ARTICLE ABOUT Russ Ballard FROM SOUNDS, August 17, 1974

I feel for Mr. Ballard, one of the greatest songwriters in the pop era, who never “took off” with his solo career. He deserves it more than most – just look at all those artists/bands who have covered a song that he wrote: Agnetha Fältskog, Bay City Rollers, Roger Daltrey, Kiss, Night Ranger, Rainbow, At Vance, America, Santana, Bruce Dickinson, Uriah Heep and lots, lots more….
You should definitely listen to an album of his!

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Ballad Of A Guitar Man

By Ray Telford

Way up there at the KG publicity office Russ Ballard lines up the Detroit Spinners` “I`m Coming Home”, for a second turn on a dilapidated sound system that scarcely does justice to Thom Bell`s masterful production. But even so it has Russ listening hard and he is evidently grooving on what he hears.
Earlier this year Russ announced his departure from Argent, a band who`d stuck together for four years and whose personnel had always, on the face of it, seemed indivisable. All their press interviews previously had hinted at the closeness and feeling of musical brotherhood within the group. To an outsider the policy could have read something like the band that stays together wins together and Argent were just beginning to win.
Hit singles and at least a couple of high selling albums plus a reputation for being the nicest guys seemed good enough reason for them to continue along that safe and comfortable path. A renegade in their midst was unthinkable yet here was Ballard saying he didn`t mind if there happened to be a few duff notes on his first solo album – if the overall feel was right then he was happy.
A far cry indeed from Argent`s high precision and faultless musical technology.
At this moment Russ has all but finished his album. Most of the tracks with him playing electric guitar, bass, drums and piano, are all in the can and the results he says are beyond his expectations: “After being in a band so close knit as Argent were,” he says, “and the way that everyone used to lean on each other – to come right out and do something so isolated and on my own has been an immense challenge. I always felt I could do it and as far as I`m concerned it has worked to my satisfaction.”

Whereas Argent were primarily a musical construction kit overtly concerned with the correctness and mathematics of what they were playing. Russ is trying to infuse in the new album a degree of personalised soul – a slant all his own which he eventually hopes to be recognised through.
“It`s a reaction to all I`ve been through in the past,” he tells you. “This album is just an album of songs which I hope people will remember and associate with me. This is my contribution to music, or to my kind of music, much more so than what I did with Argent. With them I was getting too involved in some ways – in ways that I knew just weren`t right for me as a musician.
“I mean, I`m not John McLaughlin and I don`t want to be playing like him. I`m not that involved in that kind of music, though I can listen to it and appreciate everything these guys are trying to do.”
Helping out on Russ`s album have been a horn section, largely made up of Gonzalez musicians, who he says have lent invaluable assistance in getting exactly what was wanted. The aim, Russ says, was to present the music with plenty of spaces.

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SATISFACTION

“There`s also strings on the album,” Russ goes on, “but they`ve been arranged in such a way that they maybe only play one extended chord at the end of a song. I`m trying to keep it from being overdone. The main thing for me is to keep it from becoming too schmaltzy. It has to be kept funky. The good thing is that all the guys who`ve been helping out have all been around a bit and if I explain to them just what I want it`s done.
“The rhythm tracks I did myself mainly because I felt I could do them to my own satisfaction. There`s been times before when I`ve said to a drummer just play it simple and straight forward and they always put in some extra fill which I didn`t want and you say `no I want it this way` and they go in again and play it the way they hear it which still isn`t what I wanted. OK so I do it myself and there`s a couple of misplaced beats but it feels right and that`s the thing that matters.”
Later this year, Russ says will see the emergence of a Russ Ballard band. The exact line-up remains fluid in his mind, though he`s aiming for bass, drums and a co-lead guitarist to enable him to switch from guitar to piano as required as a working basis.

FEELING

“Again,” Russ predicts, “it`ll be a simple thing”. It`s easy to write a piece of music which has everything going on but the hardest thing to learn is to know what to leave out. I`ve heard so many guitarists who clutter up a song simply through overplaying but I`d rather write a song with four chords in it than one with 24 chords if the one with four sounded right. It`s not something you can put into words because it has to do with feeling.
“With Argent we used to do so many overdubs to get something sounding technically correct but I`d rather it sounds human even if there are mistakes.”
Though Russ admits that recording nowadays is probably the most important selling point for a band, he also fervently believes in the power of live sets: “From a writing point of view I believe you must be on the road to come up with the real goods – for the songs to sound fresh and spontaneous etc. – but a piece of recorded music is there for ever whereas people can watch and enjoy a live gig and forget all about it in a year`s time.
“That way you have to keep proving what you`re capable of – which isn`t necessarily a bad thing.

