm and inspiration integral to elevating a show from the routine to the sublime. Playing five concerts in June of 1974, four at New York’s Madison Square Garden and one at London’s Charlton Athletic ground, the Who despised themselves for mechanically going through onstage motions.
“I nearly walked out of the band after the Charlton show,” Entwistle recalls. “I just couldn’t take it anymore, couldn’t take the lack of enthusiasm onstage. Since `Quadrophenia’ it’s been very difficult. Pete hasn’t wanted to particularly work onstage. He felt he wasn’t giving anything. Now he feels better than he has the last five years.
“Before we all wanted to keep the band together, but now we all want to work. Concerts had become straight Who gigs. We’d come offstage and say ‘Well that’s another one gone’. We`d never say ‘that was an amazing thing you played’. There was absolutely nothing there. The magic had begun to dwindle.”
“It got to the point where it just wasn’t fun anymore,” Daltrey said, echoing Entwistle’s statements. “And if it ain’t fun why bother?”
Yet the fun was a long time coming. A disturbing lack of good times permeated strained atmospheres during the first painful weeks attempting to record what eventually became ‘The Who By Numbers’. Normally optimistic Daltrey became depressed over the recording progress.

Traumas

“It just got to the point where I began to think that maybe we had done as much as we could within our framework. I kept telling myself that wasn’t true,” he said somberly.
But that tenuous maybe held steady. The Who felt like they had exhausted their framework during the first album sessions. Part of the problem revolved around differing rates of individual growth.
“We found it very difficult to record at first,” Entwistle recalled. “We couldn’t play well together and kept falling back on oldstyle Who playing without trying to put anything new into it. In the end we just had to takea break from recording, do a rehearsal and just jam between numbers to prove we could play again. We took a mobile down to Shepperton which did us a lot of good.”
Even more despondent that the group was producer Glyn Johns who had worked with them laughed. “Who’s Next’ was time however, beginning traumas and problems seemed insurmountable.
“Glyn had to go through a lot in those early sessions,” John admits; “When you get to a session and no one turns up I imagine you get somewhat disillusioned.
“I’ve had more fun making other albums,” Glyn Johns laughed. ” ‘Who’s Next’ was made under more satisfying conditions. This was more of a challenge because the atmosphere was far from relaxed. When they first arrived in the studio they weren’t a band. When they left the studio, they were. The album speaks for itself.”
While the rehearsals proved they could still play well together, the Who almost discarded the album much to Glyn Johns, horror when they heard the final mixes. About to scrap the entire project and return to the studio to record additional tracks, the band realised the problem lay in the album running order and subsequently worked out a more rationale line-up.
“The first album order just seemed to go down and down,” Entwistle said seriously.
“But the second order was like a new album. It’s the type of album we needed after the grandeur of ‘Quadrophenia’. We needed to prove that we`d done something since ‘Tommy’ as it had been regurgitated and thrown up again. We needed another album to let people know we were playing new music.
“Personally I think the next album should be live so people will know that we`re still touring,” he laughed ahout their recent onstage holiday. “We tried to do a live version of ‘Tommy` once and maybe we could include some selections from that. We need some new onstage numbers. We can’t play ‘Summertime Blues` for the rest of our life. But by the time we tour America again in the Spring we should be able to do another live album.”
Although it won’t be included on another live album, much of the new studio album translates easily to stage. Unlike the bulk of ‘Quadrophenia’ with its complex backing tapes, the more basic material from `The Who By Numbers’ finds the group returning to their original format.
“The synthesizer was the one thing I missed,” John admits. “I could have seen it on several tracks. But Roger doesn’t like synthesizers, he thinks they’re fake. Still I like to use them to colour the songs theme.”

