ARTICLE ABOUT Frank Zappa FROM SOUNDS, November 27, 1971

I do love a little bit of Zappa in between all those rock bands here. One of the most talented musicians in modern music history have his natural place here, as he also have in my record collection.
Be well dear readers – until my next update!

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Zappa`s latest box of tricks

A interview by Steve Peacock

Frank Zappa is pretty pleased with his first movie, “200 Motels”. Ask how he feels about it now that it`s all finished and he`ll say: “I think it turned out pretty good.” Tell him that British pop pundit Tony Palmer, who worked on the film, thinks it`s the worst pop film he`s seen, and he`ll say: “That`s quite a distinction. But then he`s such a controversial little rascal.”
Ask him if he can see any reason for Palmer to describe it that way, and he says: “Self publicity for himself perhaps?” It`s not so much arrogance, it`s a strong belief in what he`s doing, and as he says, he does things for people to enjoy, not for critics to write about.
He enjoys it too. He enjoyed making it, and he enjoys watching it. I`d been saying that it was a bit difficult to take in all at once, the first time. “It is a bit difficult. I remember the first time I saw it when it was completed, and I`d been looking at it for months and months in various stages of development but when the final colour print first came back, I went to a screening, sat there, and I didn`t even listen to it – I just looked at it, because I couldn`t believe what it looked like.

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“I wasn’t even connecting the dialogue or the music with the pictures up on the wall, it was a silent movie as far as I was concerned. After the third or fourth time I began to assimilate it all.”
I was starting to ask about the way he’s approached making the movie. He’s explained at length before what the film was about how it showed that touring makes you crazy, but presumably he’d seen other pop films and he had ideas about how to do it himself. He immediately picked up on the phrase “pop films”.
“I’m not an avid fan of pop films, but you get dumped into that category by virtue of the fact that the film revolves around a group of people who happen to be musicians. I think I would use the same people whether they were musicians or not. I happen to be interested in making a musical film, but a lot of the music in it is not pop. In a way that’s unfortunate because it’s not like one of those regular rock and roll movies.
“But as far as the ideas for the technical things went, I had seen many examples of the special effects you can get, and I had some idea of the capabilities of video technique. 99% of the effects in the movie happen live while you’re working, which means you can see how they’re going to turn out at the time, and you don’t have to send them away to a lab and get them to do it for you. If you don’t like it you just erase it and do it again. It was extremely appropriate for this film.”
Was there anything in the film he felt didn’t work as well as it could have done, or anything he had to leave out?
“There was plenty of stuff that was left out that might have been more interesting to leave in, if certain other parts had been shot. But you must remember that we only had a seven day shooting schedule and as it was one third of the script, which was 320 pages long, didn’t get shot at all, and so there was a certain amount of restructuring to be done at the point where we were putting the thing together.”
But had he had, say, two weeks on the sound stage, it would have been a very different film? “It very definitely would have been, but that’s beside the point really. What’s there is there, that ‘200 Motels’, that’s the way Fate has made it occur. I also would’ve liked to have had the soundtrack in stereo, but I didn’t have the budget for that either.”

COMPUTERS

Perhaps with the success of “200 Motels”, he’ll get a better budget for his next project, “Billy The Mountain”. Part of the script and some of the music for this is already written, and the Mothers may be performing extracts from it at their Rainbow Theatre concerts in London next month. After the current tour, Zappa will be going back home to finish work on the script and the music. Will he be using the same techniques to make the next film?
“No, there’ll be some improvements in terms of technique. There’s a possibility of involving computer technology in conjunction with the videotape to do even more outrageous things. I don’t want to be too specific with you because a lot of the things are patentable, but say I’ve invested some money in research and development on some machines to extend the capabilities of video, and you might be hearing something in the next few weeks about the success of those experiments.”
The music for the film will be played by the Mothers – “doing our rock and roll comedy music” – and by a synthesiser orchestra. “There’ll be a number of special devices that are in development right now, that’ll do a number of unusual things to the human voice, and also extend the capabilities of the voice by enabling a person’s speech or singing voice to trigger circuits which will cause that voice to be accompanied by synthesised orchestral ensembles, that will be exactly in synchronisation and exactly on pitch with that voice, no matter what it’s doing.
“Say you’re talking. There’s a device that will find out the important information harmonically about the content of your voice, and generate a signal which’ll turn on other devices which will poop out of a speaker on the other side of the stage a sax section that’ll play chords that’ll accompany exactly the rhythm of your speech and the inflection of your speech. It could produce a very interesting kind of music.”

How far advanced is the work on these devices? “They’ve been tested and they work. The only thing I’m waiting for is to get off the road, go back to Los Angeles, and have the guy that’s working on the project hand me a completed box. It’s just a question of putting it all into a little black box with knobs on.”
And learning how to use it? “Right, but that’s not too bad, because once you have the proper amount of rehearsal with the members of the group, all they have to do is adjust their ear to the fact that every time they talk there’s going to be an ensemble of some sort cranking along behind them, that they can’t get rid of. There’s no way you can fool it – if you go out of tune it goes right out of tune with you.”
How do they feel about that? “Oh, they’re interested in doing it. The Mothers of Invention? You know how experimental they are.”
The way they’re going to make the film this time, is to shoot the Mothers straight. playing the music and narrating the story of Billy The Mountain. After that, they’ll use insets and superimpositions, and other fiendish tricks, to illustrate the story; shots of the Mothers acting out the story in costume, and animation sequences.
Would it be as fast moving as the first movie? “Oh yes, at least as fast, but I think you’ll be able to follow it because there’s a linear story – this definitely has a plot. It’s a kind of fairy tale situation and it has events that follow each other in the acceptable plodding manner that people like to identify with.”
Would he like to outline the plot? “Ah let’s see. I don’t want to get too specific, and give the whole plot away, but it’s something like this:
“It tells the story of the creation of life on this planet and in this version, it begins with an empty sky, a fat maroon sofa floating around in it, God sees the sofa, admires it, and decides to explain to the sofa the basis of their future relationships, and he does this, singing in German.