PERFORMERS

“I think the Beatles wrote their best stuff when they were on the road. I say that because if you`re at home all the time there`s nothing to drive for. I`ve always gone for an actual performance in the music – like in some of the early Presley records there were a few duff notes but the performance was always brilliant. Again that applies to the Beatles so much – they were as much performers as they were musicians.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Tim Hardin, Joan Baez, Mike Garson, Mike Oldfield, ELO, Pink Floyd, Herbie Hancock, Queen, Wendy Waldman, Alan Stivell, Contraband.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

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ARTICLE ABOUT Status Quo FROM SOUNDS, August 10, 1974

It is very strange, but the most successful bands of all time in the UK didn`t ever really “make it” in the USA. They tried, but ultimately they had to admit failure there. Not that it mattered much, as the rest of the world clearly loved them very much. Well, it is America`s loss, and our gain. Who wouldn`t like to have these fun, loveable guys around, turning out their catchy boogie-rock? I would.

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The simple plod along Status trail

Andy McConnell reports on Quo`s progress from a pool side in Los Angeles

“We`ll plod along steadily. Things have happened to us over the years but we get over them. We keep getting knocked down, then knocked down again but we get up again. We`ll carry on and in the end we`ll look up and suddenly realise that we`ve made it,” said Francis `Mike` Rossi from beside Status Quo`s Los Angeles hotel swim pool.
The singer / guitarist / spokesman`s comment seemed to sum up his band`s simple philosophy. After ten hard years on the road in England and Europe the band have `suddenly realised` that they have made it over there. They have had a number one and a number two album and a series of top singles in England; statistics reflected all over Europe.
Now it`s the turn of the States.
“The first tour over here was good,” said Rossi in his heavy Cockney accent. “We got good reactions and we were told by everybody that things were very promising.”
Then they were `knocked down`…
“The second was a disaster. We started off at the beginning of the year with the Fleetwood Mac that wasn`t Fleetwood Mac. It was that mock-up Fleetwood. The tour started to fall to bits right from the start. People were throwing bottles at them and demanding their money back. Everybody was having rows. Then we were supposed to do some dates with Nazareth but they didn`t come over. I caught pleurisy, Richard Parfitt got something so we packed up and went home.”
Since the first tour Quo`s popularity has soared so much in England that it must be difficult for guitarists Francis and Richard, bassist Alan Lancaster and drummer John `Spud` Coghlan to come out and tour the States as second or even third on the bill.

“Yeah, it`s hard to come out here and have to start from scratch again,” the unshaven guitarist agreed. “Over here we don`t mean a thing, but in England we have reached a point where we can ask for whatever we want; each tour is bigger and better than the last one. We can have things there that we can`t over here. It`s a difficult psychological thing.”
The band had arrived in LA the night before. They had flown over from London for the start of a six week tour, opening with Rory Gallagher at Santa Monica.
Although it`s difficult to categorise bands` music, Quo`s is a sort of London 70`s R&B, I suggested.
“Yeah, that`s a nice phrase. I like that. It`s hard to say what it is but that sorta sums it up. It`s a kinda raunchy R&B. I dunno, it`s just something we get off on,” he said admiring his rapidly tanning chest.
But Quo`s music has not always been in that bag. No way.
The band knew each other from years back. They`ve been together as a four-piece for almost ten years. Francis knew Alan from the time he was 12-years-old. They found `Spud` two years later. They met second guitarist Richard in 1965.
Under the name of The Spectors they played as support band for touring solo acts in England. Anybody from the Dixie Cups to Madeline Bell, now of Blue Mink. They toured for a short while as Traffic until Stevie Winwood`s outfit of the same name broke onto the scene.
Eventually they chose Status Quo as a name. Their first single release was a weird little number, “Pictures Of Matchstick Men”.
“It got to the top five in England, number seven over `ere and higher in all sortsa places over the world. We used to think that if we ever had a hit single all our troubles would be over,” lamented Rossi with a vague smile.

