Month: May 2018

ARTICLE ABOUT Nick Mason (Pink Floyd) FROM SOUNDS, October 28, 1972

It is very fascinating to read this interview with a very down to earth man who would soon become one of the most successful musicians in the known universe through what would become one of history`s most beloved albums ever. The style of this interview is also “different” as it looks more like an conversation between two friends than a series of questions.
All in all, this is a great read.

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Nick Mason in the talk-in

Interview by Steve Peacock

First it was called “Dark Side of The Moon”, then they discovered that Medicine Head had an album out under that name so they changed it to “Eclipse”. But by now it has taken – not unusually – a lot longer to record than they`d anticipated, and the Medicine Head album is long past, so the Pink Floyd have changed the title of their next album back to the original.
Also not unusually, Nick Mason confessed that there wasn`t really much to say about the album at this stage – they`re just grinding away at it, translating the piece from stage performance terms into studio terms.
What is unusual though, is that they`ve been performing the album live for some time before they recorded it.

Is this the first time you`ve worked this way round? You normally get something together in the studio, and then take it out on the road.

Right, that`s what we normally do. With “Atom Heart Mother” we had the piece a little before we recorded it and worked on it a little bit, but this was definitely a major change in terms of technique for us – normally we get into the studio and stagger about for days wondering what to put down. I think this is a better way of doing it, because you spend more time making a good record.
And also usually even if you use a late take when you`re recording, the tenth take or something, by the time you`ve taken it out on the road for a few months you`re starting to regret the way you handled it on the album.

That seems obvious for a fairly straightforward rock and roll band, but I wouldn`t have thought it necessarily applied to the Pink Floyd.

Well it doesn`t apply to everything – some things we never perform live for a start, and some things have a different quality in the studio that gets altered. But I think “Atom Heart Mother” is a prime example of one of the things we would have liked to have started again once we`d had it on the road for a while, because that was very much a case of learning by our mistakes, the techniques of recording it were quite extraordinary.
One of the things we did on that just as a starter was that Roger and I put down the whole thing, just bass and drums, which was a crazy thing to do. We used parts of that, but basically it all got chopped up anyway so it was a totally unnecessary, amazing feat of brilliance; totally useless.

Would you say the “Dark Side Of The Moon” piece was more straightforward, and rather more a “live” concept that most of the things you`ve done in the past?

Well, it is at the moment, because it was written that way, but I think there`s a lot of scope for doing other things with it. Like we keep talking about giving ourselves more time to do things like “Dark Side Of The Moon”, to get them a lot further than that was got before it was performed – though that was the furthest we`ve got anything I think. That`s one thing, and the other thing is that we`ve only recently started to get interested and find a use for synthesisers. We`ve had one around doing odd blips and burps for quite a time, but we`ve never really used it. We did a little on “Obscured By Clouds”, and I think we`ll use them more on this piece.

SOLID

“Obscured By Clouds” was done in quite a short time, wasn`t it, and within tighter structures than you usually use? How well do you think it came out?

Sensational, actually. I thought the album was an amazing improvement on the film music, and I thought the film music was really good. But then I thought the same about “More”. It`s one of the annoying things in a way that the difference between something we`ve spent a week on and something that takes nine months isn`t that great – I mean the thing that takes nine months isn`t four times nine, 36 times as good. Obviously nine months doesn`t mean nine months solid recording, but even so…

I felt the tightness of it brought out a whole different quality in the music, and in the playing. More intense in a way.

Sure, I thought it was particularly good from that point of view, it had a good, together feel. It was a fairly relaxed album but it was… well, tight. I like that sort of short, scheme thing – it`s less disappointing in a way. Whenever we finish an album I always think it could have been better, but with things like “More” and “Obscured By Clouds” I tend to think it`s really not bad for the time – perhaps it`s just there`s more excuses.

Looking back over what you`ve done, eight or nine albums now isn`t it, can you see much that you`d originally thought were good ideas, but that you`ve now discarded?

Not much, actually. For instance we haven`t discarded the idea of orchestra and choir after “Atom Heart Mother”, if that`s what you mean, sort of “we tried it, and we don`t want to do that again”.

Not as specific as that really. More in your general approach.

There isn`t much really. We`ve made lots of mistakes, I know, but they`ve been filed under “Experience”, and there`s not much that we thought of as complete disasters that we`d never go back to. I can`t think of anything that really sticks out as a discard.

OLD AGE

The music does seem to have got less violent – says comparing “Echoes WITH “Interstellar Overdrive” or “Careful with That Axe, Eugene”. I suppose that could be just old age…

(Laughs) … creeping up, yes. I don`t know – I think the thing that bothers me more than anything is that we seem to get stuck into a slow four tempo for nearly everything we do. Like the speed of “Meddle” is the speed of nearly everything we`ve done for too long. That has something to do with it, that penchant for slow tempos, but again I think in some ways things are becoming more aggressive – there`s more aggression in the way we do “Careful With That Axe” on stage now than there ever was when we first recorded it. Our original recordings of that were extremely mild, jogalong stuff.
Even if it doesn`t always come off, there`s meant to be a lot of very heavy vibes coming off the stage during “Dark Side Of The Moon”. We`re well into putting on a lot of effect in order to make the whole thing heavy, really, in the true sense of the word. I`m not expressing that very well, but I don`t think it`s getting any lighter, put it like that: it might have got a bit slower, but I don`t think it`s getting any lighter. And I don`t think the intention is to make it light either. It`s all a bit abstract really.

Yeah. I suppose what I was really trying to get at was how you felt you`d changed over the years – moving through that UFO/Middle Earth scene up to now.

One doesn`t really feel that it has changed much because you`re in it you tend to feel you`re just the same and it`s everyone else that`s different. I think we just take for granted all kinds of things that happen to us, things like our attitude to what the show should be like.
I can`t remember exactly what we were saying in 1967, but I`m sure it was something to the effect that “there`s the light show, and we`re really incidental to the whole event; we should be in the background somewhere and we don`t approve of people rushing about the stage jumping up and down.” Ostensibly we still don`t jump up and down, but the pyrotechnics and everything on stage now are arch-showmanship really. When we were in America we did a show at the Bowl where it was only marginal whether it was us or a sort of Barnum and Bailey carnival night – fireworks, searchlights, the lot.
I suppose the real thing is that there are so many more facilities available to us now: five years ago we thought that you should do almost anything to increase the power of what you were doing, and it`s just that now the whole thing`s turned into this gigantic circus of steel machinery.