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In tears

Deceptively low profile on first listening, much of the new album is charged with Who aggression and emotion. Several observers have remarked that they wished Townshend had been in a more optimistic frame of mind when writing the songs. Others insist the record is not indicative of group morale and believe Townshend should have released the material as a solo album. These complaints seem equally deceptive as first listenings.
The songs are stuffed with more genuine feeling and emotion than some of the bands better known work. Underneath the disillusion, lies a promising future optimism. Either Townshend writes words the band personally identify with or the band play merely emotionally. Or both.
“In a lot of ways I feel the same as Pete,” John said. “I could really relate to ‘How Many Friends’ and so could Keith. Moony was nearly in tears when he heard that song. Still, before we did ‘Squeeze Box’ and ‘Blue, Red and Grey’ the album had a different identity. Those songs brighten the whole thing up. I was personally more restricted on this album because complicated bass parts didn’t seem to fit so I simplified a lot of it.”
In many ways the cover caricature of the group, drawn by Entwistle, neatly parallels the inside contents. When the Who are apart friction and break-up rumours circulate but when they are joined together, the combination is unbeatable.
“That cartoon of the group has been around for about eight years. The first time I ever drew cartoons was on our American tour with Herman’s Hermits,” John laughs. “Pete and I were doing a comic strip. Pete’s was the Duchess versus Plum. We used to call Roger the Duchess because of his big, floppy hat and fur coat. Bob Pridden (sound engineer) was Plum, scruffy little man. My comic strip was Dr Jekyl and Dr Noom which was Moon, a monster that chased old ladies in wheel chairs.

“When it came round to this cover the band turned to me and said it’s your turn, so I just drew the cartoon updating the clothes and appearances as they have changed. Pete’s used to have more hair and no beard. I changed his nose as well, flattened it up. Roger’s had the same hair with different clothes. Keith’s is more or less exactly the same. Mine’s different cause I drew in an extra scar.” he laughs fiendishly. “Originally I was going to have birth signs with scales but then I thought that was a bit too far but.”
Astrology would have been too cosmic for the Who verging dangerously close to Yes or the Pink Floyd. Instead they stuck to a stark cover to compliment the authentic insides. It is the brute force of the Who that comes through onstage and record whether’s it’s the gentle frustration of ‘However Much I Booze’ or the vulnerable truths of ‘Dreaming From The Waist.’
“Making that album wasn’t easy in any way at all,” Glyn Johns admitted. “Reflecting on it, the greatest thing is that the end result is very healthy. That’s worth it. The Who came out of those album sessions full steam ahead and that’s very important.”
Full steam ahead means that the Who are earning their reputation as rock’s greatest performing band. Revitalised and invigorated, they are not living off the past. They play with a vengeance because they are determined to prove their worth. Even ‘Tommy’ is being done for a reason, not to capitalise on Ken Russell’s Technicolour glory but because they enjoy playing it. The days the Who walked offstage, and said ‘Well that’s another one gone’ are thankfully over.
“Actually it was our idea to do `Tommy’ onstage again. The reason I agreed to it was because everyone expected us to drop ‘Tommy’ from the act because of the film so instead we thought we’d do more of it,” Entwistle said with amused irony.
“We’re determined not to let anything worry us and try to do perfect shows. It’s obviously very important for us to keep the Who going. But I’d like to see the solo careers continue. I missed playing with the Who during the Ox tour but that’s what allows us to bring something extra to the band when we get back together. That’s what helps us grow.

Jamming

“We haven’t played this well since the ‘Live At Leeds’/`Tommy’ era,” John said proudly. “I suppose you could say we’re shit-hot. We’re back to the stage where we can go anywhere and do a good show. Before we’d just jam at rehearsal or in the studio and it was unbelievable but we could never do that onstage. We haven’t been able to jam onstage since we stopped doing ‘Tommy’. Now, ‘My Generation’ onwards is all off the top of our heads.”
The good shows are paying of with handsome results. Normally cold, sterile and cavernous, the Who transformed Wembley into one giant mass of sweating bodies all moving on the same rhythms. I can`t even remember `Brown Sugar` doing that to people. The kid on the high steel beam nearly fell over. What`s most positive is the future. While fondly paying homage to the past, the Who are impressively saying hello to the present.
As one observer astutely remarked: “They almost look like they love each other.”

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The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
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ARTICLE ABOUT Roger Daltrey (The Who) FROM SOUNDS, June 28, 1975

This is a refreshingly honest interview with the one and only frontman of the Who. This one should be read by all as Mrs. Charone conducted a really good interview here. Nice one, Barbara!
Read on!