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“We thought that everything would be fine; no problems, no worries, our mums and dads would stop `aving a go at us. No chance! We were told what we should wear, told what we should say, what we should play on stage. All that old crap, yer know.”
After “Matchstick Men” the States forgot about Quo. So did England, well almost. The next single flopped. Things looked bad. The third one sold well, the fourth flopped. “We really got into a rut. Our producer had a strange urge to put strings on every track we cut.” Another single bombed.
Suddenly they got hold of a song they really liked, “Down The Dustpipe”. They got themselves back in the charts.
“We found ourselves in a situation that if we played a spot on television the night before we would pack out a gig, but things would die off towards the end of the week. There were usually 20 or 30 kids upfront screaming and trying to get hold of us while the rest of the hall was silent. The blokes would be there to get women and the women were there to get men. There was no satisfaction. We`d come off and there`d be nuffing; a couple of people would clap, that`s all. They wouldn`t know what you`d done and didn`t care either.”
So they decided to make a break. Instead of playing ballrooms and dance-halls, they started playing small clubs for either nothing or just expenses. They had another single success, with a song culled from an album. One album later they waved goodbye to a recording company they had grown to hate.
It took a year of court-cases and lawsuits to free themselves before joining a new, more sympathetic company. With the experience under their belts they recorded “Piledriver”.
“We put out “Paper Plane” from that album and everything went WHAM!” said Rossi leaning across the table. “Everything just bust wide open. Since then we`d have four smash singles on the trot in England.”
With Quo`s astonishing success, the old company jumped on the band-wagon, releasing tracks from old albums as singles and putting out their own, unapproved compilation albums.

“We had “Paper Plane”, our own single in the charts there were two singles from the other company; the “Piledriver” and the new “Hello” albums were in the album charts while the other company`s “Best Of…” and Golden Hour Of…” sets were high-flying. We were trying to keep a steady flow of material and there was this other lot flooding the shop with singles and albums. It was ridiculous.”
Since then Quo have had their new “Quo” album released in England along with the single, “Break The Rules”. The single was top ten. The album?
“We knew the album would do well,” declared Rossi draining the last of his 7 Up from the bottle. “We knew it would. But it turned out to be incredible. The first week of its release it went into the charts at number two. From then it fought it out with the Carpenters and Rick Wakeman! It`s amazing.”
Why come over to the States to start again from the bottom? Surely the last album will make enough money to keep them in plenty for a year?
“You can`t stop. You just can`t say that`s enough. We could stay in England and work away, turning out album after album and saturate things. We don`t want to do that.
“You have to come over to the States; it`s a natural thing to do. Richard said the other day `when you are in a race and you are half-a-mile in front of everybody else, you don`t stop, you keep going`. That`s what we are doing.”
What`s happening after this six-week trip, I enquired.
“We go home and try to get some things down for the new album which should be out early next year. Then we`ve got four days off, off to Sweden, Denmark and Norway then come back over here again in October,” answered Rossi.
Back to the States again? Four tours in 18 months?
“I think so. If we are really going to make a go of the States I want to do it now, not spread it over five years, coz we`ll be a bit old by then. We`ll all be 21,” he smiled with a twinkle in his eye.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Marley, Billy Preston, Ronnie Lane, Golden Earring, Ronnie Spector, Duane Eddy, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Andy Fairweather Low, Viola Wills, Mick Jagger, Suzi Quatro, R. Dean Taylor, Johnny Bristol, Julie Driscoll, Argent, Georgia Fame, Vangelis, Greenslade.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Suzi Quatro FROM SOUNDS, August 10, 1974

When you think of rock in the early 70s, it is impossible not to think of little Suzi. She, along with some hit songs delivered by the mighty songwriting duo Chinn and Chapman, made real impact into the charts of that time and a lot of those songs are great to listen to even today.