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EXPLODED

I think one fairly obvious difference is that with clubs like UFO, people came as much for the event as to see you, whereas now – despite the sound in the round and everything – they come and sit and watch the stage.

Right, because there`s all sorts of things to bring their attention to the stage, like the lighting towers and so on. I think that`s inevitable though, because apart from anything else it`s to do with the size of the place you`re playing. At UFO – now we`re really sounding like old age pensioners – but at UFO there was this kind of community feeling about it all. There were other events going on while we were playing, the light show were doing their thing as well, rather than just lighting us, and so on. But really, there`s no magic in some of the horrible places we play at now, baseball stadiums and so on, so that`s one reason why we centre a lot more on the stage. And then obviously there`s all sorts of other reasons as well – ego drive, and success…

Because the more people know your names and faces the more they want to look at you, sure. But it hasn`t changed the effect you want to have on the audience?

No, I don`t think so. I think we`re clearer now than we ever were about what we want to do – we used to have very vague aspirations. Like when we started all we were into was Top Of The Pops and a hit single, and then when we attained that, it was an amazing disappointment and very nearly exploded the band.

So how much did you feel a part of that 1967, community thing at UFO? Was it just a case of playing those places because that`s where you got gigs?

I think I played them because that`s where we were – I didn`t know what the f–k was going on. Peter and Andrew (Jenner and King of Blackhill, the Floyd`s first managers) and the kind of Joe Boyd figures that were around then were probably part of it in a way that I certainly wasn`t; all four of us – we were the band, that`s all, rather bizarre, sometimes very inward looking people who lived in a world of our own. There was no community spirit whatsoever; all we were interested in was our EMI contract, making a record, being a hit.
At UFO we felt like the house band, it was by far the nicest gig and it was what everyone asked about at interviews and so on, but I certainly wasn`t into the lifestyle of the whole thing. One knew the people one came up against of course, people like Joe Boyd and Hoppy, and once there one ran up against people that one still sees occasionally, but I don`t think I felt part of The New Movement, because I was too busy being part of the new rock and roll movement, which was a different thing.

So one day it was the Roundhouse and the next it was Sheperd`s Bush TV studios, and apart from the obvious differences it wasn`t that strange for you?

Well yes, obviously there was an amazing difference, but then you just took it in your stride. I think today I`d probably have a nervous breakdown because the two places are totally opposed, but then it just all seemed part of your life.

Would it be fair to say then that the Pink Floyd`s music has grown out of whoever`s been in the band, from the inside, rather than being a product of – whatever you care to call it – some kind of outside cultural changes in the past few years?

Basically, yes, but it isn`t quite as simple as that. The launching of it had a lot to do with Syd, his writing and his songs were what did it really because as a band we probably weren`t very good, in fact I`m sure we weren`t. That was part of it, and another part of it was Peter and Andrew – like the light show was more their idea than ours, and that was an amazing leapfrog forward because even if we had the worst light show imaginable, no-one had seen anything like that before. This is psychedelia, man.
I think we were all in a fairly confused state – it was only long after all that period was over that we really started to talk about what we were going to try and do. Vague attempts were made at that time, with “Games For May”, to do a show of our own, but then we didn`t manage to follow it through and do another one until two years after, and that`s really a long time not to do something you were intending to do. It was just muddle and finances and being out of control really – just muddling along.

STALE

You do have the reputation anyway of taking quite a long time to get things together. Do you find you need that time just to keep the hassles at bay, give yourselves some room to breathe?

Well, the trouble is that there are so many things to do and any new thing takes so much time. It`s true that we do get stale if we work too much. It`s very simple really – if we work too hard then we all get very tired and we stop doing anything creative, we go into a sort of zombie, bash-it-out state which is really dangerous. It`s the easiest way, possibly, of blowing up a band because the whole thing becomes pointless and you lose all interest in what you`re doing.
That`s for us – in the words of the Scottish guru (Ron Geesin) we`re all humans, and what some people get off on, others don`t. There are some bands who can work 300 days out of the year doing live shows and that`s when they`re happy, but it doesn`t work like that for us. We try and work live as much as we can, and record, which takes so long, and so it gets very heavy to try to find really long periods of time to write new things without rushing them. Like for “Dark Side Of The Moon” we did give ourselves a reasonable amount of time, and it still wasn`t long enough. We could always use more time.
We don`t work all that much in England, it`s true – it tends to be one tour a year or something. But for a long time we suffered terrible embarassment here because we felt we were just going out all the time and doing the same things. “Ummagumma” was supposed to be a farewell gift of all those live numbers – goodbye, that`s it. We still do bits of them now in fact, but that`s because we like to do them, but for three years or something we did them because we had nothing to replace them. I just felt embarassed in England, because people would shout out for what we were going to do next, because they knew what we were going to do next. There just wasn`t anything else.

ELDERLY

Though even when you put new stuff in they still shout for the oldies.

Yeah, but at least we`re splitting it now. But that is one of the dangers of being an elderly band – anything over three years, and particularly the 1967 syndrome, because you`re history. “Darling, they`re playing our tune, it brings back that summer in Hyde Park, doesn`t it?”
Really. The younger ones come along and wants to know what it was all like then, because they didn`t have mothers and fathers tell them about it, but they certainly had elder brothers and sisters saying “when we were young, there was the Pink Floyd, you know”.

Does it surprise you that you`ve stayed together so much longer than most bands?

Yes, it does, mainly because you always think it`s your band that`s got the nutters in it. You occasionally meet people from other bands and they seem very nice, and you start thinking “I wish I worked in a band with real people like that in it”; and then you find out that they`re all much worse than the lot you`re thrown in with, much worse, and they all attack each other with ice-picks and so on.

Right. I don`t know whether it`s because I`ve known you as the Pink Floyds for so long, but I can`t imagine any of you moving off to form a new band of your own somehow.