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Roger rides a rock horse

Exclusive Roger Daltrey interview by Barbara Charone

It was rather bizarre actually. There was this enormous inflatible lady, red satin knickers and racy black lace. But she was headless. And there was this silver space capsule plummeting towards earth. But it wasn`t really moving. And there was a patient Roger Daltrey saying “Lola B flat”. And an even more patient Ken Russell saying “Lola A flat”. It was really rather strange.
The fantasy and illusions stop for lunch. The inflatible lady stays behind in a dingy studio at Shepperton while the rest of the less plastic crew take time out from the very last day of shooting `Lisztomania` for lunch.
Franz Liszt climbs out of the space capsule and suddenly becomes Roger Daltrey. Roger Daltrey, actor, climbs out of some fancy grey threads into some scruffy denims and becomes Roger Daltrey, rock singer. We are back to square one.
The atmosphere is decidely more realistic inside the practical but unglamorous canteen. The food is the same standard, barely edible stuff found in any cafeteria but the clientele is more attractive. People from wardrobe and makeup, directors, sultry female extras, all sorts.

ROAST CHICKEN

Roger Daltrey looks up from his roast chicken, casting an eager eye over the colourful crowd. He is very tired today, feeling the blunt edge of continuous work for the last 18 months. Not content to stay home and mind the pigs, Roger Daltrey has been busy lately.
We were talking about this dead end rock has run into. “It`s nothing to do with getting old,” says a member of the world`s only intact and unchanged rock and roll band. “It`s just learning things, growing up and becoming mature. It`s the growing up that`s anti-rock. Rock isn`t refusing to grow up, it`s the people that buy it; it`s what they want to hear. That`s what doesn`t want it to change.
“It`s still only the four people in the band. That`s why we`ve lasted because kids want to see the Who, see those four people. You can`t just turn it off, go somewhere else and expect people to put up with it.
“If the Who went onstage like the Pink Floyd, with an incredible light show, and stood there like four dead people that sounded great, our fans wouldn`t put up with that. Nothing is going to change. So what do you do?” The singer asked passionately. “What do you do?”
If you are the Who, you do a great number of things. You let the machinery unravel, slowly, allowing individual components to function without group environments, positively hoping that frustrations will disappear and the machinery emerge well oiled and more impressive than before.
While not known for their intimate comradeship offstage, the Who have seen even less of each other over the last 18 months with each member pursuing various cinematic and musical projects.
This Summer the individual components are being fused together again for the recording of the first Who album since `Quadrophenia`. Before examing the machinery in toto, let us briefly turn our attention to one energetic cog in the cycle.

“This album is very positive,” said Roger Daltrey referring to `Ride A Rock Horse`, his second solo album released next week. “The first one was a bit negative. If I`d been too positive then, it would have done the Who a lot of damage. I`m not insecure about doing a solo album now, which I was before. It`s not a matter of proving anything. It`s just that I love singing.
“It`s more the way I sing ya know?” he looked up intently making you understand instantly. “Like when I did my first album everyone said `oh Daltrey`s gone soft`. But that was just a side of me that got overshadowed in the Who. This one`s got more balls to it. It`s not wishy-washy at all. And the strings,” he says becoming excited,” aren`t any of that Mantovani stuff.”
Solo albums are a curious breed of record, alternating between the good and the not so good, sometimes sinking to new depths of tastelessness. There is no Court of King Arthur concept here, simply 10 musical songs. You remember, those catchy refrains that last a couple of minutes and are easily hummed? That`s right, songs.
“What I tried to do is get all my different influences on the album. There are little bits throughout that you can hear. One song, `Near To Surrender`, is me old soul days. It reminds me very much of an Otis Redding song, not the actual sound but the way it feels, “(emphasis on the feel).
“Little touches are thrown in all the songs. Like on `Hearts Right` there`s a solo bit that`s very Beach Boys with a little Stevie Wonder thrown in.” The singer laughs. “And `Milktrain,`” he says of a song vocally reminiscent of the Who`s `Dogs`, “reminds me of Syd Barrett, it sums up 1967, that whole flower power period.
“And `Ocean`s Away` has that water bit which is `Quadrophenia`. Of Course,” – he flashes a very large grin, eliciting looks of approval from nearby tables filled with the sultry female extras – “the Who stinks all the way through it. The Who are all over the record.”