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Going along with the crowd

Interview by Steve Peacock

Self-assured? She seems it. Arrogant? Sometimes. Complacent? She seems it. Together? Apparently so. Successful? What do you think?
Suzi Quatro has, in her own words, carved out her niche as a hit act and it`s giving her plenty of work and plenty of hits. That`s what she wanted, and what she`s doing now is keeping on keeping on: “After the initial rush of getting to number one with “Can The Can” – and I waited ten years for that – getting better is the rush now. Writing a better song, doing a better record, doing a better show…”
And getting a hit in her homeland. While we were talking, someone came in to tell her the new single was 74 with a bullet over there. “Just cut that out and send it to my sisters, will you?” When we`d finished talking she was still thinking about it. “74 with a bullet… hey, that`s great.”
Ten years ago Suzi Quatro started her career in America, in all girl groups. After six or so years Mickie Most asked her to come over here to record, it took them a while to sort out what they were going to do, and then… “Can The Can”. Hits have given her work, and work is what she`s doing. She`s just come back from Germany, America and Australia, next week she`s off again to Italy, America, Scandinavia, Japan, Australia, Germany, Britain – and then it`s Christmas.
When she first came over: “I was getting to know what I was all about and Mickey was getting to know what I was all about, so it took time. I had a lot of growing up to do. You`re in your own environment, and you think you`re great, then someone takes you out of your environment and you find you haven`t got any legs any more. Your lose the silly ego and just keep the stuff that really means something. You learn that just because you`re American doesn`t mean you`re any better than anybody else. America`s so different from anywhere else, and now that I`m away I can see why it is so different. We grow up very fast there. You either love America or you hate it: I think now it`s the greatest place in the world to play music, but I live here. If the taxman`s all right.”

The all-girl band thing… “It didn`t ever make any difference to me whether I played with boys or girls, then when I got this band I realised that I get along one hundred percent better with men musicians.”
It always seemed just as silly to me to insist as dogma on having all women and all men: the only possible reason being gimmick. “It is, but when we first started, we just wanted to prove something. People are telling you all the time you can`t do something so you get a bunch of strong-headed girls and they go right ahead and do it. Then when you get a little bit older you see it doesn`t make any difference.”
From relatively nowhere to number one: did she and Mickey have a Masterplan? “We`ve had one major plan that`s stuck right through our association, which was he said he liked something in me that was a natural thing and I said great, don`t ever change it, and he said he`d never change it and that was our thing. A man that`s smart enough to see the natural talent instead of trying to create something… that`s what`s so great about Mickey. He directed me and brought out what he saw as important things, but they were… well, what I am I suppose.
“I always used to wear, well not the leather jeans because I couldn`t afford it, but a leather jacket. I haven`t changed – a little bit sleeker maybe, but that`s what you do when you make it, don`t you? You dress up a little bit more. If you`re just walking about the streets they`re not paying to see you walk about the streets, if you  do a show they want to see a little bit more.”
And material? Hits from the Chinnichap factory? “We were having a really hard time trying to write a hit single. We asked Nicky and Mike to write us a song, and they came down and listened to everything we`d done, went away and came back with “Can The Can”, which I still think is one of our best ones. It worked well, they do our singles. I don`t know what they`re like with their other acts, but Mickey – because he`s got a personal interest in this act – would never let anything go out that was more a Chinnichap song then a Suzi Quatro song. The two singles I thought weren`t really us were the two that didn`t make it so much, which just goes to show that if it ain`t us it ain`t gonna make it. People aren`t as stupid as journalists say they are – very few phoney songs get up there. I think the public know a true song when they hear it.”

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A niche: she says she`s found that, and that she won`t put out some things she`s recorded because they`re too far ahead for her audience. “When you`re on the road you progress so fast that if you put out a track – like “Angel Flight” which is 10 1/2 minutes long with strings and all – everybody would be so confused. There`s a danger of progressing too far ahead in too short a time.”
Talk about journalists insulting people – how does Suzi Quatro know that a 10-minute track with strings is too far ahead for her public? “No, the kids are buying you because you put out something that they like, you got a certain sound, so because on a night on the road you might have written something ten years ahead of time, it`s not fair to put it out and confuse them. You`re living a life on the road, they`re not: they`re still at home with their record players and their radios. If I was a kid and I heard that coming from me I`d throw it down the trash can because I wouldn`t understand it. I don`t put myself above – I just live a different life, living it faster than what they`re hearing. We`re four singles and one album old to those people.
“Listen, I`ve been in the business a long time, and you`ve got to be smart enough to know… well, Mickey`s the smart one because he noticed it before we did, because you`ve still got your egos to deal with and you think whatever you do is great. He pointed out that it was too far ahead. We all listen to different kinds of music when we`re home, but when we come together on stage we play one kind of music, and that`s what we`re known for. That`s what we do.”
You don`t find it restrictive? “No. You gotta progress but you gotta do it slowly. You gotta play it cool – look at it as if you were a fan, not a musician, go along with the crowd, nothing to upset them.”