I think it could always happen – there`s always various hurdles that you either get over or you don`t, say the first year, or the third year, or relative to money or success or something, or people feeling that they`re not getting the credit for something they`ve done, or they could do better by themselves. I think “Ummagumma” was a great thing in that respect, because everyone got a chance to show what they could do.
There are still a lot of things, too, that we could all do together that we`re all aware of, and someone said they wanted to go off and do something on his own, then it would be cool to do that as well. There are bands where if someone wanted to do that everyone else would say no, but I`m sure we wouldn`t now.

Or they say “yes, but we`ve all got to do it.” But perhaps also it`s because you have been able to take time over what you want to do. After the initial hit single thing, it`s been a fairly un-hysterical, gentle climb upwards rather than the very fast David Bowie kind of situation.

True, but it`s all surmise really. I think that`s one of the most interesting things about rock and roll bands, is the way they work together, the psychology of the group. It`s equivalent to families, and various things I`ve never been in but I`d imagine would be similar, one being a small army unit, and another a prep school.
Because you can oscillate so easily between love and hate – real love and real hate. At one moment you can feel really close to them, or to one of them, or you can hate them. It`s never two against two, either, it`s always three against one, it really is amazing to watch sometimes. Jokes, and the way they become teasing, and bullying – that`s what it gets down to.
And again it`s surmise, but think we`ve been lucky in that we`ve used our managers when there`s been a lot of aggression instead of always ganging up on each other. Steve O`Rourke (their present manager) can take a lot of aggravation from us – we can be incredibly spiteful, and he can channel a lot of that from us without actually breaking, and beating us about the heads with clubs. That seems to be fantastically important.

NIGHTMARES

I`d never thought of that – that could be one of a manager`s most important functions, because you can`t take it out on other people, like roadies. Apart from anything else they`d leave immediately.

Right, and anyway that would be like going out into the audience and finding somebody very small and beating them up, it wouldn`t be fair. And you couldn`t pick on anyone bigger because you might lose. You need someone of equal stature. All that, of course, is particularly true when you`re on the road.

Staggering through some kind of strange nightmare, like the first American tour, which appears to have been the prototype nightmare American trip.

I`m sure that was a dream, in fact, and we all seemed to share it, which is the most alarming thing. That`s it, I suppose – there`s such a wealth of things that we`ve been through, that after a certain point you feel almost obliged to stay together just so you can tell each other funny stories about “do you remember when…”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Melanie, Roxy Music, Medicine Head, Jimmy Cliff, John Entwhistle, Paul Simon, Fleetwood Mac, Yes, Steve Tilson.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

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ARTICLE ABOUT Yes FROM SOUNDS, October 28, 1972

The first part of this story was printed a little while back and here is the just as excellent part two. This story of Yes` beginning deserves to be read as it is an fantastic account of their early days. Enjoy this write-up from one of the most talented music journalists around in 1972, Mrs. Valentine.
Have a good time!

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How Yes stopped being the little band round the corner and learnt to cope with success Part 2

Penny Valentine concludes her interview with Jon Anderson and Chris Squire

For Yes, the year of 1969 was almost exclusively devoted to “slogging round the country”. The music seemed to be gaining wider acceptance, still on a small level and there was hardly any money in the coffers. But while the feeling inside the band stayed at peak enthusiasm nobody was worried. At the end of the year they played Bristol University – second on the bill to the Who:
“I`ll never forget that night”, says Jon. “Not because we were so brilliant but because the Who lent us their PA system and Pete Townshend came on stage after our set and really gave the audience an amazing bit of chat about us.
“We couldn`t believe it. It was an enormous pat on the back. When you play with a band like the Who that you`ve admired for years and then something like that happens – well it gave us the incentive to keep going. We knew then we weren`t on the wrong track”.

GUIDANCE

By then “Time And A Word” was being formulated. Again the band were in desperate search of guidance and strength inside the studios. They got Tony Colton in as a producer and Tony Cox to help out with arrangements:
“In a strange way Tony Colton influenced the band a lot. We needed some sort of egging on and he did that”, says Jon. “Eddie Offard was our engineer on that album and again, because Tony told us we were on the right track, it spurred us on.”
“Jon had a lot more confidence than I did on that album. I think I`d lost a bit by then…”
They both think “Time And A Word” was too sterile and clinical to really get to the public – certainly it didn`t smash the charts apart. But by the beginning of `70 when it came out they had other problems to contend with.
It was getting very obvious that Pete Banks was losing his enthusiasm – and Jon Anderson was the first to be aware of it:

PACE

“We were rehearsing so much that it was obvious there was going to be one person lagging behind. It turned out to be Pete. He didn`t have the gall we had, the conviction. During rehearsals he`d always come in right at the end, and when we were cutting the album we were obviously losing pace with him. He`d just sit about and never be that enthusiastic.
“What was even worse was that at the same time we`d stopped being so green and thought we`d got the wrong manager. Roy Flynn booked us on a whole series of really weird European dates, and so just when we thought we ought to have been charging around Britain solidifying ourselves we were somewhere in Europe”.
In Spring of 1970 they came back from Europe depressed and forgotten. Pete Banks officially quit and the band made the decision to lay off. “We weren`t getting anywhere so we decided to do nothing”, says Squire.

WITHDRAW

There was so much depression inside the band that nobody even felt they wanted to replace Banks. They just wanted to withdraw into themselves, disappear and not have to cope with yet another outsider. But just before they went off to Devon for their withdrawal period, a new young guitarist – Steve Howe – came on the scene.
Chris had already seen him play with Tomorrow and been very impressed with his work. He suggested bringing him in to Anderson. Only Squire and Jon were for the idea but in the end Howe joined them in Devon:
“At the time Chris and I were still the strongest members of the band”, says Jon. “But while we were away we suddenly realised that not only had we found someone who could replace Pete in the group but we`d found someone as strong as we were – which was really a surprise.”
They stayed in Devon for nearly six months. During that time they rehearsed and wrote all the material that was later to appear on “The Yes Album”. Confidence had somehow miraculously returned to everyone – a feeling invigorated when they returned to London to play their first concert dates and were amazed to find that they weren`t the forgotten men they`d supposed.