INSPIRATION

But only in spirit and inspiration. Like his last solo album, which exposed someone named Leo Sayer to the world, Daltrey has chosen to record songs by less familiar names. This wise move achieves two purposes, simultaneously showing off Daltrey`s voice and new songwriters. Who wants yet another version of the same old songs?
“As usual I didn`t write any of the songs. But if I can`t write, at least I can expose other people because there`s so many artists that can`t get heard. I`d love the album to be a success because the people I`m trying to expose are worthy of getting a bit of success at last. Russ Ballard (who produced the album) has been around for years. He`s Mr Underated.
“I could have produced the album myself but it wouldn`t have been as good as what Russ did. Producing yourself on record is like trying to direct yourself in a film. What`s good to you isn`t necessarily the best you can do. You`ve got to get that something else.”
On the album songwriters like Paul Korda, Bugatti and Musker, Philip Goodhand-Tait, and Ballard, are exposed to an even wider public than before. As if this isn`t enough, Daltrey plans on allowing undiscovered talent to grow and mature on this record label, Goldhawke, of which his album is the first release.
“I feel very good about the record company. The Who should have been doing that a long time ago. When Track was set up those were the original intentions but it backfired.
“In the early days Track was really good. There was Hendrix and Arthur Brown. Then nothing. They lost interest in their own company which is sad. I hope that never happens to me.”
Paul Korda, who wrote three very good songs on `Ride A Rock Horse` is presently in Memphis recording an album for Goldhawke, singing like a `male Nina Simone`. And there are more extraordinary plans.

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“We`ve got a group of young girls,” pause for decadent giggles, “who can really sing. And we`ve got this 16-year-old girl we found doing `Lisztomania`. We were doing a scene for a live concert. All the audience were young girls, the blue knicker brigade” – pause for more decadent giggles.
“At dinner they used to get up and entertain each other. And this one girl got up without a microphone and sang `River Deep Mountain High` and I couldn`t believe it! It was incredible. So we signed her up.”
And there`s the story about the guy who works in a `bloody tailor shop` and wrote a song for Roger. In a business continually low on enthusiasm, Roger Daltrey is an enigma, constantly full of enough energy and excitement to infuse any project despite the necessary voltage. Reacquainting themselves with each other again, the Who need an electrical shock.
“The Who need to get all that energy back together as a unit. At the moment we`re having problems finding that sorta energy. I`d like to see the Who back as a good rock and roll band,” Roger says with the vengeance of a real fan. “We are having a lot of problems. I won`t try and hide the fact that we are.”
I wondered if the problems merely revolved around not working together for a long time.
“It`s that and – well the group vehicle seems to have found it`s limitations on the surface. I think once we get down to it and really do it, we`ll find new boundaries. But at the moment, it all feels a bit cramped.”
With all the recent ballyhoo about the overwhelming `Tommy` film, one could easily attribute the band`s queasy feelings about communal confinement to the film. But the problems are deeper than just a fixation with that deaf, dumb, and blind boy.

FRUSTRATION

“No, the film hasn`t affected us,” Roger says somberly. “The problems started before the film. It`s us taking ourselves too seriously. That`s the main problem. You`ve got to draw the line somewhere.
“It definitely got to the point where it wasn`t fun anymore,” he says echoing similar statements made in the Press by Pete Townshend. “And if it ain`t fun why bother?
“It doesn`t all have to be fun but I`ve always enjoyed it. But it`s really a group thing. Pete`s having terrible problems with wanting to play again, play in the situation we were playing in. To me, it`s all down to us. You`ve got to go onstage and try to get better and better. Some nights you don`t succeed but after a length of time you do get better.
“Pete seems to want to be able to get better immediately when nothing has changed. I understand his frustration `cause he doesn`t want to jump, when they say jump. But then again, it`s also entertainment.”
For a long time now, critics have suggested that while elevating them to new heights of commercial and artistic acceptance, the `Tommy` album has done nothing but hold the band back. Daltrey disagrees.
“It`s not `Tommy` that held us back. Nobody wanted to listen to what we were doing. `Who`s Next` holds up much better than `Tommy` but nobody wanted to take it seriously. Nobody wanted to give it the amount of thought they gave `Tommy`, just because it was 10 songs and no great, big, bloody thing about a spastic. It was just a bunch of songs rescued from another concept (Lifehouse).
“The whole head of the group was good at that time. We`d had the huge thing of `Tommy`. We were out there playing because we really wanted to play. No big heavy numbers. It was great,” Roger sighs in fond memory. “That was the most enjoyable period of my time with the group.
“The only thing I was down about then was a fear that the Who were getting overshadowed by the synthesiser. It didn`t happen because we took the songs onstage and did without it.
“In `Quadrophenia` we got drowned in it,” he laughs, “and funny enough `Drowned` was the only song that pulled us out. That was my main argument, you`ll never get the Who to play like machines. We`re not robots.”