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Then he decides he needs some entertainment so he summons his girlfriend The Short Girl, and her assistant, Squat The Magic Pig, and proceeds to shoot a home movie using the girl and the pig and the sofa. And when he’s finished shooting the film he has some Winged Holy Children take it to a lab where they don’t ask any questions, and while he’s waiting for his rushes to come back he lays down on the sofa to take a nap, and as soon as he goes to sleep, he has a great dream, and when he dreams the Devil appears.
Now the Devil walks out of a cave and he introduces himself with a song and dance routine, and he has these cloven hoofs, you see, and he’s stomping around on the rocks outside the cave and the sparks from his hoofs ignite all adjacent moss, and the moss goes up in flames, the smoke is billowing around, and as he sings in a low voice the smoke turns to stone forming several lumpy new mountains, and one of them can talk. And the one that can talk is named Billy the Mountain.
Billy The Mountain has a tree growing off his shoulder named Ethel, and Ethel is his girlfriend, who soon becomes his wife, and Ethel the Tree is under the control of Old Zircon, the phased-out Byzantine devil. Old Zircon induces Ethel the Tree to trick Billy the Mountain into taking her on a vacation. And so he gets up on his massive granite foot, and starts walking across America, and he’s destroying America as he walks from California to Virginia Beach.
Meanwhile, in a small neat room behind a grocery store, there’s this mysterious figure named Studebaker Hawk, and Studebaker Hawk is dressed in a chequered tablecoth with waxdrips on it from some candles stuffed up a Chianti bottle, and he’s wearing dark green denim trousers such as a bus driver might enjoy, and he sits before a glowing view screen on which he monitors all things potentially dangerous to civilisation as we know it. And on this screen he’s watching Billy the Mountain.

Now Billy has this large cliff for a jaw, and when he talks the cliff goes up and down, and clouds of brown smoke puff out, and rocks and boulders hack up, and he (Studebaker Hawk) sees the new brown clouds coming out of Billy’s mouth and he sings about it because he becomes worried about the implications of brown clouds in terms of the ecology. He gets on the phone to informed Sources in Washington DC. and finds that the line is busy.
Meanwhile, all these disasters keep happening in the Mid-West. On his way. Billy gets hungry, and he eats a diner. You know what a diner is? Well in the United States they have these restaurants that are made out of old street cars, and he eats one. He sees it’s got all this rancid food in it so he eats the whole street car – all the stale lemon pies and bacon drips, he eats the cash register and the chlorophyll lozenges and gum displayed nearby.
But as he’s walking, he finds that it’s interfered with his delicate granite intestinal membranes, causing severe gas, fire, and molten lava, and Billy the Mountain becomes Billy the Volcano, about the time he gets to Indiana. He’s vomiting all these melted chrome diner appliances all over the countryside.
By this time Studebaker Hawk has finally gotten a call through to his informed sources in Washington, and he meets a character called Little Emil, who gives him a code, and when Studebaker Hawk manages to figure out the code he discovers that the Government wants him to stop the rampaging volcano.
And the way they want him to stop it is by sneaking up on it with a special new bomb which will not only destroy the volcano but it’ll wipe out the middle of the United States to a width of about a thousand miles. And this upsets him because he thinks of the long range ecological consequences of such a disaster.”

FARMERS

“So he thinks to himself that there must be some mistake, that the computer in the Pentagon must have gone apeshit, because their rationale for doing this, as explained by the code, is you can go ahead and blow up the Mid-West because those dumb f-king farmers will never know the difference. That’s what the computer print-out had said. So he gets suspicious, and he refuses to obey his orders and calls Washington back, and says he has another better way to stop Billy the Mountain.
And the rest of the story is the part I don’t want to give away, because it’s what Studebaker Hawk’s plan is, and who Little Emil really is, because he doesn’t work for the Government, he owns it.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Redbone, Elton John, Redwing, Carl Palmer, B.B. King, Bill Williams, Alice Stuart, Fanny, Robbie Robertson, Lesley Duncan, Dave Burland.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Led Zeppelin FROM SOUNDS, November 20, 1971

A quick one that I just needed to share with you. The review of Led Zeppelin`s legendary “4” album or the “Four Symbols” album as it is also called. Did the reviewer like it? Read and find out.

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Led Zeppelin`s best of both worlds

Led Zeppelin (Atlantic 240 1012).

By Billy Walker

Side one of this, Zeppelin`s fourth album, contains perhaps the band`s best recorded material to date. For me it smashes everything Zeppelin have done before into the ground, it`s more innovative and driving than “Black Mountain Side”, “Whole Lotta Love”, “Heart Breaker” or “Gallows Pole”. The last album was a very positive move away from what we`d come to expect from the band, but this one gives you the best of both worlds – the excitement of the rock and rolling Zeppelin, and the beauty of the acoustical side which they are more and more into.
“Old Style Zep” is represented by the opening track “Black Dog”, Bonham crashing and exploding around his drum kit, while Page and Paul Jones lay down the added drive which prods and pushes Plant into those lung-splitting screeches. To cap it all they`ve included some thrusting breaks between his vocals which typified a lot of their earlier work. “Rock And Roll” continues the pace but “The Battle Of Evermore” completely breaks the spell. Sandy Denny joins Robert in a really fine song, the band play around it delicately. Plant comes out of it very well, using much more control and poise than most people would give him credit for.
But just when you begin to feel that the best must have gone, they move into “Stairway To Heaven”, the best track on the album, which opens slowly – building in speed verse by verse. The lyrics and musicianship are really beautiful and it`s Bonham that really starts to move it into an up-tempo tune, kicking it along until the final verse, when Jimmy Page takes an electric guitar solo, showing the verve and flair we know he possesses but it`s Plant`s powering, bludgeoning vocals that finally see the track out.
Side two, whilst not up to the same standard, contains “Going To California” (a slowish acoustic tune with Plant doing country vocals) and “When The Levee Breaks” and two other tracks, but despite “Levee`s” punch and commanding strength there`s a strong urge to quickly get back to the first side again.