SHAMBLES

“Everything around us – management, equipment, money – was in a complete shambles”, says Chris. “But the main thing was that we were confident in our music. So we ignored everything else and hoped it would turn out okay. There was a unity in the band that was like the unity two years before, a unity that had dwindled right off was somehow back again.
“When we got back on stage we even tried things we weren`t really capable of. We`d give anything a try. We didn`t care what was happening behind our backs. All we knew was that we felt really happy we were a group again”.
Apart from the pats of encouragement here and there and the Marquee residency under their belts – (Anderson says that probably the one thing that gave them a feeling of having made any ground at all was the encouragement and help they got from the Marquee people) – Yes were still, on top of it all, having trouble with their albums.
When it came to recording sessions for “The Yes Album” the band again looked round for a really strong producer to put their ideas into action:
“At the time we wanted Paul McCartney but in the end there was Eddie and us and for the first two weeks of recording we were scared stiff”, recalls Anderson. “We suddenly saw what we`d got ourselves into and then slowly we realised we could, in fact, make our own album without needing anyone else to be there. Because we were so sure at that point what we wanted musically to come out on that album it was a lot easier than we thought.”
“The Yes Album” was released at the end of 1970. Because of a national postal strike SOUNDS a few weeks later carried not the national chart, but the Virgin record chart, and in that line-up “The Yes Album” was number one. Chris Squire says now that he firmly believes because of this and because anyone looking at it would think it was the genuine chart it got interest going for the very first time for a Yes album.

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Whatever the reason three months later “The Yes Album” made it`s appearance in the top five and the band had their first hit. Meanwhile all the mess that had up until now surrounded the band and hindered it`s advancement sorted itself out. During the beginning of 1970 Chris Squire had met Brian Lane in his hairdressers. Lane was to become the band`s new manager and through him they went with Hemmdale – a public company that had never before been connected with rock music. A lot of people outside the group thought this was a particularly strange move but for Yes it was to give them the hard core security background they needed.
All through the rest of the year Yes`s first American tour was on the cards but never quite materialised. In fact it was the start of 1971 that saw them in the States for the first time – by now the album and a single from it were in the US chart:
“Brian had had a lot trouble getting us a really top agent in America” says Chris. “But eventually we went out with Jethro Tull which was really excellent. We`d never worked with a band as amazingly big as that in our lives and for five weeks we were playing to between 15,000 and 20,000 people every day. The really strange thing was that having thought we`d got out there and nobody would know much about us, we were really strong in a few places like Philadelphia. The guy came out on stage and said `the first band tonight will be this new British band – Yes` and about half the place went into uproar, because they knew about us from earlier albums and what we`d been doing.”
For once the band really had something to be “up” about. But at the smooth passage that had just started unwinding in front of them was coming to another rough patch. On their return from America Tony Kaye left:
“During the course of the tour we were aware that the music we were playing needed more colour” says Jon. “And really at that time Tony wasn`t playing anything other than organ. We all like Tony but – well he was more interested in other things, a bit of a midnight raver. We`d been back about a week when we all agreed it would really be advisable to look for someone else. I`d never seen what Rick Wakeman could get into -but all of a sudden everyone else in the band was very strong on him coming in.”

TROUBLE

It turned out that the two people most into the Wakeman replacement were Chris and Steve. Steve it turned out was the one person who`d been having most trouble working with Kaye through the US tour:
“He was the least happy” says Chris “Because he`d spend hours tuning up before a gig and it was really frustrating for him to go on and then have Tony charge in with the wrong chords. And Tony did get very lax. His confidence got to the point where he`d flaunt his body around and then put his fingers in the wrong place. It`s really important to know when you`re with a band everyone`s really trying equally. Everyone`s got to be equally interested in making sure the gigs are as perfect as possible – that`s what makes a band worth their salt.”
It was with Wakeman`s entrance onto the scene that things appeared to settle for the band. Not specifically because of Rick but simply that at the precise time he joined Yes were well on the way to cementing their standing on both the home and US market. More, it was with Rick`s joining, that Yes` future attitude to their work and their musicianship within the group was solidified:
“I remember Rick coming along and telling us what he wanted” says Jon. “Then we turned round and told him what WE wanted. That by then we only wanted musicians who would put their whole entity into Yes – and I must say that`s something that he did learn to do. Rick can now go on stage and combat eight keyboards and on the best of nights he`s amazing to watch. It was at that time that Yes became a band that was very strict with itself in a lot of things besides their music.”
During the American tour Yes had written all the material that was to be laid down on their “Fragile” album – cut just at the time Rick came into the line-up. When “Fragile” emerged from Advision studios onto the open market it sold better in the States than it did in Britain – something both Jon and Chris think was a direct result of the material content:

SHOCKED

“`The Yes Album` was conceived in Devon” says Jon. “And I think it was a much more English album because of that. When we got to America that first time we were so shocked in lots of respects – at the situations we face there – it got reflected in the songs we wrote. So I suppose `Fragile` came out as a more American album.”
One of the biggest things “Fragile” did was that, while it may not have clarified the band`s position here, it was the instigator of much of their next work – the “Close To The Edge” album. Of all their work it has been “Close To The Edge” that has possibly really reflected in both critical and commercial terms what Yes stand for now. The zenith of their work to date. The final pat on the back that showed very clearly that Yes are now successful in every term:
“What happened on `Fragile` helped make `Close To The Edge` what it is” says Jon. “Personally I learnt a lot from that about vocals and we used tapes for the first time – something Pete Townshend had been talking about for ages. As Bill Bruford used to say – the rock scene follows Pete Townshend around – which in a sense it does.”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Melanie, Roxy Music, Medicine Head, Jimmy Cliff, John Entwhistle, Paul Simon, Fleetwood Mac, Nick Mason, Steve Tilson.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

ARTICLE ABOUT Fleetwood Mac FROM SOUNDS, October 28, 1972

There is a chance that I may change the name of this blog in the future, so I was wondering if you would like to help me with a new name? Something that would look good on a t-shirt, maybe? I have some ideas myself, but I don`t feel I have found the ultimate name yet. I don`t think it should contain the word “Article” as that would be kind of boring, and the word “Kerrang” is already taken. It`s hard….
Well, something that may be a little easier is to read this article from a very turbulent time in this band`s career. A lot of changes would eventually make this band end up in a very special place, so maybe all the turmoil was a good thing?
But please – don`t forget to name this blog – all suggestions can be written as a comment here, sent to my e-mail or posted in my Facebook-group.