Sure enough the inevitable happened. Taking `Quadrophenia` on the road without using additional musicians and destroying what made the Who great, meant using complicated tapes of backing tracks. Being a band that thrived more on emotion than mechanics, the Who would often start before the tapes and the tapes would sometimes start before the Who. On a good night they started together.
“What happened with rock and roll music is that it got caught up in technology. Even though it takes leaps and bounds when new sounds come out, nothing really changes. There`s a parallel everywhere. Only technology changes. Rock took on an enormous race between 1964 and 1974 and that`s slowing down. Suddenly it`s got nowhere to go.
“Rock isn`t going to change,” Daltrey says, old passions returning. “All you can do is keep writing the same kind of songs. You can`t let it die. So much has been done but I can`t see something new coming along. That`s why being flexible is so important.
“And, at the moment, the Who isn`t very flexible,” – he says the word like it`s made out of plastic. “That`s where we`re finding the crunch at the moment.”
This being 1975, several founding rock bands seem to be feeling that same crunch. Traffic have broken up. Punters put bets on this being the Stones` last American tour. Time off the road becomes longer than time touring. The Who are the last salvation of a dying era. Do they feel that pressure to stay together?
“I don`t give a shit about that. I don`t care whether they expect us together or not. As long as the next thing we do is 1 per cent better than `Quadrophenia` then I`ll be well satisfied. The album will be a straight album, no concepts and it will get done this Summer. We`ve attempted to start it already,” he says delicately of the fragile situation called making records.
Several weeks ago there was a lovely Saturday afternoon when the sun shone all day and temperatures were pleasantly warm. A perfect day for a rock and roll concert but the schizoid bill at the Crystal Palace Garden Party hardly excited any followers.

Instead it was a very long day of pretty much unexceptional music and so it was with much pleasure that I watched the Who that same night, on a `Second House` re-run, going through their paces at last year`s Charlton concert.
“That`s the Who,” Roger says of the days the band played live. “Either we own up and say that`s what we do or we pack up. I just don`t know.”
We sat in silence for a few minutes, cups and saucers clanging away in the background. Movie people getting ready to go back to a world of illusions. Finally I asked the dreaded question. Is no more Who a reality now?
“Yeah”, he says hesitantly, “very much more. I can accept it now. I couldn`t two years ago. And the reason I think I can accept it now is because maybe we have done as much as we can do. It`s nothing to do with existing outside the Who. I could have done that years ago; we all could have, no doubt about that.
“It`s just you get to a point where maybe,” optimistic emphasis on the maybe, “maybe you`ve just done as much as you`re ever gonna do within that framework. That`s being really honest.”
But certainly you don`t want to believe that? “I keep telling myself it isn`t true,” Roger laughs returning to his more boisterous self, shedding the serious overtones. I`ll be in there fighting till the last bloody second but like I said, I could accept it now.”
Those are harsh words coming from, perhaps, the Who`s most dedicated fan, who through the years has continually spoken of the Who as some magical society, capable of possessing extraordinary powers. All of which is very true.
Several devout Who admirers expressed surprise over the band`s recent appearance at star-studded, Hollywood-type premieres held round the world to signal the opening of the film event of the year. Some disillusioned followers didn`t understand what Ann Margret, champagne and caviar had to do with rock.
“You`ve got to go in and say this is a film, it`s just bloody show biz. You`ve got to get into that head. It`s just a laugh, nothing more serious than that.
“Those premieres did Pete a lot of harm. He got all these paranoias about who the hell is going to like the Who now. I mean our fans still like us,” Roger says sincerely, almost trying to convince Townshend even though he`s not here. “The film ain`t important at all. It`s the Who that`s important.”
It is 1975 now and the Who have grown up. But so have the audience. `Quadrophenia` completed the circle. The Who must begin another circle or abandon the vehicle.
Lunchtime was over now. Roger Daltrey had to stop being a rock singer and become an actor again. The inflatable lady still wore red satin knickers and racy black lace. The space capsule was still plummeting towards earth. I thought about the Who survival. “Lola B flat” barked Ken Russell. It was really rather strange.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!
The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!
1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT John Entwistle (The Who) FROM BILLBOARD, March 15, 1975

I really enjoyed this one from Billboard. Don`t know the name of the journalist unfortunately – if anyone knows please drop me a line.
Read on.