Led zep

I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ray Charles, Marc Bolan, Bell & Arc, Ornette Coleman, Rory Gallagher, The Who, Paul McCartney, Van Morrison, Mr. Fox, Mountain.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Felix Pappalardi (Mountain) FROM SOUNDS, November 20, 1971

This interview can be difficult to read because of the lack of punctuation. But it is still an important article that I wanted to share because of Mr. Pappalardi`s early demise. Killed by his wife, Gail, in 1983, with a derringer he had given her as a gift a few months previously.
In later years, Pappalardi became known for his non-musical proclivities, which included the usual chemical experiments as well as an open marriage with Collins. Her jealousy of one particular mistress reportedly led to the argument that ended in his death, although Collins maintained that she’d shot Pappalardi accidentally while taking a firearms training session. The fact that it happened at 6:00AM didn’t dissuade jurors from handing in a surprising verdict, convicting her of criminally negligent homicide rather than murder.
Pappalardi was an American music producer, songwriter, vocalist, and bassist. He is best known to the public as the bassist and vocalist of the band Mountain, but he also produced several well-known artists, among them were Cream.
An important figure in the early rock music history, this article deserves to be found on the internet.
Have a good read.

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In the talk-in

Along with guitarist Leslie West, Felix founded Mountain back in 1969. Best known for his work with Cream, bass player / producer / arranger Pappalardi has been involved with Tim Hardin, Tom Paxton, John Sebastian, Youngbloods, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Tom Rush and many more artists, but is now totally committed to Mountain and its welfare. He lives, with his wife Gail Collins, on the island of Nantucket, off the coast of Massachusetts, which was once the centre of America`s whaling industry. The island and it`s traditions play a great part in his life and inspired the band`s last album “Nantucket Sleighride”. Mountain`s new album, released this week, is titled “Flower Of Evil”.

Interview: Billy Walker Picture: Spud Murphy

When did you first start producing?

In `63/4, I started as a studio musician arranging for people like Richie Havens, Ian and Sylvia, Tim Hardin – I spent a lot of time with Tim – Sebastian, Cass Elliott. Then in the fall of 1966 Jessie Colin Young asked me if I would produce the Youngbloods and I said sure. The very first thing we did was “Get Together” which three years later was a top five single. I finished that album and then I went to Atlantic and sort of became Armet Ertegun`s protege, he “found me” you know? We were doing projects and then he put me in the studio with Cream.

How did you initially get into session work?

I went down to the Village and began playing with all those cats down there. Paul Rothchild was a producer at the time for Elektra and was drawing from down there. John Sebastian and I became virtually a studio team and began doing that kind of work until he evolved finally and got his own band and then I was with Ian and Sylvia for a while.
Actually the thing that got me into production was that I would do an arrangement like “Morning Morning” for Richie Havens or something for Buffy Sainte Marie and when I`d be writing the arrangement I`d be hearing one thing in my head, a certain lushness, and when I`d hear the final mix it wouldn`t be there.

Mountain and Cream apart what has been your most satisfying production job?

I was pleased with the Youngbloods project as far as it went and I was pleased with my association with Tim Hardin because Hardin was very important to us all. I played bass on “If I Were A Carpenter” but Tim and I go back a couple of years before that, he was innovative and very, very influential and very important to me.

At what point did you meet up with Leslie West?

`67 right after I finished “Disraeli Gears”. I did two sides with a band called the Vagrants which Leslie was in and dug him. Our association grew throughout this time until Cream was finished and after. I did the “Goodbye” album which was Cream but it was also Cream and myself, and George Harrison in one case on “Badge”, and I got the job done somehow that`s what happened. I figured if I hadn`t have shoved for “Goodbye” to happen it never would have happened, those three studio tracks would never exist.
The live album that came out after that although it says “produced by Felix Pappalardi” I didn`t have anything to do with that. I did sanction the release of those tapes, I wasn`t in the position to sanction or not sanction them. At that time Cream was over and it was up to Stigwood.

I don`t want to dwell on Cream, but…

I don`t mind man, it`s a real part of what I`ve done and I`m naturally proud of it. From the American Press I have always been resented from my association with Cream. They`re stupid to start with, they`re as dumb as anybody could be, they don`t have the education to cope with a lot of the music that is going down they`re just dumb. They believe that music started and ended in the Delta and you and I know that`s not the story, but you can`t tell them that.
They feel that I meddled with Cream, they wanted an advanced Mayall`s Blues Breakers but I didn`t give a flying f–k what they wanted. I had a band in the studio and Jack Bruce was extremely important to that band, in fact if not the driving force musically in that band and as a producer I had to cope with what was happening there and not what I thought Rolling Stone magazine wanted. And it`s that level of education that I`m talking about that I believe exists here (in Britain) but does not exist there and never will.

How much a part do you feel you played on Cream`s final sound and direction?

Production, and the way I produce, that`s only a part of what I do. I arrange and the whole shot like “Eric play here, don`t play there” you know what I mean? He probably wouldn`t like to hear me say that but that`s where it`s at, that`s where it was at, that`s what I did and Jack and I a lot of times would work on the arrangement. For instance there was “Pressed Rat And Worthog”, Ginger`s thing, and Jack and worked on that and worked on it, and worked it into the amazing thing I thought it wound up being, the sort of thing that came out of it, like a huge orchestral sound.
That, I think, was basically resented in the States but it`s not by the people somehow it`s by these dudes that have got nothing else to do with their time but sit around and criticise, particularly Rolling Stone which I see as a local San Francisco newspaper. They give five pages on a band you`ve never heard of that`s rehearsing in their own county but Mountain comes over to Britain and does what it does and you don`t hear a word about it, they don`t like the idea.

At the time of Cream Felix Pappalardi was just a producer and the guy who played the cowbells, did you ever feel the need to get out of that and form your own band?

I knew it was inevitable, I knew it was coming. Gail and I knew it was coming for sure. I don`t like doing anything unless I feel I`m good and prepared for it. At the time I wasn`t ready to have my own band.

Do you feel that Cream`s break up speeded it along a little though?