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The new Mac will never let you down

Interview by Steve Peacock

If you ever had those Fleetwood Mac, Chicken Shack, John Mayall Can`t Fail Blues that Adrian Henri used to sing about you`ll know all about the late sixties British bloose boom.
And the chances are, you`ll know a bit about the band called Fleetwood Mac in late 1972 as well. Two original members remain, Mick Fleetwood and John McVie; there`s Christine McVie (neè Perfect) from Chicken Shack; and there are the newest additions, Bob Weston and Dave Walker from Savoy Brown, another of the British Bloosers who surely would have made Henri`s song if they`d rhymed with anyone else. Bob Welch, from California, is the outcast, but then I suppose devious introductions can`t have everything.
Fleetwood Mac have been through some changes since halcyon days of the late sixties. They have, in Christine`s words, got off the blues, and the faces have changed as well. Peter Green left, Christine joined; Jeremy Spencer left, Bob Welch joined; and now Danny Kirwan (who Peter brought into the group after it had started) has left, and Bob and Dave have joined.
That last shuffle, says Christine, was “just one of those things. He wanted to do other things and it was a basically amicable thing where he wanted to leave and we basically wanted to say cheerio, you know? We were finding we couldn`t really work together so it had to happen. He was really more interested in recording and writing his own material – he was halfway through doing his own solo album anyway, so I presume he`ll finish that and go on doing that kind of thing.
“I don`t think he`ll ever want to go on stage again – really I don`t think he enjoyed that side of it very much. It was just a parting of the ways.”

CHANGES

Christine, Bob and Dave were sitting in their publicist`s office, fresh from rehearsing the new band, and very enthusiastic about the music they were making. They were a bit at a loss to say how the changes had affected the band, but Christine said: “One thing is that everyone seems to get on very well with each other now, an extremely friendly state of affairs which is nice, and I would imagine rather rare. A lot of bands seem to have problems about that. Musically the band seems to be a lot harder than it`s ever been, more positive.”
They`ve known each other from way back of course, and when Fleetwoods did a three-month tour of the States earlier this year Savoy Brown were there, too. As Bob pointed out, this made the changes easy: “Everyone is very much aware of what everyone else can do, and we were even before we joined up. We`d watched each other on stage and got to know each other, so all those preliminaries were out of the way before we started.”
Christine: “It`s not as if we did any auditioning or anything, we didn`t have to go through all that rigmarole of trying people out. We already knew who we wanted, and fortunately we were able to get `em.”
The new Fleetwood Mac will be back on the road in November, gigging in Britain for the first time in nearly a year. “The band hasn`t played in England for so long that it`s hard to know how people are going to react,” she said. “Or whether they`re going to turn up even. We really don`t know what`s going to happen, but from our side of it we`re confident we can put on a good show, so let`s just hope that England`s ready for a few more changes in the Mac.

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CURIOSITY

“It`s funny, but that doesn`t seem to matter so much in America – they don`t go to see personalities so much, they go to see a band. If they come to see Fleetwood Mac they don`t seem to care all that much who`s in the band as long as it turns them on. If that happens they`ll give you the response.
“I think in England we`ll probably get people coming along out of curiosity as much as anything else, just to see what`s happening with the band now. And probably we`ll get a percentage of them coming along to pull us to bits like a lot of them do. It`ll be interesting whatever happens.”
It`s a strange thing, the way Fleetwood`s popularity in this country started to go down at the same time as it started to go up in America. That was about the time Peter Green left the band: “I think a lot of people probably found someone else to like then,” says Christine, “because he really was the mainstay of the band then.” Dave agreed: “I think it was down to the thing of audiences still liking guitar stars a lot, and Peter was a bit monumental.”
Christine: “I think it was with `Kiln House`, the first album after Peter left, that the record sales began to go noticeably down, like crossing off a few noughts, and our albums haven`t sold well in this country for a couple of years now. But in America that was the first one that really sold at all, and they`ve gone consistently up since then.
“Going back to what we were saying about audiences before, I think American audiences maybe do come to see personalities as well, but they`re far more aware of whether they`re enjoying themselves at a gig as well as anything else. They tend to create an atmosphere among themselves whereas I think English audiences want it all to come from the band, which puts a lot of strain on you. If you play badly over there though it`s just tough shit, because you`ve got everything going for you before you start.”
But obviously they`re hoping they`re going to make it in England again this time round. As Dave said rather wistfully: “I think for Bob and I it would be extra satisfying. America and the money is all very nice, but…”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Melanie, Roxy Music, Medicine Head, Jimmy Cliff, John Entwhistle, Paul Simon, Yes, Nick Mason, Steve Tilson.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

ARTICLE ABOUT John Entwhistle (The Who) FROM SOUNDS, October 28, 1972

I am on a visit to London today, staying in this wonderful city until Sunday, and what better way to celebrate than sharing this article about one of the members of The Who, a band formed in London in 1964. When I`m here I try to make room for some sightseeing at famous places relating to modern rock music history. I have been to Freddie Mercury`s house, went to all the music shops in Denmark Street and bought some rock and roll street wear at Camden Market. I am thinking of going away to see the offices of Classic Rock Magazine where so many of my favourite music journalists have worked. If you have any other suggestions for my visit, please send some words my way! Thank you!

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Entwhistle: more rigour than mortis

Interview by Martin Hayman

The other side of the glass window the forgotten man of the Who is pumping out bass notes and a lunatic figure at the piano bashes out “March of the Mods” with a fiendish cackle. This is Tony Ashton, drinker, fun-timer and piano player extraordinaire.
Entwhistle cuts a commanding if slightly impassive figure, burly rather than stout and dressed in his customary slightly sinister black. He cracks into a grin at the antics of his piano player and after a couple of false starts for fits of laughter, the band, boxed off from each other by studio screens, blaps into some hairy rock and roll.
The take done, they stroll back into the control box for refreshments with an air of well-earned satisfaction. Entwhistle exchanges some light-hearted banter with the Who`s “press agent” along the lines of “More rigour than mortis there I`d say, har har”, and plays through a delightful little death song about Rollerskate Kate who met her end in the fast lane of the motorway and has now gone to join the Great Skating Rink In The Sky. Shoop-doo-be-doop.
Yes, it`s the man who brought us well-loved little masterpieces of monstrosity like “Boris The Spider” and “Cousin Kevin”, and he`s doing it again. This new album, which will be the sequel to “Whistle Rhymes” (coming your way on November 3) rejoices in the blood-curdling title “Rigor Mortis” – thus the pun.