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What supergroup member is currently on the road singing original versions of ’50s- flavored rock, has a personal goal of making bass guitar acceptable as a lead instrument, is working on four careers at the same time and credits his family and horror comics for his famous black sense of humor?
The answer to all of the above is John Entwistle, bass player of the Who, generally recognized as one of the  three or four most successful rock bands in the world.
All of the members have worked on various solo projects over the years, but Entwistle has been most prolific  (four LPs) and is the first to tour as a solo.
“The Who have never worked enough for me,” he says. “I like playing concerts. I like going on the road and I  like to be able to play a lot of my own material.
“What I’m doing with these oldie types of songs,” he continues, “is basically playing the music I never got to play. In England you start working in pubs and you do the top 20 of the day, which is what the Who did. So  I never got to play the old rock.”
Entwistle’s first two LPs were more in the contemporary rock vein, but with his third LP, “Rigor Mortis,” he  began penning tunes centered around old rock and mixing them with standards. The current set, “Ox,” is all original  and is considered by Entwistle a mix of tributes and parodies, the music being the tribute and the words and parody. “I’d never be so pretentious as to say I’m writing serious words,” he says. “I like funny words.
“The whole oldies thing is a kind of experiment,” he adds. “I thought I’d take myself back in time and imagine I was writing in the ’50s. Then I’d try to update it as I went along, album by album, and work my way back to the present. The band is getting so much better, though, that the next LP will be a bit more up to date.”
Entwistle admits the tour has enjoyed a kind of built-in acceptance because of his position with the Who. “We didn’t exactly have to fight our way to the top,” he smiles, “but again, people still think of me as the Who’s bassist and they really don’t know what to expect. They seem to like it anyway, even though they’re not getting ‘Magic Bus.'”

While the current album is selling well, Entwistle is also working on what he calls his real solo LP, a set without Ox behind him. He’s also writing a book, getting set to go back in the studio with the Who (who will tour again as soon as an LP is finished) and is playing bass on friends’ sessions.
“Doing things on our own has probably helped the group stay together,” he says. “In the early days, the only obvious way to do your own thing seemed to leave the band. I think I did it the hard way, by staying with the group and still going out on my own and I think that set kind of a precedent for all of us. The Who still comes first, but we’re all free to do other things.”
Entwistle is concentrating on oldies at the moment “because I play a lot of old rock records at home and there’s never enough. I get frustrated, and I feel other people must, too. As for the humor in the songs, my family has a very sick sort of English sense of humor and I’ve always read horror comics. I now have a complete set of ‘Creepy Comics.’
On the musical situation in England at the moment, Entwistle says he doesn’t like it “because you’re not selling a group now, you’re selling a song. In England they find a hit formula and stick to it. All the songs make the charts but they all sound alike. Unless the best musicians begin changing completely, I don’t see anything new coming.”
Entwistle says his big goal now “is to get the bass accepted as a lead instrument. I take leads on stage, and it can be done well. I’ve always played bass, unlike many bassists who start with guitar. I used to go to the guitar shop when I was younger and I realized there weren’t many bass players around, so I’d stand a better chance with that.”
As for the future, Entwistle will go into the studios with the Who again soon and will be doing “some writing with the Who rather than myself in mind. There’s no conflict with Pete (Townshend). He writes solely for the band and I write mainly for myself.”
And he will continue to stand like a statue on stage. “I always thought we’d look like lunatics if we all jumped around,” he says, “and besides, someone has to play. But I once got very paranoid because the kids weren’t screaming my name. One night I had a few drinks and came onstage moving and they started screaming my name. So I thought, Okay, I’ll go back to standing still. They scream at anything that moves.”

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

 

ARTICLE ABOUT John Entwistle (The Who) FROM SOUNDS, March 1, 1975

I really liked this interview with Mr. Entwistle. Some interesting facts are revealed too. Credit to Mrs. Charone for having this great talk.
Read on!