Oh yes. I could have spent a lot more time producing Cream. I felt a certain responsibility towards them, I don`t know why. Yes, I do know why, they were a phenomenal band.

It`s been said that Mountain, and other bands including Grand Funk, were formed specifically to fill the enormous void left by Cream, how do you feel about these statements?

Well, there was a huge void left in my life. I was a substantial part of them and it was a band I wanted, I had to move on, playing with other people is all influence, it`s a constant cyclical so who knows what I brought from Cream to Mountain or what I brought to Mountain of me that I used in Cream and taken to its logical conclusion I don`t think there`s anybody who can sort all that out. But for my own self I don`t care, I`m interested primarily in improvisation, I`m interested in players as opposed to just people who play the same notes all the time.
Improvisors, players, are constantly working off, you start working off of a clichè, however else are you going to start? Every lick has been played one way or another so you start off in a time, working off a clichè until you get so far out on that limb that you work yourself into playing something you`ve never heard before which is innovation, which is new, which is the pressure and the beauty of improvisation which is really what Mountain is all about we`re a playing band. But different than Cream was a playing band because this is a band that is definitely under leadership. When Leslie`s taking a solo this band is taking care of business, behind Leslie. There`s nobody playing and saying “look at me I can play that lick better”. It`s “get behind Leslie” because he`s got to feel it.
With Cream, Eric would get into a feel and then perhaps the others would come in, he couldn`t get into a groove long enough. I think that was probably one of the huge problems, Eric was the lead horn, there was no other way to think about it, yet there was this fantastic bass player capable of lead, if it had been organised to the point where Eric would be taking care of business behind Jack, and then Jack and Ginger behind Eric, it might have worked.
On the other hand that was the result of it not being that way was part of the excitement also of Cream, this phenomenal counterpoint, constant, rhythmic and melodic. That`s all to say that Mountain is basically an improvisational unit, a playing band as much as a jazz band is a jazz band.

When you produced Leslie`s solo album “Leslie West, Mountain” did you know then that he was a musician you had to play with?

Not at the time, Mountain didn`t come together until `69, it was just after I had done Leslie`s album and then come to London to do Jack`s “Songs For A Tailor”. When I got back I decided to go on the road just to get Leslie started and then as I got out there in order to put a show together that I figured was right I began to sing, got sucked into that, fired the drummer that I originally hired to just go out and get Leslie going and then we got Corky, Steve Knight was already with the band but I knew he was right. He wasn`t a keyboard player he was a trombone player, tuba player, bass player but I needed a musician to play keyboard, I didn`t need a triple-flash on the organ. Now he`s developed, put his musicianship into the keyboard.
It was Gail`s idea that Corky joined us, we did ten days` rehearsing then September we did the Boston Tea Party and as far as I`m concerned that was the beginning of Mountain, that was when I made the commitment to them to stay with this band. Soon after we did “Climbing”, Mountain`s first album, and then a year later “Nantucket Sleighride” and up to “Flowers Of Evil” our latest album.

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Steve Knight`s organ playing, while an important part of Mountain`s sound, isn`t as prominent as many organists, will there be a time when he will be more to the front?

For instance, on “Roll Over Beethoven” his playing is fierce. His treatment of the keyboard in “Nantucket Sleighride” itself, “Animal Trainer And The Toad” and things like that is so broad and his musicianship so good that it can evolve any time, he really can. I trust it will, given time.

Did your writing partnership with Gail start before Mountain or was it brought about by the need for material for the band?

The best was to give you an example to answer that is on “Nantucket Sleighride”, “Travellin` In The Dark” was actually written in 1965 and first recorded in 1967. I thought it was right for “Nantucket Sleighride” so we did it. Gail and I had actually started writing in 1964 together, so we`ve been working on it for a long time now.

Gail also did the covers of Mountain`s three albums, were they specially designed for each album?

The actual oil painting on “Nantucket Sleighride” was also done in 1966, the original is, in fact, backwards of that shown on the album. She does all the designs and the major portion of the photography and the main portion of the visual presentation and has always done so.

In your songwriting does Gail provide the lyrics and you supply the music?

Most of the time that`s the way it is. She`s written some gorgeous melodies and I`d like to do a whole set of orchestrations for an album of them. For instance “Travellin` In The Dark” is mostly my lyric, and “Crossroader”, but without Gail I could never get it, the most important thing is being a songwriting team. Me and my old lady fight but never about that, that`s always straight ahead.

Leslie`s and Gail`s and your style are very evident in the band`s sound, his very raw and abrasive and yours more melodic, are Corky and Steve moving into writing very much, will it alter Mountain`s style?

Corky is in the process of arriving at a style. On the new album I knew what I wanted from it, I wanted a certain thing and style and knowing that I wanted what I wanted so definitely out of what was to become “Flowers Of Evil” that had it been something that Leslie didn`t dig the shit would have hit the fan. But it happened that what I was striving for, the only thing that I would accept, was something that knocked everybody out, and I think every album will be that kind of turning point for the band and if it isn`t I think it`s a waste of studio time.
It should be that important a task, it should be that much of a shake-up. “Nantucket” is different from “Climbing” and the next is going to be different from all of those and that`s what I mean by innovative so that even now when people say Mountain sound like something anybody that`s got half a brain is gonna say “either you haven`t listened to the band or you`re a fool.”

The album “Nantucket Sleighride” plainly shows your great interest in the history of whaling, were the majority of the songs written with this interest in mind?

“Travellin` In The Dark” for instance, when I`m out in Nantucket sometimes and the fog rolls in I think to myself that those dudes leaving their wives and families for three years to go around the Cape and not seeing anybody for that time, it`s a long and frightening break and all those references are there. “Nantucket Sleighride” is by no means over for me that was just the beginning of it for me, Nantucket`s my home and if I die, I`ll die there.

Mountain once played the Fillmore six times in a week, how does this sort of pressure tell on the band`s stamina?