Good for a career I`m sure, but for a musician? “If I did just what a musician thinks I`d been down in a bar in Nashville somewhere singing Billie Holiday songs. And that wouldn`t get me anywhere would it? You ask any musician who`s successful, and I bet they`d tell you if it wasn`t down to that they wanted to have a successful career they`d be doing something entirely different. It`s a stupid artist that pretends they`re in it just for creativity, because it`s a job as well. Don`t you give me that peace/love bullshit.”
I wasn`t going to. But there`s a way of striking a balance. Did she find that a problem? “No I don`t. I`ve been doing this so long that I find it quite easy to look at it as a business and still keep quite happy on the creative side. If I was to die off tomorrow I`d definitely go down to some little bar and sing and get drunk every night – actually it wouldn`t be so different to what I do now, only I wouldn`t be making any money.”
She`d said earlier about roadwork, you go where your work takes you. Does she enjoy it? “I`m a nutcase about it. One day at home and I`m absolutely dying to get back on the road. I like on the road better than off the road because off the road`s boring – you get drunk or try to give yourself a false buzz somehow. Suburban ech, I hate it.”
Surely life on the road is also a false buzz. “Sure – I know it`s a fantasy but I enjoy it and I give other people enjoyment doing it. When Mick Jagger stops I`ll wait till a year after he stops and then I will. Give the next person a chance.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Marley, Billy Preston, Ronnie Lane, Golden Earring, Ronnie Spector, Duane Eddy, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Andy Fairweather Low, Viola Wills, Mick Jagger, Argent, R. Dean Taylor, Johnny Bristol, Julie Driscoll, Status Quo, Georgia Fame, Vangelis, Greenslade.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Lynyrd Skynyrd FROM SOUNDS, August 10, 1974

I think I have seen somewhere that this particular article is one of those that fans of this band sees as one of the most pivotal in the band`s history. Well, I can sort of understand why. So here it is in all its glory.

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Skynyrd singe God`s beard in Memphis

Down in Memphis Lynyrd Skynyrd are hot property. Their recent gig at the Memorial Stadium was supporting their idol Eric Clapton on the last leg of his American tour and they made it tough for the guitar God. But, Clapton produced one of the best gigs he`s played to date and Sharon Lawrence was there to report on the fireworks.

This is a story about a steamy, hot, lazy Sunday afternoon in Memphis, Tennessee, and what happened when blues master Eric Clapton met up with an authentic, young Southern band named Lynyrd Skynyrd, the same Lynyrd Skynyrd who learned more than a few of their tricks from Eric Clapton records and a live Clapton gig or two when Skynyrd were punk kids playing for a few bucks a night and virtually starving, and Eric Clapton was God.

UNFURLED

Lynyrd Skynyrd are simply loved to death in Memphis, Tennessee. They were specifically put on the Clapton bill by promoters who weren`t quite sure how the “new” Eric Clapton would draw. Ross was the first act onstage, then Foghat. Ho hum.
Then the stirring strains of “Dixie” and the big Confederate flag behind Skynyrd`s drum kit was unfurled and the seven men of Lynyrd Skynyrd hit the stage and the tens of thousands of people who almost filled the big Memphis Memorial Stadium went wild.
Skynyrd are their boys, Southern boys whose most ingratiating ingredient is a certain strong spirit that encompasses pride, freedom and brotherhood. You can love `em even when the sound system is failing, and you can`t quite make out those three glorious lead guitars.

THRILLING

Masses of people bunched together sweating in the hot sun and loving every minute of it… thousands of hands raised in applause to the skies. It was a thrilling sight, what the best of rock is all about, what all those hyped-up festivals seldom really are.
“You stop that fighting,” said Ronnie Van Zant, Skynyrd`s lead singer. “You stop it right now!” Ronnie Van Zant commands his stage like a field marshal and two spaced-out people in the audience trying to kill each other are simply not going to be allowed to succeed if Ronnie Van Zant has anything to say about it.
Ronnie Van Zant likes to talk, especially if he`s had his whisky. And he`s an eloquent talker. Ronnie Van Zant is often someone well worth listening to, and as he introduced that Skynyrd stunner “Free Bird”, the audience listened well.