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Here`s to the next punch up

Everyone knows how difficult it was to get the Mona Lisa to smile – not to mention John Entwistle. Imagine Barbara Charone`s surprise when he cracked his stone face image.

The following words on John Entwistle will not mention the usual array of adjectives heaped on the infamous Who bassist. Nowhere on this page will you find any black print that reads morose, evil, creepy or other descriptions of that ilk. Just for a refreshing change we will expose the brighter side of John Entwistle.
For starters here`s some captivating trivia bound to fascinate even the most casual Who fan. At last we can now reveal that for a long time John`s lucky numbers were 127 and 8. So troublesome is this plaguing dilemma that for more than a few years all relevant hotel room numbers and telephone exchanges revolved around those very digits. Fascinating stuff this.

BEAUTIFUL

In addition to the usual assortment of beautiful guitars, and the unusual acquisition of a suit of armour that lurks mysteriously in his front room, John Entwistle owns four automobiles none of which he is able to drive. One of the cars in question of which he has never been caught even sitting in the driver`s seat, adorns a poster enclosed in his brand new album `Mad Dog.` The dog in question also belongs to John. Sneaky way of wending our way towards Ox isn`t it?
“What keeps the Who going,” John casually remarked propped up against the bar of a Wardour Street pub, “is the freedom for everyone in the group to do individual projects. This way if the Who ever broke up, we all have our own identity. Ox makes my position in the Who that much stronger.”
Balancing precariously on that very special working relationship the four men achieve, one wonders if Entwistle`s recent show of strength will offset that integral balance?

EVASIVE

“I would never want to disturb the balance of power in the Who,” John says being purposely evasive. “But Ox was the only move I could make. In the beginning Ox might have been a plaything but not now. I always talked about going on tour with the band but nothing ever happened. Now that I`m actually on the road, I realise it`s a feasible thing, not just a side interest. Ox is a definite thing that I want to do. And I want it to carry on as long as the band stays together,” – he laughs nervously, “throughout the rest of the Who`s career. It`s my means of playing my material onstage.”
“I`ll be less frustrated and more confident going back to the Who,” John matter of factly remarked sipping slowly on a brandy and American Dry. “Before Ox I couldn`t come to the front of the stage because I got so used to leaning back against my amplifiers and looking bored. I`ll still look bored,” he says snidely, “standing in front of the stage but I can`t change that. The only time I don`t look bored is when my mouth is moving.”
Wonderful sense of humour has our John, as he sits against the bar, mouth moving, boredom disappearing as he continues assessments and predictions of the past and future.
“I know I`m supposed to be the quiet one,” he says with a moving mouth, “but I think when I go back to playing with the Who again I won`t be standing back in the shadows. I`m quite used to standing out front now. Ox hasn`t changed my style of playing but it`s altered me a lot onstage. Doing announcements is completely new to me. I doubt if anyone knows what my natural voice sounds like. Some people in England do now but in the States they`ve never really seen me talk,” he laughs at the absurdity of it all.
“I am enjoying being the frontman but it`s hard work. The hard work isn`t onstage but off; doing interviews, radio tours. I`ve got a new record company, Decca, so I thought I might as well put on a happy, smiling face for the first album cause they won`t get that much cooperation from me for the second.”
What with the Who being, well rather popular, John must have been a bit apprehensive about going out on the road without his comrades of ten years, slightly worried that the audience would bombard the stage with verbal assaults like “where`s yer mates?”
“Sure most of the people that come to see me come expecting me to do some Who stuff but nicely enough no one has shouted out we want the Who. Only one person yelled out `Magic Bus` and I told him to get stuffed. Usually the requests have been from `Whistle Rymes` or songs like `Boris The Spider` and `Heaven And Hell.`