A show now can go two hours, there was a time when Leslie would get physically sick after 55 minutes but now he`s used to it. Last Friday we did Milwaukee that went 1 hour 55 minutes. Sure we were tired and there wasn`t much happening after the show but we felt good. It`s hard, like being on an athletic team, I can`t stay up the night before and f–k around, I can`t do it because I know if I do I know I`m not going to be able to drive the band.
If Corky stays up all night with some broad and then lays back on stage and I`ve got to honk him, but if I`m not on top of him he`d run me into the ground, he`s a strong cat and only twenty-three years old. So I`ve got to take my black pill and go to sleep.

The sound you manage to achieve on bass is particularly powerful, how do you get this level of power?

I think my wattage is dangerous, I`ve got so much of it and the bass is souped up. The amps were originally experimental Hendrix amps that he originally used but I don`t know how I ended up getting them. Our guys have done some work on them and I`ve got a very powerful instrument, the pick-up itself is very powerful and my basic sound is always wide open on the amp. My amp`s always on 10, bass is completely off and treble is always full, conture`s completely full. All the dynamics are being done from my bass, so I`m playing what I`d guess you`d call completely distorted all the time, but it`s distorted with tone.

There were rumours in Britain recently that Mountain had split, was there any truth of a break or were the band resting?

There wasn`t a rumour in the States but we heard about the rumour here that I had split to write and produce. As long as I can get the people that are booking the band and “managing” the band to understand that we cannot keep on going the way we are going now under any circumstances there`s going to be a choice, either it`s going to be done my way or I`m going to quit. It`s as simple as that, I`m not going to play this game any more of three-days-a-week working in the States, so if it`s not done my way there will be no more Mountain, however I can promise you there will be a Mountain because it`s going to be done my way.

If a split did come about could you see yourself playing with anyone but Leslie?

No, Leslie`s my man, it would be a joke. It`s a once-in-a-lifetime thing and we both know that. The problem is the people who are booking and managing the band, the philosophy has got to change. When the band goes out now, and it`s getting nearly three years old, it`s time to cut that crap out of two three-week periods off a year and the rest of it on the road. Three days out on the road and four days off to recuperate so you can get yourself together for the next three days it`s just got to stop.
In other words whenever the band goes out on the road it`s got to be an occasion, I`m sick of going to cities three times a year where somebody reads an ad and says “Mountain`s in town again, well I don`t think we`ll go this time because they`ll be back in three months.” We get a fantastic audience but we`re killing ourselves. It will change, it`s just a matter of me having enough time to formulate how it`s going to be and socking it to everybody.
The Who are very bright when it comes to this sort of thing. When you have something like a Who or a Mountain you don`t put their asses out on the road like they were a bunch of whores.

On “Flowers Of Evil” the title track has a very positive story line, could you expand on it?

What that`s commenting on is the boys in America that go to Vietnam to fight that bullshit thing over there and they get hooked on smack (heroin). They`re okay for fifty dollars over there, Private First Class pay, they can stay nice and mellow for a week. They come back after their tour of duty is over and it costs them a thousand dollars for the first nine days, so what`s been happening in America is these guys are home and are spending all the money they`ve saved so they go right back to the recruiting centres and sign up for another three years and put in for Saigon so they can get back and get high.
Nixon and the Government are aware of the problem but still they`re closing Methodon centres and here are these kids that are coming back with a Jones (habit) and a half. Anyway that`s the thing that`s probably going to save Mountain because all of us have a Mountain Jones, we`re all hung up on Mountain. Leslie would be a miserable dude without Mountain and so would I.

“Nantucket Sleighride” was dedicated to Owen Coffin, could you tell me a little more about the legend that surrounds him?

The Coffin family first of all was one of the great Nantucket families one of the original owners of the island and one of the great whaling families. Owen was seventeen when he went on his fateful first and last voyage on the Essex. The two biggest disasters in Nantucket`s whaling history were the Globe and the Essex, the Globe was a mutiny and the Essex was stoved by a whale. George Pollard was the captain of the Essex and he was only twenty-eight and was Coffin`s uncle.
They were into a school of whales and the longboats were out with the harpooners doing their number, then all of a sudden, about a hundred yards off the stern of the ship, a whale was noticed heading for the mother ship (the Essex) picking up speed and then stove in the front of the boat. It came underneath the ship and wallowed off to the side, knocked semi-conscious, the captain realised he was losing his ship and began making preparations for an emergency.
They were a long way from landable land (owing to cannibals) and as they were preparing to leave the ship the whale stove in the other side, they salvaged what they could and this was in August and it was February before the last survivors were picked up. In one of the longboats there were five men and they had to resort to cannibalism finally, to sacrifice one man so that the others might live and Owen Coffin drew the short straw. He was in the longboat with his uncle George Pollard who refused to partake of him but the others did and survived.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ray Charles, Marc Bolan, Bell & Arc, Ornette Coleman, Rory Gallagher, The Who, Paul McCartney, Van Morrison, Mr. Fox.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Paul McCartney FROM SOUNDS, November 20, 1971

A really interesting article printed just a few weeks before the first album that Wings released. In itself a very good band with some good tunes, but nothing less than you would expect from one of the major songwriters of this modern world. Personally I have always had a very weak spot for the Beatles, and I think they are probably THE most important group of musicians that ever was or ever will be. Yes, I am a fan of the Beatles, and anyone with just a small amount of musicality in them would and should agree.
Enjoy this interview with Sir Paul McCartney from way back.

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Trying to keep things loose

Paul McCartney talks to Steve Peacock

Paul McCartney, sitting on the control desk in EMI`s number 2 studio at Abbey Road – “I went to New York looking for the best studio in the world, but I prefer it here,” – was talking, not unnaturally, about his new band, Wings.
“The night before John said he was leaving the group and all that, we were at home and it suddenly dawned on me. `If everyone else doesn`t want to do it, I`ll get my own band, even if it`s just a little country and western thing or something like Johnny Cash, just so I can get in there and have a sing.` Because that`s all I wanted, just to play.