It`s a rock and roll album with an updated feel and John`s own extra little something, his brand of black humour, which is quite endearing when you get into it. Assisting at the funeral are the aforementioned Tony Ashton, hammering the ivories, Alan Ross on guitar and Graham. Graham who? “Er… can`t remember his second name. I only met him about three days ago. `Ere, what`s Graham`s second name?” he shouts up at the control room. A voice detaches itself from burble of chatter on the intercom and bellows “Deakin. D-E-A-K-I-N.” He plays drums. “Ah, Right,” says the deadpan Entwhistle.
Alan Ross figured on the last album “Whistle Rhymes” and brought in the drummer from his own group Ro Ro, so there`s already a familiar set-up here. So far they have laid down four of five tracks and they are working fast. It all seemed to be clicking by the spontaneity of the jam they were doing when we arrived – not for the record.
These are early days yet, though, as there`s a lot of overdubbing to do, mostly horns. John himself is quite a dab hand with the horns, and plays a collection which excludes only the slide trombone.

FLUID

“This one`s more or less a set group,” he says, “there`s piano, guitar, bass and drums and the brass comes in later. This was by way of distinguishing it from the previous effort, which was much more of a fluid band, with odd players popping up on different tracks: John Weider on violin, Peter Frampton on guitar, Jimmy McCulloch on guitar, Neil Shepherd on keyboards.
“I should imagine there`ll be a few guest appearances later on, maybe sort of Moon on congas or something. And I haven`t paid Frampton for the last session either so he`ll probably come, and I`ll pay him for both.”
Did John feel that being with the Who had given him a freedom to get down his own musical ideas which he might otherwise never have had? “Any member of the Who can do a solo album: Roger`s gonna do one, Keith could quite easily do one, producing and playing drums. But as far as I`m concerned, it all depends on where I got to without the Who.
“If I`d been in another group it might have been the same. If I`d never got into a group then most likely I wouldn`t have started composing anyway. Most likely be an amateur French horn player in an operatic society. I did a bit of everything – played Dixieland, modern jazz, brass band, military music – but most of my time I spent in an orchestra. Middlesex School`s Orchestra. I played French horn in it for about two years… I really enjoyed that.”
Not actually one of your Sheperd`s Bush nationalists then? “No, I`m from Chiswick, which is like a gnat`s piss away. The reason the Who say they come from Sheperd`s Bush is because that`s the general circle we were moving around in when we first started playing. Roger lived in Sheperd`s Bush and then moved to Chiswick so really it all came from the Chiswick, Ealing, Wembley area.”

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How much of his time did he find was taken up with business relating to the Who? “It varies from year to year. Two years ago we were doing about three gigs a fortnight, playing universities and we would be doing about two four-week American tours a year, plus one English tour and at least a couple of big gigs in Europe, couple of television appearances.
“This year we`ve hardly done anything. We got two-thirds the way through an album concept and scrapped that as an album. The first six months of the year we hardly saw each other. We didn`t work at all. A five-week tour of Europe and two-thirds of an album – that`s all we`ve done this year.
“We had eight months off altogether, and we realised it didn`t really work, that we shouldn`t do it in future, leave it at the most two, three months. I think we`re starting early next year, recording and touring.”
Why had they decided to scrap the five tracks projected for the next album? “Well I dunno whether they`ll turn up as about five `B` sides. I felt that it was too near to `Who`s Next` – a step on, but still too near. Maybe the public wouldn`t have thought so, but we felt we needed another concept album. We`ll be using it as the basis of a new stage act, sometime next year.”
Entwhistle does not regret “the good old days” when the group played small clubs and even humped its own gear. This despite the huge organisational task concerned with setting up a tour. There are twenty-four people on the road for a Who tour, and each venue is visited by the road managers to ascertain whether the hall is suitable.

He doesn`t think of himself as “Mr. Bassman” either, and says that he has his own career as well as that of the Who to think of. Surprisingly, he has built up a following in the States, where his first solo album “Smash Your Head Against The Wall” sold in excess of 100,000 copies. “I wasn`t really concerned with what England thought about it,” he says. “It was an anti-frustration album. It was to stop me getting so frustrated that I left the
Who. I got all the numbers that I`d written in the last four years and put them on the album.
“`Whistle Rhymes` was written in two months as an album, and this one is written as a rock and roll album. The first one just got me out of a rut I was in. I was writing more and more material and there was just no outlet. One Who album a year with two or three songs of mine on it doesn`t get rid of seventy songs, does it, and that`s what I was getting towards.”
What about John`s taste for the bizarre in his choice of themes for songs? “They`re not as obviously bizarre now. I like to think the words are sicker in a more subtle way now,” giving a graveyard chuckle. “I still find it easier to switch words around and write songs about suicide, things like that.
“There`s too many people composing love songs, religious songs and serious things like that. If it`s my bag to write `orrible sick songs which disturb people some way then I`m content that it`s my job.”

REALISTIC

But deadpan expressions aside, Entwhistle is not some kind of a death freak. He thinks of his songs as having a humourous content which can be overlooked only at your own peril. It may be a black humour, but death is as natural to yer human condition as is birth. And to laugh at the grotesqueness of life is as realistic as to cry.
“Well you don`t want to make it too depressing, do you, otherwise you`d get people jumping out of the window half-way through listening to my album.”
And I bet Charles Manson never saw the humorous side of death. So as long as Entwhistle keeps laughing, that following of his will never be really morbid.
Finally, did he feel like the forgotten man of the Who at any point? “Well it`s almost become part of the act now, me standing still, hasn`t it? I mean if you`ve got four blokes standing on the wing of a plane going at five hundred miles an hour, and three of them are whirling their arms around, which one don`t you look at?”

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Melanie, Roxy Music, Medicine Head, Jimmy Cliff, Fleetwood Mac, Paul Simon, Yes, Nick Mason, Steve Tilson.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.