DEPOSIT

“Three years ago my band and me collected enough Coke bottles to turn them in for the deposit money we needed to get down to Miami to see Derek and the Dominoes. Eric Clapton was one of our idols. And we`re happy we`re playing with him today. It`s a thrill.
“But now we`re doing a song for a hero who can`t be here today. Put your hands together for Duane Allman.”
Eric Clapton had his hands full following Lynyrd Skynyrd, and he was well aware of it. People in the Clapton camp had been quietly talking about Skynyrd for several days before the Memphis gig. “Eric is up for Memphis,” was the word. His reputation was on the line, especially in Memphis, one of the homes of the blues.
Some of the Clapton band watched Skynyrd devastate the audience with “Free Bird”, then encore with “Sweet Home Alabama”, their first hit single currently climbing the American charts. The Clapton people seemed to like Skynyrd and they were impressed by the reception the band was given. Eric stayed in the dressing room.
A few minutes later, Eric, his face looking pale, and drinking a tall Vodka and orange, received Skynyrd in his dressing room for a few minutes. The Skynyrd boys were nervous and excited. Eric was gracious.
God knows it must have been a strange feeling to be with people with all that fresh young energy who had learned their craft listening to his songs and who do a version of “Crossroads” that`s a killer.
Then, Ronnie Van Zant, feeling his whisky and never ashamed to speak his mind, started talking about Duane Allman. It made Eric nervous. Finally he nodded when Ronnie kept insisting, “You go out there and play for Duane.”

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Clapton, as they say, did good, even after starting out with that diabetes-inducer “Smile”. Eric`s set built in momentum and bass player Carl Radle, the unsung hero of the Clapton tour, and the drummer Jamie Oldake kept it cooking. The audience liked all those reggae riffs Eric seems to be into these days, but they most liked “Badge”, “Crossroads” and “Blues Power”.
Lynyrd Skynyrd were up at the back of the stage watching intently. Eric had damn well better be playing for Duane.
Skynyrd kicked Clapton`s ass and one had the feeling that after the gig in the back of his mind, he was grateful. It was one of the best dates on his American tour. He was on the spot to deliver.
Look at Eric Clapton and you see where rock has been. Look at a band like Skynyrd and you pray this is where rock is going. The arrogant, frightening, English guys who surround people like Eric Clapton don`t seem to be interested in the music. Their pleasure comes from throwing people bodily off the stage for no apparent reason as often as possible.
Lynyrd Skynyrd know who their friends are. They have a crew who would and have worked for free when the band was starving. As Ronnie Van Zant says, “We`re the real brothers of the South.”
Van Zant`s not bragging, simply stating a fact.
“We`ve gone through hell for seven years. We love each other and we`re not ashamed to say it. We know who we are and who we play for. I couldn`t work without our roadies. They couldn`t work without me.
“The sharks are moving in on us, but we`ll fool `em. Pressure us too much and we`ll go back to the swamp and wait it out. And if it takes us three years of starving we`ll be back. And we`ll be better than we ever were. But we won`t be bought and sold like pieces of meat.

DIFFERENCE

“And we won`t have people around us who are greedy and who don`t care about human beings.
“We`re Southern rebels but more than that, we know the difference between right and wrong.”
Skynyrd learned plenty from Eric Clapton a few years ago. He could learn from them now.
The day after the concert the two leading Memphis papers declared Lynyrd Skynyrd to be the champion of the Sunday gig. Lynyrd Skynyrd had delivered for the audience was the gist of the reviews Skynyrd were thrilled with those reviews. But they`d be more than happy to play with their friend Eric Clapton again and let him blow them off the stage.
That`s the kind of Southern boys Lynyrd Skynyrd are.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Marley, Billy Preston, Ronnie Lane, Golden Earring, Ronnie Spector, Duane Eddy, Argent, Andy Fairweather Low, Viola Wills, Mick Jagger, Suzi Quatro, R. Dean Taylor, Johnny Bristol, Julie Driscoll, Status Quo, Georgia Fame, Vangelis, Greenslade.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT Golden Earring FROM SOUNDS, August 10, 1974

One thing is for certain, when Geoff Barton, now a veteran of the English music press, interviews someone, you will always get a good article. No matter who he writes about, no matter the decade, you can always rely on Mr. Barton to deliver the goods. It is no coincidence that this man is a music writing legend. So sit back, relax and enjoy!