HIDING

Everyone did really, everyone was trying to play, but no-one wanted to do it with the Beatles.”
It`s been a long time since then, and Paul`s the only one who hasn`t yet got out on the road. John`s done it – Cambridge, Toronto, Fillmore East – George has done it – with Delaney and Bonnie, and with Ringo and all the others at Madison Square Garden. But Paul`s been hiding away. There`ve been two albums which haven`t had very good reviews, and which personally I`ve found rather lifeless, plus the odd single.

HANDHOLDS

But now there`s Wings – a band. There are no firm plans for going on the road, though at the moment they`d like to do it, but there`s an album. We listened to it at the studio – McCartney jiggling about in his seat to it, obviously delighted – and certainly to me it sounded as if after years of reaching out for handholds, McCartney had found out how to do it again.
One side rocks hard and loud, the other side moves more slowly – just like the old records, one side for jiving, the other for smooching. That`s the way he planned it. “Mumbo” is the first track, and maybe THE track. “Bip Bop” sounds a bit like the Stones` “Stray Cat Blues”.
“Love Is Strange” is the old rocker`s words set to a reggae beat, and it works, “Wild Life” is the title track, with a strong vocal, a nice guitar solo, and a sound that isn`t far away from the first Moody Blues album. Good old Denny Laine.
Side two has an overall sound that`s pretty close to the Beatles when they were close – ooh-aah backing vocals, rhythm guitars, short solos. It ends with “Dear Friend” – very slow, piano, strings. “That`s the only one that`s at all about the Beatles situation,” he says. “Throw the wine – shut up, stop messing about.” But on “Wild Life” there`s a line that refers to “a lot of political nonsense in the air.”
Later, he was talking about political nonsense, all the trouble between him and the others, between the McCartney`s and Linda`s father, John Eastman, and Allan Klein. Politics, Paul called it, and he didn`t like it. All he wanted was to be out of the whole thing, to own the copyright to his own songs, forget the Beatles, sign a piece of paper saying we`ve split up, everything`s going to be shared by four.

CRAZY

“And John said, “Yeah, but that`s like asking us to stop the bombing in Vietnam.” We eventually decided that we were all Vietnamese, so that`s all right…
“But I keep wanting to send him postcards saying `The war`s over if you want it” – tell him what he`s saying. It`s just crazy, I`m sure the truth`s a whole lot more simple than it`s made out.”
Talking about John: “John`s John. John wants to wipe everything away and start again, but in doing so he never wipes anything away. He wants it to be him and Yoko against the world, or whatever, but he`s still in with all the others, in with all the contracts and going in to the meetings and everything.
“He`s getting pissed off with it though – I sense it. I`ve had a couple of good conversations recently with just John, and I`ve felt a lot of common ground with him. And I watched him on the Parkinson show, and really a lot of the things he`s into, we`re into as well.”

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STRAIGHTS

Did he like John`s albums?
“I liked `Imagine`, I didn`t like the others much. But really, there`s so much political shit on at the moment that I tend to play them through once to see if there`s anything I can pinch.” And how does he sleep?
“I think it`s silly. If he was going to do me he could have done me, but he didn`t. That didn`t phase me one bit. `You live with straights`. Yeah, so what? Half the f-king world`s straight; I don`t wanna be surrounded by hobnailed boots. I quite like some straight people, I`ve got straight babies. `The only thing you did was Yesterday`. That doesn`t bother me. Even if that was the only thing I did, that`s not bad, that`ll do me. But it isn`t, and he bloody knows it isn`t because he`s sat in this very room and watched me do tapes, and he`s dug it.”
But back to Wings. There`s Paul, and there`s Linda, and Denny Laine, and drummer Denny Seiwell who Paul found in New York before he did “Ram”. He was auditioning drummers in a dark basement, and he asked for rock and roll beat. Denny went straight to his tom toms – all the others went to the high hat. Denny got the gig. “I play all the lead guitar on the album,” said Paul, “except for a few places where Denny (Laine) and I play in harmony. I fancy myself as a guitarist, see. He did have a solo but I took it off him.” Denny smiled.

INNOCENCE

Linda sings, writes with Paul, and plays a lot of keyboards. “I like what she does. Her style isn`t like that old, hard pro thing that`s got all the technique, but it`s like children`s drawings. That`s not a very good simile, but it`s got what children`s drawings have got… innocence.”
The album was recorded with very little rehearsal, and a lot of the basic tracks were done live in the studio – a far cry from the painstaking technical methods of something like “Ram”. Why hadn`t he done something like this before?
“Well in a way I did, but it was me playing all the instruments, and you can`t get into it in the same way. `McCartney` was more or less me testing out the studio in the house – the kids in the back, Linda cooking dinner, and me sitting down and having a play. That was just that album, and then “Ram” was just the next album. But whereas with `Ram` I tried so hard that I really wanted people to like it, with this one I don`t care so much because I like it.”
How important was it to him that people like reviewers liked his work generally? “It was a little too important to me, but obviously I hope people will like what I do, so it gets to me. With this one it might get to me a bit if it gets shitty reviews but I don`t think it`ll get to me so much. I had to rationalise things after `Ram`.”
Wings have made an album, but the idea has been to form a group – a group that won`t just make records but that`ll play together a lot, and go on the road.
“We don`t know exactly how we`re going to do that yet, except that we know we`re going to do it quietly until the band`s got the confidence to know we can play anywhere. But I don`t want to start with a big `Wings at the Albert Hall!` thing, with all the Press and business people there. The basic idea is for us to turn up at a place that we just fancy visiting at the time, and try to arrange a little gig. Do it under another name or something. If we do it the other way, then we`ve got to be THEM, and do the whole bit, and when it comes to the night we just might not fancy playing anyway.
“My best playing days were at the Cavern, lunchtime sessions, when you`d just go on stage with a cheese roll and a coke and a ciggie, and people would give you a few requests, and you`d sing them in between eating your cheese roll. That was great to me, I think we got something great going in those days – we really got a rapport there, which we never got again with an audience. And if an amp blew up or something, it didn`t matter, because we`d just pick up an acoustic and sing the Sunblest commercial or something – and they`d all join in.