 

ARTICLE ABOUT Kenny Jones (The Faces) FROM SOUNDS, October 21, 1972

A nice article with a man who seems to be quite humble and down-to-earth, despite his success in two well known bands. This article should also be of interest for fans of The Who and Rod Stewart, I think, as Mr. Jones later replaced one of the very best drummers, Keith Moon, in the Who. Rod is mentioned briefly a couple of places here too.
Hope you all enjoy it!

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Kenny Jones in the talk-in

Interview conducted by Ray Telford

Of all the Faces, Kenny Jones is probably the most enigmatic character in the band. In the midst of the most rowdy, boisterous backstage interlude it`s always been Jones that sat quietly in the middle of it all never quite getting involved in the Faces` full repartee.
As the Who have their Entwhistle, so the Faces have Jones – a kind of balancer that every band needs. A reliable solid entity. Consequently it`s doubtful that he`s ever had the real praise due to him as the fine drummer he is.
Last week, in his manager`s office, a surprisingly relaxed, forthcoming Kenny Jones talked about his work with the Faces, on the Chuck Berry sessions and the resurgence of interest in the Small Faces.

Let`s talk a bit about the old Small Faces. Do you think they ever got the musical recognition they deserved?

Yeah, it had its heyday, you know, it had a climax to it. It went through a period when it was really top level but then it sort of slid off a bit.

Do you think they were ever recorded properly?

Yeah, I don`t think we were ever recorded badly. Glyn (Johns) was a great help. He did all the early stuff when we recorded at IBC, Pye, Olympic and he really had a lot to do with the sort of feel we got on the early records.

Why was it do you think that the Faces as they are now had to go to America before things started happening?

I think that was just because we weren`t working here much in the beginning. I mean we knew the band had a lot of potential and we wanted to get to the States to sort of get three months solid playing behind us just to pull us together. You know, every band needs that, especially if it`s a re-formed band like we were and it was important for recording, too.

How did the first Faces rehearsals sound?

I don`t remember, actually. I think they were probably a relief to my ear, I mean Ronnie Lane can sing and Woody can sing harmonies but they haven`t got that front liner sort of thing. Like, Rod can do that and he had no trouble in working himself into the numbers.

At this time Rod was contracted to do the solo albums?

Yeah, when I asked him to join he`d already signed with Mercury so there was a lot of business things to sort out because apart from Rod being with Mercury – we were with Warner Brothers – we still had all the old Immediate contracts to get out of and the whole thing was really involved. It took a long time to get round but Billy Gaff was the brains behind all that.

Did the fact that Rod would be doing solo albums worry the band?

Not really, because in the early days we tried to keep them separate. Like we`d play a bit rock and roll and Rod would do maybe some country things on his own albums but we soon forgot about all that. We just don`t worry about it now – it`s all the same group more or less now.

It seems to take The Faces a long time to record albums. Any particular reason?

Yeah, it does take us a bit of time to record. When Rod goes in to do his albums it doesn`t take long because everything`s always his own ideas, you know, and he just tells everyone what he wants and that`s it but when we`re ready to record like there`s five people who`ve got to have a say and that can confuse the issue, if you see what I mean. We have to scrap a lot of things because of that. I mean sometimes we go in with a set thing in mind and it`ll work but usually we just go in and have a little play and see what comes out.

What`s been the easiest Faces` album to record?

I think the last one was about the easiest. That album was a step in the right direction for us because we`ve still to come up one that really satisfies the group in every way. I mean it`s taking time because we`re still finding out about each other. See, if it was only one person giving the directions there`d be no comeback but as it is there`s five people still feeling each other out and trying at the same time to come up with a direction or feel which pleases everybody.

CHUCK BERRY

Does Rod record the vocals separate from the backing tracks?

Well, what happens is that when we do the backing tracks he puts on a rough vocal because it helps us to go along with it a bit more. Then he scrubs that out and comes in later and does his own thing.

How much of a perfectionist are you when it comes to drum sounds?

Well, actually. I have a good thing going with Glyn Johns because we both have the same ideas about how drums should sound. I mean we can talk to each other about drums and know exactly what each other means. With some engineers if you tell them what you want they get the needle but I always manage to come out of a studio after a session with a decent sound.

How do you feel about the sessions you did in London recently with Chuck Berry?

That was really good. I was surprised, you know, because we did the album at Pye and I`ve never liked the sound there but it sounded nice. I got a good sound straight off – I couldn`t believe it. I didn`t think too much of the other side of that album – the live side – but I suppose we had the advantage because we did it in the studio. It was a bit rough, you know, but it had a nice feel. I think we went in about twelve o`clock and came out about eight and everything was finished. In fact, he wrote some words there and then in the studio and there`s one song where he just sings “I love you” every few bars. That was a really loose session.

Do you have trouble getting a good feel in a studio?

Yeah. As soon as the red light goes on it just freezes me. You can be playing away quite nicely getting a number together and you think that it`s all there for the taking but when the light goes on something happens to you, I don`t know what it is but I think it`s something most people feel about recording. There are some people who just don`t think about it, though, you know they just play and let it come out.

How would you feel about doing a full live album?

Yeah, we`re going to do one probably after the new album we`re working on now.

How do you feel about drum solos?

I don`t particularly like them, actually. I mean the only thing I could do that comes near a solo on stage is “Losing You”, and even then I keep it really basic with a few little fiddley things on it but that`s about it really.

Is Ronnie Lane the kind of bass player you work best with?

Yeah. We`re very close. We`ve been together for so long, you know, playing with him is just very natural because he bought his first guitar when I bought my first set of drums and we`ve been playing together since. He`s great to work with because he`s very simple and punchy. I`ve got no complaints about Ronnie.

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SIMPLE

British rock and roll rhythm sections seem to be much more effective than they used to be. Why do you think that is?

I don`t know I think everyone`s just a bit more mature. People are playing a lot more simply and there`s just a lot less busy drummers around. I don`t really go out to gigs a lot but I know there are lots of really good drummers around, you know, just guys that I`ve met on our gigs. I`ve just got into a thing now where I just don`t worry about how good other drummers are, you know, I don`t want to copy anyone and I just play what comes off the top of my head. I mean I`ve always done that but more so now, like instead of thinking about the song whatever I just play along with the beat and keep it extremely simple – even if it means just hitting the bass drum.

Would you agree that you personally reach a peak in your playing during a long number because it`s always struck me that you need to feel your way into a song to hit a good groove?