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Up and down absurdia

Geoff `Kid` Barton talks to Earring`s Barry Hay

Since the success of “Radar Love” and “Moontan”, Golden Earring fever has died down appreciably in this country. The follow-up to the hit single, “Instant Poetry”, was, by the band`s own admittance, a “big flop” – and we`ve hardly heard from the Dutchmen since. So what`s happening on the Earring scene now, hmm?
Well, singer Barry Hay tells me that the band have just returned from a pretty extensive tour of the States. Apparently they were over in America for three months, and played almost a date a day.
I had a chat to Barry in Track Records` basement studio. He`s got, like most of the Dutch I suppose, a great command of the English language – and he speaks with a slight American intonation. In fact, if you didn`t know otherwise, you could well think that he was an American, through and through.
Anyway, how was the tour, Barry? Pretty exhausting?
“No, it wasn`t that bad. We travelled under very nice conditions, and we were well taken care of. If it`s like  that, then it`s not very tiring. All in all, it took me about two days to recover, and that`s not bad. But we went dowBelieven very well, and the success was stimulating. The last news I heard was that `Moontan` is going to be a gold album soon. Now that`s overwhelming.”
Barry is none too modest about the tour, and the huge area it covered: “There are bands in the States that do great in the South – but people have never heard of them in the North. But we did every market. We tried them all out. We went down to Florida, and we went all through the South. We did everything.”
Did you find that the American audiences were any different from European ones?
“I think for every band it`s different. But they are different. Let`s say that they`re a lot crazier – in every way. They`re just crazy kids. They just want to come out and have a good time. They`re very wild.

“The audiences we had in England would sit through a whole set, or maybe just get up towards the end. But in the States they just leap up. If it starts right – then they`re up, and they never sit down. But at the same time they`re people, so they`re not really that different.”
This was not the first time that Earring have visited America. The first time was some five years ago.
“We went there just to check it out. At that time we didn`t want to stay in Holland, and we were listening to a lot of music that was coming out of the States at that time. So, we went over, and lost quite a lot of money. We went back a year later, but that was too soon. We decided first to play around in Europe – because the costs are murderous in the States. If you haven`t got a product to back you up, then you`re done for.
“We decided to go back the right way, with an album and a single, and then we would stand a chance. And it took us about four years to get that together – which isn`t bad.”
What sort of venues did you play in the States?
“They were pretty big. We started off as a supporting act, but news spread pretty fast. Soon we stepped up to guest act – which has more prestige. Towards the end we did about ten headliners.”
Now that Earring are finally back in Europe, they are going to record an album for a month, only to return to the States in October. In November they will tour Britain. But have they sold out? Not only do they seem to be neglecting Britain – touring Holland seems just about the furthest thing from their minds.
“Of course people think that we`re selling out. It`s human nature. But there`s very little we can do about it. The States is a very important country, a very important market. We just have to get back to the States, now that the word is around about us. It`s really necessary for us to be there.”

But don`t you think you should consolidate the British market before touring elsewhere?
“Hmm. Yeah. I don`t have the feeling that we are established in Britain. No, I don`t think so. I mean `Instant Poetry` was a failure here. But America is different. American kids are very loyal. They`ll go out and buy your new album even if they haven`t heard it. They`ll buy the new one simply because they`ve got the previous one. In the States you`ve got an AM and FM market. Here, you`re just stuck with one market, and the kids forget so soon.”
Believe it or not, “Moontan” was recorded one and a half years ago, so I doubt if the album represents Earring as they are today. It seems as if the new, soon to be recorded, album is going to be something different. Certainly, Barry enthused about it.
“We`ve got some really nice ideas for it, and I`m really happy with them. It`s very much a progression from `Moontan`. The band has been through so much since that album was recorded. Yeah. It`ll be a huge progression in every way. Everyone in the band has developed as a human being, and the musicians in the band have really progressed. George Kooymans has become really paranoid about his guitar playing. He`s really quite good now. We`ve reached a satisfactory standard.”
I thought that audiences might have got a little tired of the much-vaunted drum-leaping stunt the band are famous for. But, apparently not. Barry said that they are going to develop it into “something more amazing” – I just can`t wait. Meanwhile, I wondered if Barry would accept the comment that the band are a cross between Deep Purple and Yes. As it turned out, he wouldn`t.
“Oh no, no. I don`t really like that. No, not at all. They`re into an entirely different trip than we are. I think both of those bands are very serious, while we are half serious, and half something else.”