NERVES

We used to do skits and things too – I used to do one on Jet Harris, stagger around looking moody and a bit drunk, playing “Diamonds”. He`d been to the Cavern once and fallen off the stage.
“That was the stage with the Beatles I thought was best, and that`s the way I`d like to be able to play again – if a few people happen to turn up to a gig then it`s usually great, but if you`re all sitting there like penguins waiting to judge me, then I`m going to be nervous, and I`m not going to enjoy it. I`m not like John, who swallows his nerves in Toronto and be sick just before he goes on – that I`m not going to go through thank you. It`s not necessary, and if it`s not necessary, I`m not going to do it.
“With this band we play good together live because nobody`s too hung up about what he`s playing. We`ll go round to Denny`s house and just sit there playing songs that we half-know. It`s good.
“We don`t want to be a media group – we don`t want to go everywhere and plug everything and have knickers with our name on them and all that. That won`t work for me now – it`s all done. It was great while it lasted but its over now.”

LOOSE

Did he really enjoy all that while it was happening?
“Yeah, it was great, obviously, and I did enjoy it, loved it, but it got to be a bit tight at the end. It was when we got to be Beatles with a big B that things began to be difficult because even if we wanted to go out and play, how the hell could we do it? We`d have had to have done a big million seater thing, and that`s why I was suggesting them that we all just go away somewhere and play, like I want to do with Wings. Ricky and the Redstreaks at Slough Town Hall or something – and everyone turns up for the Saturday night dance and finds it`s us.
“We`re all musicians, and the fun of being a musician is being able to play live to people. For us, it might be a year, it might be two years, or it might be next week. We don`t know, we might not even fancy going live in the end, and if that happens it`s all right too.
“I`m just trying to keep things loose, because life itself is loose. I don`t want to have to say `I`ll be in Slough tomorrow` on the way I feel today, because tomorrow I might not feel like it, and it`s great to be able to give yourself the evening off. Everybody talks about freedom and all that, but all you`ve got to do to have it is just to take it. You don`t have to do a Santana and tour the world or something – I`d rather have a few people annoyed that we didn`t turn up, or rather that Ricky and the Redstreaks didn`t turn up, than go through all that again. And as long as we keep that basic freedom, I don`t think we`ll go far wrong.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ray Charles, Marc Bolan, Bell & Arc, Ornette Coleman, Rory Gallagher, The Who, Felix Pappalardi, Van Morrison, Mr. Fox.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Roger Daltrey FROM SOUNDS, November 20, 1971

This is in my mind a very early article with the Who, but at this point in their career they had already released five studio albums. There would be five more before they officially disbanded at the end of 1983. Later on they reformed several times, and even released a new studio album in 2006, and have been touring the world ever since.
I don`t know if we will ever see a new studio album from them, but with two original members left of their original line-up, they are still a band worth seeing. Go catch them if you can!

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Daltrey`s Utopia in the wilds of Sussex

Penny Valentine talks to the world`s greatest mike thrower, Roger Daltrey

The world`s greatest mike thrower is feeding his horses – jeans tucked into boots, polo neck sweater, his hair blown in the cold autumn wind, a bucket in either hand. Looking as though he never does anything else.
To the cynical eye the scene wouldn`t look out of place in a smooth cigarette commercial, but in truth this is the easy relaxed life of Roger Daltrey for about five months of the hectic year.
Three or four years back Roger Daltrey wasn`t the sort of man you spent a cosy weekend with in the country. A city boy with an uneven temperament, he was known to be moody, explosive, subject to fits of depression. It made you feel ill at ease to be too long in the same room with him, and he had a way of fixing you with a baleful stare that would ice up the courage of the bravest man. Hence journalists, never known for their courage in the face of adversity, would steer away from him and it was rare that interviews with Daltrey would ever see the light of day.

NUTTY ONE

There was even something of a driving ambition in him then that was a lingering throwback from the very early Who days. In fact his personality appeared to be an embodiment of the Who that the public viewed on stage. Moon was always the nutty one. Townshend looked fiercer than he ever was, but it was Daltrey who wrapped up all the aggression and spit within his own character – a phenomena that caught fire directly the band set foot on stage in those days when the Marquee was specifically their breeding ground and home.
Today the problems that he fought so hard against then no longer exist – eradicated not only by his own hand and through a sense of financial security, but one feels more because at last he feels he belongs. He belongs in fact to the Who and that the set-up is not only incredibly successful but so stalwart a unit has given him a sense of personal security.
So that talking to him in front of a blazing log fire in his Sussex house, drinking tea before we go off to feed the animals, you realise he finds it almost impossible to talk in specific terms about himself. Everything he mentions is in general or part and parcel of the group. He says it`s because he doesn`t really think he`s of particular interest, and certainly the early ambition and the need to desperately rate attention and be up front has gone forever.

PEACE

Now his striving is only to be a better singer, not for himself, but the constant advancement of the band he loves:
“I don`t think I`ve ever been a really ambitious person in the sense of the word. Of course I`m always striving to be a better singer – I mean in the Marquee days I was bloody awful. Dreadful. I don`t know whether people noticed, I don`t know whether they notice now, but I know that really that`s what`s important to me.
“I think the Who as a group are important. I mean everyone is a good musician but I don`t think individually we`re that brilliant. If Pete or Keith left they`d only be half as good as they are with the Who.”
We talk about his new found peace and security, how at one time he might have headed a band of his own (“Oh, only in the early days when I was really out front with the Who certainly not any more. If anything happened to the band I`d get out for good.”) Earlier he`d proudly shown me round his beautiful Elizabethan house he bought six months ago just because he couldn`t resist it with its acres of gardens and lakes, its rose gardens and outhouses. Now he says that sometimes a sense of guilt creeps into him to have so much – in many ways an obvious reaction from a man who once only saw his own corner of life and never really viewed the world at large:
“I`m very very happy now but sometimes I wish I wasn`t quite so materialistic. I mean I have got that way and it worries me. I look round here and think what I`ve got and how little other people have.”
I point out that it`s the society we live in and that most of the people who accuse people of being materialistic are the ones who haven`t got anything to lose. “I suppose so,” he says thoughtfully. “Maybe it`s easier to give the world away when you`ve nothing to give.” But he falls quiet for a while and we have tea in near silence.