Yeah, sure, I always play better towards the end of a number because I like to put a lot of sweat in. Like, when I`m really tired that`s when I start to play extra hard and really begin to push. It`s something I`m not conscious of at the time, though, Ronnie (Lane) is the same.

Have you ever felt that you`ve been playing too much and that your style needs pruning?

Yeah, there have been times when I`ve felt that. See, as I say, I`ve always tried to be a simple drummer but I`ve had the odd gig when I go on and I get so excited and wound up that I`m just hitting everything in sight but then I think, before anyone tells me, what the hell am I doing and then I begin to lay back. The important thing is, though, that I know when I`m playing too much, I can recognise it.

That seems to be a very British thing among drummers.

Yeah, right. Like every bar is a fill in. Some of the soul drummers like A 1 Jackson with Booker T and the MGs are incredible it`s just straight swing all the time.

What similarities, musically, do you feel between this band and the Small Faces?

I don`t think there are any real similarities. Although it`s got the same name it`s completely different. Even when we formed, this is a thing a lot of people don`t realise, although there was three of us in the old band it was a completely different thing. I didn`t even know what Mac was all about when he was playing organ then, really, because we all played differently and we were feeling each other out as a new band. It was just the same as if we`d never seen each other before. But, basically, the only similarity I`d say would be that Mac, Ronnie and myself were still that little rhythm section tightening things up.

RE-RELEASES

There seems to be a lot of interest in the old Small Faces in the States now.

Yeah, they`re re-releasing all the old records. Like “Ogden`s” been re-released and all the early stuff – I don`t know where the F–ing money is, though.

Do you share the opinion that “Ogden`s Nut Gone Flake” was the best Small Faces album?

Yeah. The two albums I like is the very first one we ever did, I think it was just called Faces or Small Faces, and “Ogden`s” and then there were a few tracks on other albums that are good but, basically, these are the two I really liked.

How do you find touring in the States?

Well the first tour we did there was bloody long – something like three months – but that was the one that really broke us and I enjoyed that one. The rest I haven`t particularly enjoyed. I enjoy playing for the audiences but I don`t like being in the States because I get very homesick – I think the rest of them do too. We just love to get back home.

How do you feel on the road?

You get bored. I mean hotel rooms are about all you see. You`ve heard it all before but it`s true. The only good thing about it is the television and the few friends we have.

When`s the next American tour?

I`d say in about four months because we`re having a bit of a break now. Well, actually, it might be six months because we`re doing Japan first then on to Australia and New Zealand. We did Australia with the old band and that was really funny, it was a laugh because we did it with The Who. It was quite interesting, though, just playing to different audiences.

I read somewhere once that Ronnie Wood reckoned the band`s drinking was getting out of hand on stage.

Oh yeah. Well it still does, really. I mean we all drink wine – except for Mac – but Rod`s THE wine drinker. But it does get out of hand, especially if we get to a gig really early and you just go into the dressing room and start knocking it back. Alcohol really slows me up.

How about dope?

Dope? That doesn`t affect me too much. I mean I`ll have a little blast now and again but even then that`s not too often. But that`s just me, you know. Dope used to be nice in the old days but you sort of grow out of it.

FESTIVALS

Getting back to America, how much stuff have recorded there in the past?

Well, we`ve done a bit but not too much. Like, I can`t see why people go on about studios being different between the States and here because all studios are the same to me. I mean over here in Olympic you can get a good band sound all round but in the States you get one studio that has a good drum sound but a pony old guitar sound and another one will be exactly the opposite and it`s all like that. I think probably from what people have told me – there`s a better brass sound in American studios but that`s about all I can say.

How do you feel about The Faces` open air Festival gigs last summer?

I like festivals on a small scale. I don`t like millions of people all over the place because then it just becomes a shambles, you know what I mean. I think we did about three – the Great Western, Reading and another one. I didn`t like Reading and the Great Western wasn`t much good either because we felt we just weren`t getting across to the people. The ideal size for a festival is about five to eight thousand people, I mean that`s plenty. If it`s a big festival there`s only a small proportion of the whole audience who you can actually play to – the rest of the people see you as little specks on a stage miles away.

What about concert audiences. Do you find English audiences more relaxed than in the States?

I think they probably are but I think basically they`re the same as far as this band`s concerned. There was a time in the early days when there was a difference but I think it`s just that the young people in England have caught up with the American kids – or the other way round, whatever way you see it. It just happened that we broke in America first because they kind of adopted us if you like, but it was an unconscious thing on our part.

BUSINESS

How do you see the business side of rock and roll?

Well, it used to give me headaches in the beginning. I mean we had so much trouble in business things with the old band that it sort of wakens you up to that side of it. There`s so much I know about the whole business thing now, in fact we all do, because we`ve all been screwed out of money at some time or other.
Like, we all know exactly what a good contract is just by sitting down and looking at it rather than like in the old days it`d just be mumbo jumbo and we`d send it to a solicitor and let him see what he thinks. But now we`re probably more up on it than the solicitor. I think it`s a good thing for a band to take an active interest in what`s happening to the money. When you do a gig you`re quoted a price and get the price but then you find out, you investigate, exactly what they`re charging on the door.
We tell the promoters in the States what to charge for concerts and it works out at around an average of two dollars and certainly no more than five. If you get someone screwing kids out of money they won`t get slagged off, it comes back on us. It don`t make you feel good when you arrive at a gig and there`s people standing outside who can`t afford a high admission price. It`s kind of sour.

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I have personally transcribed this from the original paper. Any errors in the text from the original magazine may not have been corrected for the sake of accuracy. If you have a music-related web-page where this fits – please make a link to the article. With credits to the original writer of the article from all of us music fans!

This number of Sounds also contains articles/interviews with these people: Ginger Baker, Johnny Nash, Wild Turkey, David Bowie, Linda Lewis, Osibisa, Lesley Duncan, Yes, Plainsong, Yes, Ian Carr, Mike O`Shea, Lou Reed, Bread.

The original music paper this article came from (pictured at the top) is for sale!

1. Send me an e-mail if you are interested. Send it to: geirmykl@gmail.com
2. The offer should be 20 $ (US Dollars) to be considered. (This includes postage).
3. We conduct the transaction through my verified Paypal account for the safety of both parties.