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“What I really mean to do more onstage with Ox is play bass solos. At the moment I`m trying to take over from guitar and keyboard solos on bass. I did do one but you probably didn`t notice because I push a button and the volume of my guitar suddenly doubles. No one notices cause the same thing has happened to Pete for years. People always wonder how he manages to play a lead phrase with his hands on a chord swinging his arms around and notes coming out but he`s using the same sort of guitar sound.”
Anyone with ears in good working condition must have noticed through the last couple years that Entwistle`s bass mastery has mysteriously improved. On `Quadrophenia` the prominent bass parts provided more than a solid underneath.
“I changed back to playing without a plectrum. `Tommy` was done with a plectrum but when `Who`s Next` came along I changed back to fingers. By the time we got to `Quadrophenia` I was used to recording with my fingers which makes me able to play much faster.
“`Quadrophenia` was really an instrumental album and you needed to hear the bass up, which seemed to hold the numbers together. I`ve always thought the bass had been light on all our albums up to `Quadrophenia`. Before that the only one I liked the bass sound on was `Live At Leeds`.”
Right now Ox are in America. When they return the band should be well oiled, running smoothly and ripe for perhaps a charity London gig, a possible benefit for the Battersea Dogs Home. Well something like that. While he`s away Decca have released the `Mad Dog` album, a curious assortment of past rock styles done up with a combination of serious and not-so-serious intentions. But the next Ox album should feature the band as it is in concert.
“That new album really started out as a `Rigor Mortis` album and then Ox was formed. We didn`t really know what directions we were going in till we played onstage. Now that we know it`s not going to be in that rock and roll vein. Obviously we`ll play some rock numbers, even the Who do that, but it will really be down to what we get together in the free form parts, improvising.

SPECTORISH

“It`s a nice change playing with a keyboard player. In the end it wasn`t worth having the bigger band. We`ve had two lady singers when we did that `Old Grey Whistle Test` because the single has female voices on it. Yeah I suppose the `Mad Dog` track was my sorta Spectorish number. I`ve always liked overdubbing lots of instruments. Unfortunately Spector discovered it first so everything after gets named after him.”
Aside from discovering multi-instrumentation and grandiose production after Spector, life for John Entwistle is good and productive. Unlike other musicians who sit back in their easy chair watching the caretaker keep the mansion tidy, Entwistle has been extremely busy taking part in the `Tommy` soundtrack album, mixing `Odds And Sods,` playing on `Fearless Flash` a rock musical of sorts, and producing the Sharks album that never was.
“I`ve spent the last year in the studio,” he says half seriously, “I have to be busy cause I can`t stand having free time. When the Who weren`t working I could have gone to the Bahamas for a month but I go out of my way to feel ill. When I`m healthy,” he says sardonically, “I feel ill.
“What I learned from producing that Sharks album is that I`m not built to be a producer. I started getting jealous, I wanted to play not suggest!”

OPPORTUNITY

But he will get the opportunity to play soon enough when the Who forge bravely into areas unknown this Spring to record their next vinyl effort.
“I`m really looking forward to doing the next Who album because it will be a straight album,” he says mustering up mild enthusiasm but secretly excited. “This next one won`t be such hard work cause `Quadrophenia` was difficult work. Some of those numbers had impact but others felt like padding. I like to hear the material rehearsed before we record which is what happened with the last album. The market will certainly be swamped with Who product soon,” he smiles slightly. “What with solo albums from Roger and Pete, the new Who album and the `Tommy` soundtrack.
“I don`t see the Who breaking up in the next six years, I hope,” he adds softly. “Nobody wants to break the Who up, not unless things started slipping downwards and we started to lose interest. But,” he predicted ordering another brandy and American, “that wouldn`t happen for at least three years.”
If time away from each other has given Who members individual self confidence, they should be able to reunite with renewed inspiration and enthusiasm. There will always be arguments, fights and squabbles as long as there is the Who and as even the most casual Who afficiando must know by now, the band do occasionally lose their collective tempers.
“The only time I got really angry was when we did a ten week American tour and came out of it with only £100 each,” John says in a burst of nostalgic recollections. “When I found that out I cut a mattress in half with a bowie knife. Every band has the same pressures but they don`t all come out of it.
“The thing about the Who,” John astutely concluded finishing up the last of the brandy, “is even when we did have punch-ups, we`d make up and get on even better.”
Here`s to the next punch-up.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Joe Cocker, Argent, Paul McCartney, The Troggs, Chaka Khan, Lindisfarne, Rupert Holmes, Black Oak Arkansas, Labelle, Return To Forever, Arthur Lee, Flying Burrito Brothers, Glitter Band, Andy Fraser, The Sound of Philly, Back Door, Ronnie Lane, ELO, Tom Paxton.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.