ROTTEN

In fact Daltrey has tried harder than most musicians to actually do something concrete to help others less fortunate than himself. There have been artists he`s taken in and tried to help and invariably become disillusioned with.
But it doesn`t stop him trying. He has an overwhelming concern for the under-dog, for the ill treated which manifests itself most in his attitude to animals. His horses were all rescued from the meat axe, and amongst the seven dogs that run rampant throughout the house one was left uncaringly by the previous owners. Crippled by rheumatism, Daltrey spent unsparingly on it to bring it back to health.
“People can be rotten miserable sods can`t they? Fancy just abandoning an animal like that. I often wish I could do more but I`ve really been kicked in the teeth lately and – well it puts you off for a while.
“There`s some very talented people around and I`ve thought that if I took their material worries away from them they might get on and do something about their work. So I`ve given them a roof and money and some good grub in their stomachs and you know what – they`ve just sat on their backsides for six months and done nothing. I can`t understand that, it beats me to be honest. I mean where do you go from there?”
Daltrey`s admiration for extremely talented people has always existed. He may have no aspirations of his own but his enthusiasm for others is boundless. It`s always been noticeable that he`s never written any Who tracks and the reason is basically that he feels Townshend is so brilliant an artist that it`s just not worth bothering about, anyway – he grins – he couldn`t write a song to save his life.

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When I last saw him a year ago he said that he thought the Who were finally established but that they still had a lot to do and a long way to go – does he feel they`ve achieved more in the past year?
“Well we`re still here and that in itself is something these days. We must be one of the few bands around that`s working all the time. I think we`ve progressed and I think that the last album helped a lot, it made a breakthrough for us if you like. I think the one sad thing about the last 12 months is that the Who film – yeah the ruddy Who film that everyone did so much talking about – never got off the ground. But we learnt from that.
“I mean basically it just wasn`t right that Pete should have had all that responsibility, it should have been put into the hands of someone who knew about the process of film making. Pete would be the first to agree with that. As it was he was left to do it practically alone. I mean, okay we all had our heads with him and the script was very good, but I think it was pretty obvious it wasn`t going to work.
“We are going to do a film though – a new one Pete`s got called `Guitar Farm` which Nick Cohn is going to write for us. He`s coming with us to the States and live with the Who first hand and then come back and lock himself up in a thought machine and get it going.”
The American tour kicks off in just over a week`s time and Daltrey grimaces at the thought:
“Not because of the gigs – for the two hours the Who are on stage it`s marvellous. It`s the other 22 hours in the States that are so bloody awful. I`m hoping this time over, which is the last time for a while because really we need a rest to get other things off the ground, `Won`t Get Fooled Again` will have broken new ground for us in America. You know last time we finally managed to drop `Summertime Blues` out of the act at long last. But we had to bring it back in because American audiences wouldn`t let us off stage until we`d played it.”
His constant references to “Won`t Get Fooled Again” pin-point how important he feels that album has been to the Who. As a band who have clung on in the meanest time and surfaced through musical trends galore to re-emerge bright and beautiful he thinks, he says, that album has been a landmark in their career:

DRAG

“It was certainly the best produced album we`ve ever done and you see it was good for us to work with other musicians for once. People like Nicky Hopkins, Dave Arbus and Leslie West are so good and it sparked something off within the band. Because Leslie played lead guitar it meant Pete could give himself more room and really come up with some incredible things. It lifted a lot of weight from his shoulders and gave him more freedom which he`s never had before.
“To be honest I think it was the first album we really enjoyed working on too – all the others turned out to be such a huge drag. We only just managed to get through `Tommy` without leaping out of the window. Yes, I agree, maybe the album did lack something that`s always been connected with the Who maybe on reflection it lacked pure ballads. But it`s given us the chance to get back to that or move on or incorporate the two, it`s given us the chance of progression which is the main thing.”

WILDS

When the US tour and all the hassles it entails is over Daltrey will be back to Sussex and all the things he loves – his American wife Ev and the chance to see his seven-year-old son by his former marriage, Simon, who is here this weekend. It`s a schizophrenic kind of life prevalent amongst most top musicians these days who, once they can afford to seem to scurry off to the wilds. Daltrey says he thinks that really it gives you a much better balance in life to split your existence in this way:
“I live here because I love it and because it`s the balance to the life I lead the rest of the time. I love touring and I love gigs with the Who, but I love being quiet and away from everything here too. I think, yes, it could be dangerous to just have this – I think you could get very stale. You`d stagnate after a while and feel you`d lost touch with reality. But in the same way it would be dangerous to live in the atmosphere I work in all the time and never have a sense of release.
“You see this way you get the best of both worlds and the addition of a good outlook. I can sit here and see what life was like two hundred years ago or more and I can go back into the city and see what`s happening and what`s going to happen in the future. It`s an opportunity for serious reflection.”
It`s dark by the time we get back from the horses. Too dark for Simon to sail the boat he`s just made, but Daltrey promises him a game.

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Roger Daltrey – the world`s greatest mike thrower – leading a life that is really a personal Utopia. His own man down in Sussex more perhaps than he ever is on stage however much he loves it, maybe just because up there with his fringes swinging and his body bathed in sweat and the spotlight picking out the effort in his face he is for a while frozen within an image. A human being with something to live up to and all those yards of mike cable to do it with.
“I suppose, yes, to a certain extent we`re all trapped by our images. I mean there are some nights when I just don`t feel like throwing a mike in the air, just as there are nights when Mooney doesn`t feel like throwing his sticks at someone – so we don`t. But then you`ve got to remember that audiences expect that, that`s really what they`ve come to see. And we`re not always the same – the only reason people think we are is that for some weird reason we get reviewed about every week we`re on tour. You see really we`re just a rock and roll band. That`s all.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ray Charles, Marc Bolan, Bell & Arc, Ornette Coleman, Rory Gallagher, Paul McCartney, Felix Pappalardi, Van Morrison, Mr. Fox.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.