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But I think what brought rise to that comment was the fact that the hit single and the “Moontan” album were so different. After all, the single was a bit removed from the music you normally play, wasn`t it?
“Not really. I don`t think there is such a thing as the normal stuff as far as we`re concerned. We always treat each of our songs differently. We`ve always thought of a song as a song, and if it`s the same as the others, then okay. But it`ll more than likely be different. That`s the way it goes.”
Despite the world-wide success of “Radar Love” as a single, the band consider themselves to be an album-orientated band.
“It took us such a long time to get out of the singles thing. In Holland we were forced to bring out singles, and there you have to come out with a product all the time, because it`s such a small country. So, in the beginning we were a singles band, and we really got dissatisfied with it all. Eventually we got rid of that image in Holland, and we`d hate to have the whole thing happening again. Don`t get me wrong, I can see the importance of singles very much. But we are not going to keep churning out singles.”
But isn`t that what you did with “Instant Poetry”? It followed very swiftly on the heels of the other one.
“Yes, I suppose so. But it`s not going to happen again.”
To me, and to a lot of people, the lyrics on “Moontan” were a bit stilted. They tried to be Bolanesque if you like – but they didn`t succeed. They just fell flat. Listen to the words on “Vanilla Queen”, if you have the album. It`s hard to take them seriously. I raised this point with Barry.
“Stilted? Yes, it could be. But on the new album we are going to use French lines, and even have a Dutch song. Oh, I don`t care. As long as I like them, it`s all right.
“I`ll agree with anyone who says it`s not poetry – that`s fair enough. But I wasn`t trying to be far out. Maybe it`s a bit kinky, I don`t know.”

What about the critics who say Golden Earring haven`t got much original style?
“What do they expect? We`re not innovators. No way. Look, I`d like to know who is original. You just name me someone who is doing something original. What is originality? Everything repeats itself, anyway.”
But as it turns out, the new album from the band sounds quite original. Barry says that it`s going to be “food for people who like to get into things”. At the moment the album`s working title is “Up And Down Absurdia”, would you believe. From what I could gather, it is loosely a concept thing. It`s about how different people look at things in different ways – how one person can find, say, a piece of abstract art particularly beautiful, while another can see only ugliness in it. That`s quite a concept, hey? It will be interesting to see if the band can get it across musically.
“The album cover will be into very much the same idea,” says Barry. “The outside cover will just be plain, with some glue on it. Inside there will be several sheets to stick on it, so you can choose the cover which you want. It`s going to be amazing seeing all the record shops displaying different covers, when they`re the same album. You can choose the cover you want. That is `Up And Down Absurdia`.”
You may have noticed that Earring were due to appear at Wakeman`s recent outdoor extravaganza, but for some reason they pulled out. If the band had appeared, the concert would have been an even more spectacular affair. So why didn`t the band play at the Palace?
“Well we really didn`t feel up to it at all. We just weren`t ready for it. You see, we wanted to come over to England and do a really good job – but when we had finished the tour of the States we thought, well, that`s the end of a period. We wanted to stop it there, get ourselves together, and come back to England when we felt ready.
“When we tour in November we`ll be fresh. I only hope that when we record the album we come up with a single that we`ll be able to release to coincide with the tour.
“If we don`t come up with something, we`ll have to pull a stunt. Probably steal the Tower of London or something.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Bob Marley, Billy Preston, Ronnie Lane, Argent, Ronnie Spector, Duane Eddy, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Andy Fairweather Low, Viola Wills, Mick Jagger, Suzi Quatro, R. Dean Taylor, Johnny Bristol, Julie Driscoll, Status Quo, Georgia Fame, Vangelis, Greenslade.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.